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Tsutsumi, Tsuyoshi

Picture: Tsutsumi, Tsuyoshi

Tokyo, 1942. When Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi won the International Casals Competition in 1963, the press called him a musician "whose discovery is comparable to that of David Oistrakh in the Brussels Competition in the 1930s." Born in Tokyo, Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi, student of Hideo Saito made his debut at 12 years old with The Tokyo Philharmonic. He won the Japan's most prestigious competition: the Mainichi Music Competition. Audiences have since heard Mr. Tsutsmi's solo appearances with the ORTF in Paris, the Berlin Radio Symphony, Rotterdam Philharmonic, Netherlands Chamber Orchestra, Munich Philharmonic, London Symphony, London Philharmonia, the Czech and Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, and many others. He has appeared with many great conductors and orchestras such as, Seiji Ozawa and the Toho Gakuen Orchestra at the United Nations; at Avery Fisher Hall with the NHK Symphony; Mustislav Rostropovich and the National Symphony. From 1988 he is a Professor of Music at the University of Illinois. He was frequently invited to conduct master classes at places like in Japan, Canada, France and Holland. He has also been invited as a jury member of prestigious international music competitions which include ARD in Munich, Mtislav Rostropovich in Paris, CBC/SRC in Ottawa, Osaka International in Osaka and P. Casals in Kronberg. Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi has various CD releases with Sony. He has been given the Suntory Award for his contribution to music in Japan and was presented National Academy of Arts Prize in music by the Emperor. In 1997 he was elected the first President of Japan Cello Society, and in 2000 elected Music Director of Kirishima International Music Festival and President of Suntory Music Foundation. He was also elected the President of Toho Gakuen School of Music in 2004 and the President of Suntory Hall in September 2007.

Biography

CASSADÓ, Gaspar

Picture: CASSADÓ, Gaspar

Barcelona, 1897 - Madrid, 1966. Spanish cellist and composer. A son of Joaquín Cassadó, the organist and composer, he began his studies with his father, continued at the Barcelona Conservatory, and went to Paris in 1910 for lessons with Casals. His international career began in 1918, and he showed himself a fastidious artist with a generous warmth of tone and sure technique. He gave recitals with such pianists as Bauer, Rubinstein and Iturbi and joined Menuhin and Kentner for piano trios; in the Brahms Double Concerto he was a notable partner to such players as Huberman, Szigeti and Jelly d'Arányi (for the Royal Philharmonic Society's Brahms centenary concert). Under Mengelberg he recorded the Pfitzner Cello Concerto. As a composer influenced by Falla and Ravel, Cassadó produced an oratorio (1946), a D minor Cello Concerto, Rapsodia catalana for orchestra (1928) and a considerable body of chamber music. He taught at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena and in 1959 married the Japanese pianist Chieko Hara.

Biography

  • CASSADÓ | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Suite for cello solo

    I. Preludio-Fantasía

    CLASS 2858: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 18' 19''
    Bow, Indications for the execution - 1' 40''
    Breathing, Articulation - 1' 26''
    Recording, Bow direction - 1' 59''
    Pressure, Sound preparation - 1' 40''
    Part - 37' 03''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 15''
    Sound quality, Shifts or changes of position - 2' 07''
    Shifts or changes of position - 1' 03''
    Harmonics, Bow - 1' 59''
    Fingerings, Vibrato - 1' 50''
    Timbre, Character - 2' 39''
    Pizzicato, Character - 2' 41''
    Accents - 1' 45''

DEBUSSY, Claude

Picture: DEBUSSY, Claude

St Germain-en-Laye, 1862 - Paris, 1918. Born in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France, Claude Debussy studied with Guiraud and others at the Paris Conservatoire (1872-84) and as an 1884 Prix de Rome winner, went to Rome, Italy, though more important impressions came from his visits to Bayreuth (1888, 1889) and from hearing Javanese gamelan music in Paris (1889). Wagner's influence is evident in the cantata La damoiselle élue (1888) and the Cinq poèmes de Baudelaire (1889) but other songs of the period, notably the settings of Verlaine (Ariettes oubliées, Trois mélodies, Fêtes galantes) are in a more capricious style, as are parts of the still somewhat Franckian G minor String Quartet (1893); in that work he used not only the Phrygian mode but also less standard modes, notably the whole-tone mode, to create the floating harmony he discovered through the work of contemporary writers: Mallarmé in the orchestral Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune (1894 - in 1912 used as music for the L'Après-midi d'un Faune ballet production) and Maeterlinck in the opera Pelléas et Mélisande, dating in large part from 1893-5 but not completed until 1902. These works also brought forward a fluidity of rhythm and color quite new to Western music. Pelléas, with its rule of understatement and deceptively simple declamation, also brought an entirely new tone to opera &#151; but an unrepeatable one. Debussy worked on other opera projects and left substantial sketches for two pieces after tales by Edgar Allan Poe (Le diable dans le beffroi and La chute de la maison Usher), but neither was completed. Instead, the main works were orchestral pieces, piano sets, and songs. Among his major orchestral works are the three Nocturnes (1899), characteristic studies of veiled harmony and texture ('Nuages'), exuberant cross-cutting ('Fêtes') and seductive whole-tone drift ('Sirènes'). La mer (1905) essays a more symphonic form, with a finale that works themes from the first movement, though the centerpiece (Jeux de vagues) proceeds much less directly and with more variety of color. The three Images (1912) are more loosely linked, and the biggest, Ibéria is itself a triptych, a medley of Spanish allusions. Finally, the ballet Jeux (1913) contains some of Debussy's strangest harmony and texture in a form that moves freely over its own field of motivic connection. Other late stage works, including the ballets Khamma (1912) and La boîte à joujoux (1913) and the mystery play Le martyre de St. Sébastien (1911), were not completely orchestrated by Debussy, though St. Sébastien is remarkable in sustaining an antique modal atmosphere that otherwise was touched only in relatively short piano pieces (eg. La cathédrale engloutie). Debussy wrote much piano music although the most important of them to begin with are works which, Verlaine fashion, look back at rococo decorousness with a modern cynicism and puzzlement (Suite bergamasque, 1890; Pour le piano, 1901). His first volume of Images pour piano 1904 - 1905 evokes tonality that was rarely heard in works by his contemporaries such as phrases suggesting the rippling of water in the first piece Reflets dans l'eau as well as a homage to Jean-Philippe Rameau's influence in a slow and mysterious court dance in the second piece Hommage à Rameau. But then, as in the orchestral pieces, Debussy began to associate his music with visual impressions of the East, Spain, landscapes etc, in a sequence of sets of short pieces. This can be heard in the volume of pieces known as

Biography

DVORÁK, Antonin

Picture: DVORÁK, Antonin

Nelahozeves, 1841 - Prague, 1904. Dvorák was born in Nelahozeves near Prague where he spent most of his life. He studied music in Prague's Organ School at the end of the 1850s, and through the 1860s played viola in the Bohemian Provisional Theatre Orchestra which was from 1866 conducted by Bedøich Smetana. From 1892 to 1895, Dvoøák was director of the National Conservatory in New York City. The Conservatory was founded by a wealthy socialite, Jeannette Thurber, who wanted a well-known composer as director in order to lend prestige to her institution. She wrote to Dvorák, asking him to accept the position, and he agreed, providing that she were willing to meet his conditions: that talented Native American and African-American students, who could not afford the tuition, must be admitted for free. She agreed to his conditions, and he sailed to America. It was during his time as director of the Conservatory that Dvorák formed a friendship with Harry Burleigh, who became an important African-American composer. Dvorák taught Burleigh composition, and in return, Burleigh spent hours on end singing traditional American Spirituals to Dvorák. Burleigh went on to compose settings of these Spirituals which compare favorably with European classical composition. It was during his visit to the United States that he wrote his most popular work, the Symphony No.9 'From the New World'. Also while in the USA he heard a performance of a cello concerto by the composer Victor Herbert. He was so excited by the possibilities of the cello and orchestra combination displayed in this concerto that he wrote a cello concerto of his own, the Cello Concerto in B minor (1895). Since then the concerto he wrote has grown in popularity and today it is frequently performed. He also left an unfinished work, the Cello Concerto in A major (1865), which was completed and orchestrated by the German composer Günter Raphael between 1925 and 1929. Dvoøák was a colorful personality. In addition to music, there were two particular passions in his life: locomotive engines, and the breeding of pigeons. He eventually returned to Prague where he was director of the conservatoire from 1901 until his death in 1904.

Biography

  • DVORÁK | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in B minor op 104 (cello and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 2859: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 15' 59''
    Phrasing, Tempo - 1' 15''
    Part - 36' 08''
    Attacks, Bow direction - 1' 03''
    Relaxation, Phrasing - 1' 01''
    Phrasing, Articulation - 2' 00''
    Arm, Body gestures - 1' 00''
    Contrast, Phrasing - 1' 36''
    Phrasing, Duration - 1' 42''
    Evenness, Phrasing - 1' 18''
    Phrasing - 1' 35''
    Metrics, Phrasing - 2' 29''
    Up-beat - 1' 54''
    Phrasing - 2' 17''
    Bow distribution, Shifts or changes of position - 1' 32''
    Accompaniment, Contrast - 2' 26''
    Study methods, Shifts or changes of position - 3' 34''
  • DVORÁK | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in B minor op 104 (cello part)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 2859: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 6' 52''
    Phrasing, Bow distribution - 2' 54''
    Phrasing, Body gestures - 1' 27''
    Body gestures, Articulation - 1' 00''

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

  • GENERALITIES | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Theory explanations

    CLASS 2867: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Breathing - 2' 20''
    Part - 2' 20''
    Part - 4' 03''
    Emission, Sound quality - 4' 03''
    Sound quality, Sound projection - 2' 45''

HAYDN, Franz Joseph

Picture: HAYDN, Franz Joseph

Rohrau, 1732 - Vienna, 1809. Austrian composer, brother of Michael Haydn. Neither he nor his contemporaries used the name Franz, and there is no reason to do so today. He began his career in the traditional patronage system of the late Austrian Baroque, and ended as a 'free' artist within the burgeoning Romanticism of the early 19th century. Famous as early as the mid-1760s, by the 1780s he had become the most celebrated composer of his time, and from the 1790s until his death was a culture-hero throughout Europe. Since the early 19th century he has been venerated as the first of the three 'Viennese Classics' (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven). He excelled in every musical genre; during the first half of his career his vocal works were as famous as his instrumental ones, although after his death the reception of his music focussed on the latter (except for The Creation). He is familiarly known as the 'father of the symphony' and could with greater justice be thus regarded for the string quartet; no other composer approaches his combination of productivity, quality and historical importance in these genres. In the 20th century he was understood primarily as an 'absolute' musician (exhibiting wit, originality of form, motivic saturation and a 'modernist' tendency to problematize music rather than merely to compose it), but earnestness, depth of feeling and referential tendencies are equally important to his art

Biography

  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 2860: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 12' 06''
    Part - 23' 31''
    Attacks, Breathing - 2' 19''
    Phrasing, Bow - 2' 17''
    Phrasing - 2' 11''
    Breathing - 1' 05''
    Left hand - 1' 08''
    Phrasing, Body gestures - 1' 25''
    Breathing - 1' 13''
    Pulse - 1' 05''
    Tempo, Metrics - 1' 22''
  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    III. Rondo. Allegro

    CLASS 2867: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Attitude of the musician - 3' 06''
  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 2867: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Articulation, Styles and periods - 1' 28''
    Part - 35' 30''
    Attacks, Bow - 2' 14''
    Articulation, Pressure - 1' 08''
    Body gestures, Pressure - 1' 28''
    Soloist - 1' 48''
    Orchestra conducting, Soloist - 4' 14''
    Vibrato, Pressure - 1' 05''
    Attacks, Bow - 1' 19''
    Weight, Arm - 1' 19''
  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    III. Rondo. Allegro

    CLASS 2860: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 5' 21''
    Part - 4' 24''
    Bow, Pressure - 2' 38''
  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    III. Rondo. Allegro

    CLASS 2867: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Themes and motifs, Contrast - 1' 15''
    Tempo, Attitude of the musician - 3' 06''
  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    II. Adagio

    CLASS 2860: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 4' 53''
  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 2860: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Attacks, Breathing - 2' 19''
    Tempo, Metrics - 1' 22''
  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    II. Adagio

    CLASS 2867: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Themes and motifs, Indications for the execution - 1' 30''
    Dynamics, Fingerings - 1' 05''
    Part - 8' 54''
    Rhythm, Phrasing - 2' 36''
    Indications for the execution, Metrics - 1' 10''
  • HAYDN | Tsutsumi < Cello

    Concerto for cello and orchestra in D major H VIIb: 2 (cello and piano reduction)

    CLASS 2867: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 8' 52''

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