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Zepperitz, Rainer

Picture: Zepperitz, Rainer

Bandung (Java), 1930 - Berlin, 2009. Rainer Zepperitz was born in Bandung (Java). In 1937 he returned to Germany with his family, moving in 1940 to Düsseldorf where he studied at the Robert Schumann Conservatory of Music. At eighteen he became a member of the Düsseldorf Symphony Orchestra. Between 1949 and 1951 Rainer Zepperitz was double bass soloist of the Bonn State Orchestra. In 1951 he became the youngest member of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and since 1957 he was double bass soloist of such orchestra. In 1954 he joined the chamber music ensemble of the Berlin Philharmonic, which later changed its name to Philharmonisches Oktett. At the end of the fifties, he was named professor of the Berlin Hochschule für Musik. In 1977 he founded the chamber music ensemble Philharmonische Virtuosen obtaining great international renown. He was a member of the presidency of such orchestra for over a decade. He also was a founding member of the Orchester-Akademie of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, where he also taught. Many of his students are members of the major orchestras the world over. He recently retired from his professional activity with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and since the 2001-02 academic year Rainer Zepperitz is Head Professor of the Double Bass Chair at the Reina Sofía School of Music.

Biography

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 9 in D minor op 125 (double bass part)

    IV. Finale. Presto

    CLASS 1596: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo - 1' 40''
    Bow, Articulation - 1' 47''
    Dynamics, Portamento - 1' 03''
    Articulation, Bow direction - 1' 04''
    Bow, Duration - 1' 13''
    Bow distribution, Duration - 2' 07''
    Expressivity, Bow - 2' 11''
    Tempo, Dynamics - 1' 03''
    Articulation, Sound quality - 1' 25''
    Articulation, Bow distribution - 2' 08''
    Dynamics, Bow - 1' 35''
    String-crossing, Fingerings - 1' 02''
    Articulation, Character - 1' 57''
    Phrasing, Vibrato - 2' 14''
    Tempo, Dynamics - 1' 18''
    Articulation, Dynamics - 1' 47''
    Bow, Articulation - 1' 32''
    Tempo, Character - 1' 10''
  • BEETHOVEN | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 9 in D minor op 125 (double bass part)

    IV. Finale. Presto

    CLASS 1813: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Duration - 2' 03''
    Tempo, Staccato - 1' 50''
    Phrasing, Articulation - 1' 08''
    Duration, Bow - 1' 06''
    Bow, Expressivity - 1' 57''
    Bow - 1' 52''
    Tempo, Jumps - 1' 49''
    Character, Bow - 2' 03''
    Dynamics, Bow - 2' 50''
    Articulation, Fingerings - 1' 31''
    Accents, Fingerings - 1' 19''
    Fingerings, Dynamics - 1' 22''
    Articulation, Bow direction - 1' 14''
    Fingerings, Harmonics - 2' 00''
    Tempo, Articulation - 1' 09''
    Bow-strokes, Sound quality - 1' 13''
    Tempo, Articulation - 1' 08''
    Fingerings - 1' 01''
  • BEETHOVEN | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 9 in D minor op 125 (double bass part)

    IV. Finale. Presto

    CLASS 2630: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 11' 16''
    Duration, Tempo - 1' 10''
    Sound quality - 2' 13''
    Maintaining the sound - 1' 03''
    Articulation - 1' 01''
    Part - 29' 20''
    Duration, Phrasing - 1' 03''
    Articulation, Expressivity - 1' 26''
    Up-beat - 1' 14''
    Relaxation, Expressivity - 1' 22''
    Study methods, Attitude of the musician - 1' 26''
    Bowings, Rigor or freedom in reading - 1' 20''
    Duration - 1' 00''
    Bow direction, Duration - 1' 41''
    Vibrato, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 27''
    Study methods, Attitude of the musician - 1' 44''
  • BEETHOVEN | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Septet in E flat major op 20 (double bass part)

    I. Adagio - Allegro con brio

    CLASS 1615: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Sforzato - 1' 23''
    Dynamics, Vibrato - 1' 50''
    Bow direction, Indications for the execution - 0' 58''
    Articulation, Character - 1' 47''
    Dynamics, Duration - 2' 22''
    Dynamics, Bowings - 3' 17''
    Interpenetration, Bowings - 1' 52''
  • BEETHOVEN | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Septet in E flat major op 20 (double bass part)

    II. Adagio cantabile

    CLASS 1615: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Bow direction, Bowings - 1' 03''
    Articulation, Dynamics - 1' 30''
    Dynamics, Bow - 1' 01''
  • BEETHOVEN | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 3 in E flat major op 55 'Eroica' (double bass part)

    III. Scherzo - Trio

    CLASS 2521: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 23' 23''
    Fingerings, Up-beat - 0' 58''
    Staccato, Bow - 1' 14''
    Bow, Attacks - 2' 18''
    Bow, Attacks - 1' 16''
    Attacks, Bow distribution - 1' 22''
  • BEETHOVEN | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 3 in E flat major op 55 'Eroica' (double bass part)

    IV. Finale. Allegro molto

    CLASS 2521: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 9' 12''
    Fingerings, Bow direction - 1' 44''

BOTTESINI, Giovanni

Picture: BOTTESINI, Giovanni

Crema, 1821 - Parma, 1889

Biography

  • BOTTESINI | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and piano no. 2 in B minor (double bass part)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 1596: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Articulation, Phrasing - 1' 50''
  • BOTTESINI | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and piano no. 2 in B minor (double bass part)

    II. Andante

    CLASS 3070: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Staccato, Articulation - 1' 11''
    Vibrato, Portamento - 1' 14''
    Bow distribution, Sound quality - 1' 57''
    Low notes, Vibrato - 2' 38''
    Articulation, Maintaining the sound - 1' 13''
    Portamento, Articulation - 1' 13''
    Vibrato, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 02''
    Vibrato, Sound quality - 2' 04''
    Dynamics, Sound quality - 1' 40''
    Portamento, Articulation - 1' 11''
    Bow distribution, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 15''
    Vibrato, Maintaining the sound - 1' 11''
    Dynamics, Sound projection - 1' 45''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Fingerings - 1' 09''
    Dynamics, Vibrato - 1' 21''
    Tempo, Dynamics - 1' 13''
  • BOTTESINI | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and piano in F sharp minor

    III. Allegro con fuoco

    CLASS 1780: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Fingerings - 1' 22''
    Bow, Attacks - 2' 06''
    Bowings, Dynamics - 1' 18''
    Accents, Phrasing - 1' 43''
    Articulation, Dynamics - 1' 20''
    Dynamics - 1' 15''
    Bow, Attacks - 1' 31''
    Accents, Tempo - 2' 11''
    Bow, Duration - 1' 19''
    Tempo, Sound balance - 4' 46''
    Articulation, Dynamics - 2' 15''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 37''

BRAHMS, Johannes

Picture: BRAHMS, Johannes

Hamburg, 1833 - Vienna, 1897. Brahms was born in Hamburg. His father, who gave him his first music lessons, was a double bassist. Brahms showed early promise on the piano and helped to supplement the rather meager family income by playing the piano in restaurants and theaters, as well as by teaching. Although it is a widely-told tale that Brahms had to play the piano in bars and brothels, recent research, for example that by Kurt Hoffman, suggest that this is probably false. For a time, he also learned the violoncello, although his progress was cut short when his teacher absconded with Brahms's instrument. The young Brahms gave a few public concerts, but did not become well known as a pianist (although in later life he gave the premieres of both his Piano Concerto No. 1 in 1859 and his Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1881). He also began to compose, but his efforts did not receive much attention until he went on a concert tour with Eduard Reményi in 1853. On this tour he met Joseph Joachim, Franz Liszt, and later was introduced to the great German composer Robert Schumann. Reményi was, however, offended by Brahms' failure to praise Liszt's 'Sonata in B minor' wholeheartedly on a visit to the Court of Weimar where Liszt was the court musician. Many of Brahms' friends cited that Reményi, being the polished courtier, had expected the younger Brahms to conform to common practice of politely applauding a celebrity's piece which Brahms either failed to do or did not appear to do so with condescending compliment. He told Brahms that their friendship must end although it was not clear as to whether Liszt felt offended or otherwise. Joachim, however was to become one of his closest friends, and Schumann, through articles championing the young Brahms, played an important role in alerting the public to the young man's compositions. Brahms also became acquainted with Schumann's wife, the composer and pianist Clara, 14 years his senior, with whom he carried on a lifelong, emotionally passionate, but always platonic relationship. Brahms never married. In 1862 he settled permanently in Vienna and began to concentrate fully on composing. With work such as the German Requiem, Brahms eventually established a strong reputation and came to be regarded in his own lifetime as one of the great composers. This may have given him the confidence finally to complete his first symphony; this appeared in 1876, after about ten years of work. The other three symphonies then followed in fairly rapid succession (1877, 1883, 1885). Brahms frequently traveled, both for business (concert tours) and pleasure. He often visited Italy in the springtime, and usually sought out a pleasant rural location in which to compose during the summer. In 1890, the 57-year-old Brahms resolved to give up composing. However, as it turned out, he was unable to abide by his decision, and in the years before his death he produced a number of acknowledged masterpieces, including the two clarinet sonatas Op. 120 (1894) and the Four Serious Songs (Vier ernste Gesänge) Op. 121 (1896). While completing the Op. 121 songs Brahms fell ill of cancer (sources differ on whether this was of the liver or pancreas). His condition gradually worsened and he died on April 3, 1897. Brahms is buried in the Zentralfriedhof in Vienna.

Biography

  • BRAHMS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 2 in D major op 73 (double bass part)

    IV. Allegro con spirito

    CLASS 2630: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Sound quality - 1' 57''
    Part - 7' 40''
    Bowings, Duration - 1' 26''
    Phrasing, Dynamics - 2' 00''
    Dynamics, Character - 1' 11''
    Part - 6' 40''
    Staccato - 1' 19''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Character - 2' 10''
    Part - 6' 13''
    Indications for the execution - 2' 00''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Duration - 2' 10''
    Duration, Dynamics - 1' 07''

DITTERSDORF, Carl Ditters von

Picture: DITTERSDORF, Carl Ditters von

Vienna, 1739 - Neuhof, 1799. Austrian composer. He was a violinist in the Prince of Saxe-Hildburghausen's orchestra in Vienna, 1751-61, then served under Count Durazzo at the imperial court theatre. As Kapellmeister to the Bishop of Oradea, 1765-9, he wrote his first vocal works. In 1770-95 he was Kapellmeister to the Prince-Bishop of Breslau; he assembled an opera troupe and had several Italian comic operas staged. He was named Knight of the Golden Spur in 1770 and in 1773 ennobled. Beginning with the highly successful Doctor und Apotheker (1786), he wrote a series of Singspiels for Vienna; in the 1790s he wrote several for Oels. Widely renowned in his day, Dittersdorf was a major figure of the Viennese Classical school. His instrumental output includes over 40 concertos, chamber music and (most important) c 120 symphonies, including 12 based on Ovid's Metamorphoses (c 1786). Witty effects, irregular phrases and folk elements appear, and some later works are tightly and subtly constructed. Most enduring were his Singspiels, which fuse folklike and opera buffa styles. He also composed other stage works, oratorios (notably Esther, 1773), cantatas and sacred music. His memoirs provide much fascinating information about musical life in his time.

Biography

  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass part)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 1596: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Duration, Dynamics - 1' 17''
    Bow, Frog - 2' 55''
    Tempo, Strings - 1' 45''
    Sound quality - 1' 25''
  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass part)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 1965: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Bow distribution - 2' 03''
  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass part)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 1996: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Improvised cadenza, Editions - 1' 50''
    Phrasing - 2' 28''
    Character, Sound quality - 1' 12''
    Melody, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 11''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 3' 23''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 2' 36''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 51''
  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass part)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 2967: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 20' 43''
    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 20''
    Staccato, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 58''
    Bow distribution, Bow - 1' 10''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Phrasing - 3' 29''
    Bow distribution, Duration - 1' 36''
    Bow distribution, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 10''
    Trill, Bow distribution - 2' 00''
  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass part)

    II. Adagio

    CLASS 1965: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Strings, Timbre - 3' 01''
    Character, Tremolo - 1' 19''
    Indications for the execution - 2' 45''
    Character, Fingerings - 2' 28''
  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 1965: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Entries - 1' 01''
    Phrasing, Styles and periods - 3' 11''
    Character, Repertoire - 1' 32''
    Phrasing, Dynamics - 2' 41''
    Clarity of execution, Study methods - 1' 22''
    Character - 1' 57''
    Indications for the execution, Repetition - 0' 56''
    Indications for the execution - 1' 58''
    Attitude of the musician, Phrasing - 1' 22''
    Articulation, Duration - 1' 44''
    Attitude of the musician, Indications for the execution - 1' 39''
  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 2967: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 20' 12''
    Character, Tempo - 1' 05''
    Articulation - 1' 48''
    Harmonics, Indications for the execution - 1' 01''
    Staccato, Dynamics - 1' 36''
  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass and piano reduction)

    II. Adagio

    CLASS 1965: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Dynamics - 2' 49''
  • DITTERSDORF | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Concerto for double bass and orchestra no. 2 in E major (double bass and piano reduction)

    CLASS 1663: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Up-beat - 1' 28''
    Accents, Dynamics - 1' 27''
    Bow, Dynamics - 1' 09''
    Bow - 1' 25''
    Dynamics, Phrasing - 1' 11''
    Fingerings, Dynamics - 2' 46''
    Bow, Study methods - 1' 41''
    Character, Dynamics - 1' 19''
    Staccato - 2' 09''
    Bow, Character - 2' 39''
    Sound quality, Fingerings - 2' 12''
    Dynamics, Fingerings - 2' 28''
    Bowings, Dynamics - 1' 06''
    Staccato, Character - 2' 11''

ECCLES, Henry

Picture: ECCLES, Henry

London, 1670 - Paris, 1742. null

Biography

  • ECCLES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Sonata for double bass and piano in G minor (double bass part)

    I. Largo

    CLASS 2177: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Tuning - 1' 10''
    Position - 1' 30''
    Attacks, Articulation - 2' 11''
  • ECCLES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Sonata for double bass and piano in G minor (double bass part)

    II. Corrente - Largo con spirito

    CLASS 2177: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Bow - 1' 45''
    Dynamics, Bow - 2' 39''
    Sound quality, Up-beat - 3' 37''
    Sound quality, Bow - 1' 16''

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

  • GENERALITIES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Teachers advices

    CLASS 1995: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Staccato - 1' 39''
    Attitude of the musician, Technique - 1' 16''
  • GENERALITIES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Double bass Technique exercises

    CLASS 2001: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Indications for the execution - 4' 08''
  • GENERALITIES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Double bass Technique exercises

    CLASS 2165: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Right hand, Bow - 1' 26''
    Bow, Fingers - 2' 55''
    Bow, Right hand - 2' 29''
    Bow, Fingers - 4' 27''
    Bow, Wrist - 5' 21''
    Bow, Emission - 1' 22''
    Study methods, Bow - 1' 54''
    Bow, Study methods - 4' 59''
    Bow, Study methods - 3' 54''
    Maintaining the sound, Bow - 2' 15''
  • GENERALITIES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Double bass Technique exercises

    CLASS 2177: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Position, Articulation - 2' 16''
    Body movement, Position - 2' 51''
  • GENERALITIES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Double bass Technique exercises

    CLASS 2520: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 18' 26''
    Left hand, Position - 2' 03''
    Position, Body gestures - 2' 10''
    Left hand, Position - 1' 35''
    Study methods - 2' 04''
  • GENERALITIES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Double bass Technique exercises

    CLASS 2521: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 10' 34''
    Vibrato, Body gestures - 2' 37''
  • GENERALITIES | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Double bass Technique exercises

    CLASS 3070: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Bow, Bow distribution - 1' 46''
    Fingerings, Articulation - 1' 20''
    Fingerings, Shifts or changes of position - 1' 04''
    Bowings, Staccato - 1' 06''
    Attacks, Bow-strokes - 1' 21''
    Spiccato, Dynamics - 1' 24''

GLIER, Reyngol'd Moritsevich

Picture: GLIER, Reyngol'd Moritsevich

Kiev, 1875 - Moscow, 1956

Biography

  • GLIER | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Pieces for double bass and piano op 9 (double bass part)

    1. Intermezzo

    CLASS 1740: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 11''
    Phrasing, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 38''
    Sound quality, Portamento - 1' 54''
    Expressivity, Sound quality - 1' 15''
    Sound quality - 0' 57''
    Vibrato - 1' 21''
    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 50''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Vibrato - 2' 18''
    Expressivity, Articulation - 3' 15''
    Expressivity, Phrasing - 2' 31''
    Dynamics, Portamento - 1' 58''
  • GLIER | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Pieces for double bass and piano op 9 (double bass part)

    1. Intermezzo

    CLASS 1781: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Tempo - 1' 27''
    Articulation, Dynamics - 1' 12''
    Phrasing - 1' 07''
    Articulation, Fingerings - 1' 01''
    Dynamics, Phrasing - 1' 44''
    Portamento - 1' 20''
    Portamento - 1' 11''
    Tempo, Articulation - 1' 13''
    Articulation - 1' 02''
    Articulation, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 32''
    Character, Phrasing - 1' 47''
    Articulation - 0' 56''
    Character, Dynamics - 1' 22''

HINDEMITH, Paul

Picture: HINDEMITH, Paul

Hanau, 1895 - Franckfurt, 1963. Hindemith was taught the violin as a child, but his parents objected to his musical ambitions, and he left home at the age of eleven as a result. He entered the Hoch Conservatoire in Frankfurt am Main where he studied conducting, composition and violin under Arnold Mendelssohn and Bernhard Sekles, supporting himself by playing in dance bands and musical-comedy outfits. He led the Frankfurt Opera orchestra from 1915 to 1923 and played in the Rebner string quartet in 1921 in which he played second violin, and later the viola. In 1929 he founded the Amar Quartet, playing viola, and extensively touring Europe. In 1922, some of his pieces were heard in the International Society for Contemporary Music festival at Salzburg, which first brought him to the attention of an international audience. The following year, he began to work as an organiser of the Donaueschingen Festival, where he programmed works by several avant garde composers, including Anton Webern and Arnold Schoenberg. From 1927 he taught composition at Berlin and in the 1930s he made several visits to Ankara where he led the task of reorganising Turkish music education. Towards the end of the 1930s, he made several tours of America as a viola and viola d'amore soloist. Despite protests from the conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler, his music was condemned as 'degenerate' by the Nazis, and in 1940 he emigrated to the USA, where he taught music at Yale University and Harvard, and influenced younger American composers such as Harold Shapero. He became an American citizen in 1946, but returned to Europe in 1953, living in Zürich and teaching at the University there. Towards the end of his life he began to conduct more. He was awarded the Balzan Prize in 1962.

Biography

  • HINDEMITH | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Sonata for double bass and piano

    I. Allegretto

    CLASS 1740: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 39''
    Articulation, Expressivity - 1' 02''
    Phrasing - 1' 01''
    Dynamics, Articulation - 1' 01''
    Dynamics, Pizzicato - 2' 03''
    Bow - 1' 01''
    Sound balance - 1' 02''
    Bow distribution, Harmonics - 2' 16''
    Dynamics, Sound balance - 1' 28''
    Staccato, Duration - 1' 03''
  • HINDEMITH | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Sonata for double bass and piano

    II. Scherzo. Allegro assai

    CLASS 1740: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Articulation - 3' 47''
  • HINDEMITH | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Sonata for double bass and piano (double bass part)

    I. Allegretto

    CLASS 2490: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 31' 51''
    Bow distribution - 1' 12''
    Abbreviations and signs, Expressivity - 1' 05''
    Fingerings - 1' 33''
    Jumps, Articulation - 1' 23''
    Portamento, Bow distribution - 0' 59''
  • HINDEMITH | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Sonata for double bass and piano (double bass part)

    II. Scherzo. Allegro assai

    CLASS 2490: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 3' 16''
    Dynamics, Phrasing - 1' 09''
    Duration, Attacks - 1' 35''
    Part - 12' 10''
    Dynamics - 1' 30''
    Dynamics, Expressivity - 1' 14''
  • HINDEMITH | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Sonata for double bass and piano (double bass part)

    CLASS 6857: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics - 3' 55''
    Accents, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 55''
    Fingerings - 2' 36''
    Indications for the execution, Dynamics - 0' 59''
    Character, Dynamics - 2' 33''
    Position - 2' 19''
    Attitude of the musician, Sound quality - 1' 52''

KOUSSEVITZKY, Sergey

Picture: KOUSSEVITZKY, Sergey

Vishny-Volotchok, 1874 - Boston, 1951. Russian-born U.S. conductor. A virtuoso double-bass player, he was self-taught as a conductor. With his father-in-law's financial help, he debuted with the Berlin Philharmonic in 1908. In the following years he founded his own orchestra, which toured the Volga by riverboat. After leaving the Soviet Union in 1920, he established the Concerts Koussevitzky series in Paris before becoming permanent conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (1924-49). He gave about 100 premieres there, including commissioned works such as Igor Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms, and many works by U.S. composers, inspiring his musicians to legendary performances by the force of his personality. The Tanglewood Music Center in Lenox, Mass., was established during his tenure in Boston.

Biography

  • KOUSSEVITZKY | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Chanson triste for double bass and piano op 2

    CLASS 1740: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Duration, Bow distribution - 3' 14''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 45''
    Dynamics, Maintaining the sound - 2' 33''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 3' 54''
    Dynamics, Articulation - 1' 56''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 35''
    Bow, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 06''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Maintaining the sound - 1' 13''
    Duration, Bow distribution - 2' 30''
    Interpenetration - 1' 18''
    Bow distribution, Duration - 2' 27''
  • KOUSSEVITZKY | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Valse miniature for double bass and piano op 1 no. 2

    CLASS 2186: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 29' 45''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 29''
    Fingers, Tuning-fork - 1' 12''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Bow - 2' 08''

KREUTZER, Rodolphe

Picture: KREUTZER, Rodolphe

Versalles, 1766 - Geneva, 1831

Biography

  • KREUTZER | Zepperitz < Double bass

    42 Studies or caprices for violin solo (version for double bass)

    Estudio núm. 2. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 1995: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Bow, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 06''
    Accents, Character - 0' 59''
    Bow, Spiccato - 2' 13''
    Duration, Bow - 1' 11''
    Bow, Duration - 1' 23''
  • KREUTZER | Zepperitz < Double bass

    42 Studies or caprices for violin solo (version for double bass)

    Estudio núm. 2. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 2001: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Spiccato - 1' 56''
    Middle, Bow - 1' 17''
    Duration, Bow - 2' 32''
  • KREUTZER | Zepperitz < Double bass

    42 Studies or caprices for violin solo (version for double bass)

    Estudio núm. 2. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 4835: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Detaché - 1' 47''
    Dynamics, Spiccato - 2' 25''
    Articulation, Attacks - 1' 35''
    Indications for the execution - 1' 56''

MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Picture: MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Salzburg, 1756 - Vienna, 1791. Austrian composer from the Classical period. Regarded as one of the most prominent in the history of Western music. Born in Salzburg on 27 January 1756, baptized as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Studied with his father Leopold Mozart, a renowned composer and violinist who had a post at the court orchestra of the Archbishop of Salzburg. At the age of six Mozart was already a master keyboard player, an accomplished violinist, and showed extraordinary improvisation and sight-reading abilities.The five small pieces he composed at that age are still performed today. In 1762 Leopold took his son on performance tours to several courts in Europe. During that time he composed sonatas, for both hapsichord and violin (1763), a symphony (1764), an oratorio (1766) and the comic opera 'La finta semplice' (1768). In 1769 was appointed Konzertmeister at the Archbishopric of Salzburg, and at the Scala di Milano, Pope Clemens XIV created Mozart a Knight of the Golden Spur. That same year he composed 'Bastien und Bastienne', his first singspiel (an opera, usually comic and in German with spoken dialogue). The following year he was commissioned to compose his first opera, 'Mitridate, re di Ponto', which he wrote in Milan. That piece contributed to consolidate his reputation as an extraordinary musician. Mozart returned to Salzburg in 1771. His post in the city was not remunerated, but it allowed him to compose a great number of important works, that is, undermining his finances. In 1777 he was given permission to engage in a concerts tour, and he set out to Munich with his mother. At twenty-one, Mozart travelled the courts of Europe with the purpose to find a well-paid and satisfactory employment, but he didn't succeed. He went to Mannheim, the musical capital of Europe at the time, with the aim of finding a position in the orchestra, and there fell in love with Aloysia Weber. Leopold sent his wife and son to Paris. His mother's death in the French capital in 1778, together with Weber's rejection and the disdain from the aristocrats he worked for, made that two year period between his arrival in Paris and his return to Salzburg in 1779, one of the gloomiest in Mozart's life. Back in his hometown, Mozart composed two Masses and a great number of sonatas, symphonies and concertos. These works reveal, for the first time, a distinctive personal style and an exceptional musical maturity. The considerable success of his Italian opera 'Idomeneo, re di Creta', commissioned and composed in 1781, led to an invitation to visit the Archbishop of Salzburg in his palace in Vienna, but once there, Mozart felt offended at being treated like a servant and left. He then started teaching at a house that some friends rented for him. There he composed the singspiel 'Die Entführung aus dem Serail', commissioned in 1782 by Emperor Joseph II. The same year he married Constanze Weber, Alysia's younger sister; together they suffered chronic financial troubles until Mozart's death. The operas 'Le nozze di Figaro' (1786) and 'Don Giovanni' (1787), on librettos by Lorenzo Da Ponte, were not well received in Vienna in spite of having been a success in Prague. From 1787 until the creation of 'Così fan tutte' (1790, also on libretto by Da Ponte), Mozart didn't have any new commissions for operas. He composed 'La clemenza di Tito' for the coronation of emperor Leopold II in 1791, on a libretto by Metastasio. The great symphonies from 1788 No. 39 in E flat

Biography

  • MOZART | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Le nozze di Figaro K 492 (double bass part)

    Obertura

    CLASS 2578: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 4' 01''
    Duration, Articulation - 2' 15''
  • MOZART | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 35 in D major K 385 'Haffner' (double bass part)

    I. Allegro con spirito

    CLASS 1498: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Accents, Dynamics - 1' 14''
    Bow distribution, Duration - 1' 10''
    Dynamics, Strings - 1' 10''
    Staccato - 1' 04''
    Dynamics, Bow-strokes - 1' 26''
    Bow inclination, Bow - 0' 55''
    Up-beat, Indications for the execution - 2' 02''
    Bow, Duration - 1' 29''
  • MOZART | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 35 in D major K 385 'Haffner' (double bass part)

    I. Allegro con spirito

    CLASS 1966: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Themes and motifs, Duration - 1' 30''
    Duration, Bow-strokes - 1' 37''
    Staccato, Spiccato - 1' 18''
    Tempo - 0' 58''
    Fingerings, Dynamics - 1' 16''
  • MOZART | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Symphony no. 35 in D major K 385 'Haffner' (double bass part)

    IV. Finale. Presto

    CLASS 1498: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Spiccato - 1' 33''
    Spiccato, Duration - 1' 22''
    Dynamics - 0' 59''
    Dynamics, Fingerings - 1' 10''

PAGANINI, Nicolò

Picture: PAGANINI, Nicolò

Genoa, 1782 - Nice, 1840

Biography

  • PAGANINI | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Introduction and Variations on 'Dal tuo stellato soglio' from Rossini's Mosè in Egitto for violin and orchestra (version for double bass)

    Variazione II

    CLASS 1596: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Up-beat - 1' 34''
  • PAGANINI | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Introduction and Variations on 'Dal tuo stellato soglio' from Rossini's Mosè in Egitto for violin and orchestra (version for double bass and piano)

    Introduzione

    CLASS 1596: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics - 2' 27''
    Dynamics, Expressivity - 2' 13''
  • PAGANINI | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Introduction and Variations on 'Dal tuo stellato soglio' from Rossini's Mosè in Egitto for violin and orchestra (version for double bass and piano)

    Variazione III

    CLASS 1596: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Up-beat - 2' 01''

ROSSINI, Gioachino

Picture: ROSSINI, Gioachino

Pesaro, 1792 - Passy, 1868. Italian composer. He sang in church and in minor opera roles as a child, began composing at age 12, and at 14 entered Bologna's conservatory, where he wrote mostly sacred music. From 1812 he produced theatre works at a terrific rate, and for 15 years he was the dominant voice of Italian opera; his major successes included The Italian Girl in Algiers (1813), The Barber of Seville (1816), La cenerentola (1817), and Semiramide (1823). Into the genteel atmosphere of lingering 18th-century operatic manners, Rossini brought genuine originality marked by rude wit and humour and a willingness to sacrifice all "rules" of musical and operatic decorum. His career marked the zenith of the bel canto style, a singer-dominated manner of composition that emphasized vocal agility and long, florid phrasing. From 1824 he spent much time in Paris, where he wrote his masterpiece, William Tell (1829). After 1832 his health was poor, and he composed little until the series of piano pieces and songs collected as Sins of My Old Age (1868).

Biography

  • ROSSINI | Zepperitz < Chamber music

    Sonate a quattro no. 3 in C major

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 1616: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Tempo - 1' 40''
    Dynamics - 1' 06''
    Pizzicato - 1' 37''
    Dynamics - 1' 08''
  • ROSSINI | Zepperitz < Chamber music

    Sonate a quattro no. 3 in C major

    II. Andante

    CLASS 1616: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Vibrato - 1' 16''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 52''
  • ROSSINI | Zepperitz < Chamber music

    Sonate a quattro no. 3 in C major

    III. Moderato

    CLASS 1616: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo - 1' 05''
    Tempo, Character - 1' 17''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 04''
    Character, Rhythm - 1' 53''
    Tempo - 2' 00''
    Bow direction - 1' 04''
    Articulation - 1' 00''
  • ROSSINI | Zepperitz < Chamber music

    Sonate a quattro no. 6 in D major

    I. Allegro spiritoso

    CLASS 1897: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character - 1' 57''
    Indications for the execution - 2' 25''
    Vibrato - 1' 02''
  • ROSSINI | Zepperitz < Chamber music

    Sonate a quattro no. 6 in D major

    III. Allegro (Tempesta)

    CLASS 1897: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Repetition - 2' 02''
    Dynamics, Character - 4' 05''
    Character - 1' 55''

ROTA, Nino

Picture: ROTA, Nino

Milan, 1911 - Rome, 1979

Biography

  • ROTA | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Divertimento concertante for double bass and orchetra (double bass and piano reduction)

    II. Marcia

    CLASS 1496: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Duration - 0' 59''
    Dynamics, Duration - 1' 12''
    Duration, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 10''
  • ROTA | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Divertimento concertante for double bass and orchetra (double bass and piano reduction)

    II. Marcia

    CLASS 1615: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Vibrato, Soloist - 1' 21''
    Character, Indications for the execution - 1' 30''
    Fingerings, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 15''
    Dynamics, Duration - 1' 49''
    Bow distribution, Marcato - 1' 24''
    Entries - 1' 25''
    Dynamics - 1' 17''
  • ROTA | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Divertimento concertante for double bass and orchetra (double bass and piano reduction)

    II. Marcia

    CLASS 1664: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Transposition - 1' 17''
    Character, Dynamics - 1' 11''
    Dynamics, Bow direction - 1' 13''
    Dynamics - 1' 16''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Interpenetration - 1' 29''
    Glissando - 1' 17''
    Dynamics, Pizzicato - 1' 13''
  • ROTA | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Divertimento concertante for double bass and orchetra (double bass and piano reduction)

    III. Aria

    CLASS 1496: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo - 1' 19''
    Sound quality, Metrical rigor or freedom - 3' 04''
  • ROTA | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Divertimento concertante for double bass and orchetra (double bass and piano reduction)

    III. Aria

    CLASS 1615: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Dynamics - 2' 02''
    Tempo, Bow distribution - 2' 21''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 20''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Sound quality - 1' 40''
  • ROTA | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Divertimento concertante for double bass and orchetra (double bass and piano reduction)

    III. Aria

    CLASS 1664: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Attitude of the musician - 0' 57''
    Expressivity, Phrasing - 1' 06''
    Interpenetration, Dynamics - 1' 14''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Entries - 1' 21''
    Articulation - 1' 03''
    Phrasing, Tempo - 0' 58''
    Dynamics - 1' 12''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 0' 59''
  • ROTA | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Divertimento concertante for double bass and orchetra (double bass and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 1496: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 01''
    Tempo - 1' 02''
    Dynamics - 1' 24''
    Interpenetration - 1' 47''
    Bow direction - 1' 28''

SMETANA, Bedrich

Picture: SMETANA, Bedrich

Litonysl, 1824 - Prague, 1884. Czech composer, conductor and critic. The first Czech nationalist composer and the most important of the new generation of Czech opera composers writing from the 1860s. His eight operas established a canon of Czech operas to serve as models for Czech nationalist opera and have remained in the Czech repertory ever since. Such was the force of his musical personality that his musical style became synonymous with Czech nationalist style, his name a rallying point for the polemics which were to continue in Czech musical life into the next century.

Biography

  • SMETANA | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Prodana nevesta (The bartered bride) (double bass part)

    Obertura

    CLASS 1596: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Dynamics - 1' 23''
    Accents, Duration - 1' 21''
    Accents, Bow - 1' 18''

STRAUSS, Richard

Picture: STRAUSS, Richard

Munich, 1864 - Garmisch-Partenkirchen, 1949. German composer and conductor. He emerged soon after the deaths of Wagner and Brahms as the most important living German composer. During an artistic career which spanned nearly eight decades, he composed in virtually all musical genres, but became best known for his tone poems (composed during the closing years of the 19th century) and his operas (from the early decades of the 20th). Coming of age as a composer at a time when the duality of bourgeois and artist had become increasingly problematic, Strauss negotiated the worlds of art and society with a remarkable combination of candour and irony. Averse to the metaphysics of Wagner and indifferent to Mahler's philosophical intentions in music, Strauss exploited instead the paradoxes, inconsistencies and potential profundities to be found in modern, everyday life. The new possibilities he envisioned for music were exemplified in the eclecticism of the opera Der Rosenkavalier, in which the juxtaposition of contemporary with intentionally anachronistic elements creates a stylistic pluralism that adumbrates subsequent experimentation of the later 20th century.

Biography

  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Don Quixote for cello and orchestra op 35 (double bass part)

    CLASS 1497: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Accents - 1' 42''
    Character, The work - 0' 59''
    Articulation, Fingerings - 1' 15''
    Dynamics - 0' 57''
    Tempo, Description - 1' 07''
    Sound quality, Bow - 1' 02''
    Pulse, Metrics - 1' 00''
    Bow direction, Bow - 1' 12''
    Fingerings, Sforzato - 1' 57''
    Bow direction, Fingerings - 1' 51''
    Tempo, Character - 1' 26''
    Indications for the execution - 1' 16''
  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Also sprach Zarathustra for orchestra op 30 (double bass part)

    CLASS 1965: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics - 1' 02''
  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Also sprach Zarathustra for orchestra op 30 (double bass part)

    CLASS 1966: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Fingerings, Bowings - 1' 53''
    Bowings, Staccato - 1' 13''
    Dynamics - 1' 33''
    Tempo - 1' 37''
    Bow-strokes, Marcato - 1' 04''
    Pulse, Glissando - 1' 03''
    Pizzicato, Bowings - 1' 12''
    Bow direction - 1' 11''
    Study methods, Themes and motifs - 1' 27''
  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Don Juan for orchestra op 20 (double bass part)

    CLASS 1995: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Indications for the execution, Articulation - 1' 38''
    Sound quality, Staccato - 2' 07''
    Dynamics - 1' 23''
    Bow, Attacks - 1' 31''
    Fingerings - 1' 44''
    Dynamics, Duration - 1' 00''
    Tempo, Dynamics - 0' 59''
    Dynamics, Vibrato - 1' 22''
    Duration, Spiccato - 2' 42''
  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche for orchestra op 28 (double bass part)

    CLASS 1996: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Spiccato, Tempo - 1' 00''
    Bow-strokes, Dynamics - 1' 27''
    Dynamics, Duration - 2' 06''
    Fingerings, Spiccato - 1' 11''
    Character, Fingerings - 1' 06''
    Dynamics, Indications for the execution - 3' 05''
  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Don Juan for orchestra op 20 (double bass part)

    CLASS 2001: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Duration, Bow - 1' 16''
    Tempo - 1' 01''
  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Don Juan for orchestra op 20 (double bass part)

    CLASS 2530: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 7' 56''
    Bow - 2' 12''
    Sound quality, Bow - 1' 06''
    Fingerings, Accents - 1' 22''
    Part - 33' 06''
    Dynamics, Character - 1' 50''
    Rhythm, Bow - 1' 08''
    Attacks, Bow - 1' 46''
  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Tod und Verklärung for orchestra op 24 (double bass part)

    CLASS 2531: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 16' 18''
    Part - 16' 19''
    Character, Attacks - 1' 16''
  • STRAUSS | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Don Juan for orchestra op 20 (double bass part)

    CLASS 2578: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 12' 57''
    Bow distribution, Accents - 2' 10''
    Character, Tempo - 1' 44''
    Attacks, Duration - 2' 29''
    Attacks, Bow distribution - 1' 50''
    Part - 3' 03''
    Study methods, Spiccato - 1' 09''
    Bow distribution, Phrasing - 1' 51''

VERDI, Giuseppe

Picture: VERDI, Giuseppe

Roncole, nr Busseto, 1813 - Milan, 1901

Biography

  • VERDI | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Otello (double bass part)

    Obertura

    CLASS 1596: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Dynamics - 2' 04''
    Sound quality, Dynamics - 3' 13''
    Tempo, Dynamics - 1' 45''

WAGNER, Richard

Picture: WAGNER, Richard

Leipzig, 1813 - Venice, 1883. Composer. One of the key figures in the history of opera, Wagner was largely responsible for altering its orientation in the 19th century. His programme of artistic reform, though not executed to the last detail, accelerated the trend towards organically conceived, through-composed structures, as well as influencing the development of the orchestra, of a new breed of singer, and of various aspects of theatrical practice.

Biography

  • WAGNER | Zepperitz < Double bass

    Die Walküre (double bass part)

    "Einen Unseligen labtest du"

    CLASS 2578: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 28' 05''
    Bow direction, Dynamics - 1' 34''
    Fingerings, Indications for the execution - 1' 27''
    Fingerings, Sound quality - 1' 00''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Jumps - 1' 57''
    Articulation, Bow distribution - 1' 19''
    Attacks, Fingerings - 1' 00''
    Fingerings - 1' 45''
    Bow distribution, Tempo - 1' 05''
    Fingerings - 1' 00''

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