VIDEO MASTER CLASSES

Sort by

Filter by

Original Version

Dubbings

  • TEACHER
  • COMPOSER
  • CLASS

Soriano, Joaquín

Picture: Soriano, Joaquín

León (Spain), 1941. Joaquin Soriano, one of the most celebrated pianists Spain has produced, came into the limelight when he was still young. He studied with Magenti in Valencia, Perlemuter and Henelin in Paris, and Brendel in Vienna. He first won the grand prize in Vercelli in 1959 and won more grand prizes in Jaen, Naples, Casella, and Pozzoli. His technically polished performance at the Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw eventually became his first album record. Gradually, he expanded his passionate performance activities to other Continents as a solo pianist. He played with various prestigious orchestras such as Spain National Symphony, Spain Radio-Television Symphony, France National Symphony, RAI, Halle Orchestra, Royal Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, English Chamber Orchestra (with which he played Falla and Turina for CD recordings), Koln Gurzenich, Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, New York Chamber Orchestra, Israel National Symphony, Mexico National Symphony and Brazil Symphony. He also played in Dallas and Buenos Aires as well as at the Granada Music Festival. He made highly acclaimed tours in the United States, Japan, and the former Soviet Union (1980). In addition, his solo performances were recorded by BBC for TV and radio broadcasts in Europe and the United States. As a professor, he taught at Juilliard School, Menendez Pelayo University (in Santander), in Tokyo as well as Madrid Conservatory and Manhattan School of Music. As the chairman of the jury, he has served in the International Tchaikovsky Competition, the Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition, and the Van Cliburn Competition, along with other various competitions held in Iturbi, Santander, Leeds, Dublin, and at Paris Conservatoire de Musique. His CD albums cover Soirees de Vienne by Schubert and Liszt, Iberia by Albeniz, Homage by Vines, Piano Trio by Turina (recorded with Trio de Madrid) as well as pieces by Falla, Mompou, Chopin, Schumann and Rachmaninov. He is currently working on recordings of Mozart chamber music with Telos Academy in Koln. He is also re-recording Noches en los jardines de Espana with Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos and ONE for a newer version of a CD. Joaquin Soriano is a member of San Fernando Academy in Madrid.

Biography

ALBÉNIZ, Isaac

Picture: ALBÉNIZ, Isaac

Camprodón, 1860 - Cambo-les-Bains, 1909. Born in Camprodon, province of Girona, to Ángel Albéniz (a customs official) and his wife Dolors Pascual, Albéniz was a child prodigy who first performed at the age of four. At age seven, after apparently taking lessons from Antoine Marmontel, he passed the entrance examination for piano at the Paris Conservatoire, but he was refused admission because he was believed to be too young. His concert career began at the young age of nine when his father toured both Isaac and his sister, Clementina, throughout northern Spain. By the time he had reached 12, he had made many attempts to run away from home. At the age of 12 he stowed away in a ship bound for Buenos Aires. He then made his way via Cuba to the United States, giving concerts in New York and San Francisco and then travelled to Liverpool, London and Leipzig. By age 15, he had already given concerts worldwide. After a short stay at the Leipzig Conservatory, in 1876 he went to study in Brussels. In 1880, he went to Budapest to study with Franz Liszt, only to find out that Liszt was in Weimar, Germany. In 1883, he met the teacher and composer Felip Pedrell, who inspired him to write Spanish music such as the Chants d'Espagne. The first movement (Prelude) of that suite, later retitled after the composer's death as Asturias (Leyenda), is probably most famous today as part of the classical guitar repertoire, even though it was originally composed for piano and only later transcribed. (Many of Albéniz's other compositions were also transcribed for guitar, notably by Francisco Tárrega — Albéniz once declared that he preferred Tárrega's guitar transcriptions to his original piano works). At the 1888 Universal Exposition in Barcelona, the piano manufacturer Erard sponsored a series of 20 concerts featuring Albéniz's music. The apex of his concert career is considered to be 1889 to 1892 when he had concert tours throughout Europe. During the 1890s Albéniz lived in London and Paris. For London he wrote some musical comedies which brought him to the attention of the wealthy Francis Money-Coutts, 5th Baron Latymer. Money-Coutts commissioned and provided him with librettos for the opera Henry Clifford and for a projected trilogy of Arthurian operas. The first of these, Merlin (1898–1902) was thought to have been lost, but has recently been reconstructed and successfully performed; Albéniz never completed Lancelot (only the first act is finished, as a vocal and piano score), and he never began Guinevere, the final part. In 1900 he started to suffer from Bright's disease and returned to writing piano music. Between 1905 and 1908 he composed his final masterpiece, Iberia (1908), a suite of twelve piano "impressions". In 1883, the composer married his student Rosina Jordana. They had three children, Blanca (who died in 1886), Laura (a painter), and Alfonso (who played for Real Madrid in the early 1900s before embarking on a career as a diplomat). Two other children died in infancy. Albéniz died on 18 May 1909 at age 48 in Cambo-les-Bains of Bright's disease, and is buried in the Cementiri del Sudoest at Monjuïc, Barcelona.

Biography

  • ALBÉNIZ | Soriano < Piano

    Iberia for piano solo T 105

    Rondeña

    CLASS 2361: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Homophony, Attacks - 1' 24''
    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 40''
    Dynamics, Character - 1' 42''
    Clarity of execution, Character - 1' 58''

BACH, Johann Sebastian

Picture: BACH, Johann Sebastian

Eisenach, 1685 - Leipzig, 1750. Born into a musical family, Bach received his earliest instruction from his father. After his father's death in 1695, Bach moved to Ohrdruf, where he lived and studied organ with his older brother Johann Christoph. He also received an education at schools in Eisenach, Ohrdruf, and Lüneburg. Bach's first permanent positions were as organist in Arnstadt (1703-1707) and Mühlhausen (1707-1708). During these years, he performed, composed taught, and developed an interest in organ building. From 1708-1717 he was employed by Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar, first as court organist, and after 1714, as concertmaster. During this period, he composed many of his best organ compositions; in his capacity as concertmaster, he was also expected to produce a cantata each month. In Weimar, Bach's style was influenced by his study of numerous Italian compositions (especially Vivaldi concertos). Bach's next position, as Music Director for the Prince Leopold of Cüthen (1717-1723), involved entirely different activities. Since the court chapel was Calvinist, there was no need for church compositions; Bach probably used the Cüthen organs only for teaching and practice. His new works were primarily for instrumental solo or ensemble, to be used as court entertainment or for instruction. Among the important compositions at Cüthen were the Brandenburg Concertos, the first volume of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (The Well-Tempered Clavier), the "French" and "English" Suites for harpsichord (although the "English" Suites may be from the Weimar period), and most of the sonatas and suites for other instruments. In 1723, Bach was appointed cantor at the St. Thomas Church and School, and Director of Music for Leipzig, positions which he retained for the rest of his career. His official duties included the responsibility of overseeing the music in the four principal churches of the city, and organizing other musical events sponsored by the municipal council. During his first six years in Leipzig (1723-1729), Bach's most impressive compositions were his sacred cantatas (four yearly cycles), and the St. John and St. Matthew Passions. Bach apparently gave virtuoso organ recitals in Leipzig and on various tours, although he had no official position as organist in Leipzig. In 1729-1737 and 1739-1741, he was director of the Leipzig Collegium Musicum, an organization which had been founded by Telemann in 1704. This group of professional musicians and university students performed weekly concerts (out-of-doors in the summer, and at Zimmerman's coffee-house in the winter). Although no specific programs for these concerts have survived, Bach apparently revived and many of his instrumental compositions from Cüthen, wrote new works (e.g., secular cantatas), and conducted pieces by other composers. During the 1730s, Bach renewed his interest in keyboard compositions, and prepared the first three volumes of his Clavier-Übung (Keyboard Practice) for publication (1731, 1735, 1739); the fourth volume appeared in 1741-1742. In the 1730s, he also showed considerable interest in the royal court at Dresden, and was named "Hofkomponist" (court-composer") in Dresden in 1736. During Bach's last decade (the 1740s), he completed or revised several large-scale projects which he had started earlier. The Well-Tempered Clavier, Vol. II; a manuscript collection of chorale preludes (known as the "Leipzig 18", comprising revisions of Weimar pieces), and the B minor Mass. Other new works showed

Biography

  • BACH | Soriano < Piano

    Capriccio on the Departure of his Most Beloved Brother for keyboard in B flat major BWV 992

    I. Arioso. Adagio

    CLASS 2350: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Styles and periods - 1' 28''
    Styles and periods, Polyphony - 2' 31''
    Articulation, Phrasing - 1' 46''
  • BACH | Soriano < Piano

    Capriccio on the Departure of his Most Beloved Brother for keyboard in B flat major BWV 992

    II. Fugato

    CLASS 2350: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Articulation, Polyphony - 1' 42''
    Attitude of the musician, Sound planes - 1' 48''
  • BACH | Soriano < Piano

    Capriccio on the Departure of his Most Beloved Brother for keyboard in B flat major BWV 992

    IV. Marschmaessig

    CLASS 2350: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Pedal, Sound planes - 2' 32''
  • BACH | Soriano < Piano

    Capriccio on the Departure of his Most Beloved Brother for keyboard in B flat major BWV 992

    VI. Fuga

    CLASS 2350: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Articulation - 2' 14''
    Articulation, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 41''
    Dynamics, Sound planes - 1' 23''

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 31 in A flat major op 110

    I. Moderato cantabile molto espressivo

    CLASS 2340: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Duration - 2' 25''
    Attacks, Articulation - 1' 20''
    Dynamics, Fingerings - 1' 16''
    Character, Tempo - 1' 51''
    Voice identification, Pedal - 1' 33''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 16''
    Attitude of the musician, Left hand - 3' 29''
    Tempo, Indications for the execution - 2' 16''
    Tempo, Metronome - 1' 38''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 31 in A flat major op 110

    II. Allegro molto

    CLASS 2340: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Articulation, Left hand - 1' 15''
    Expressivity, Rigor or freedom in reading - 1' 17''
    Attitude of the musician, Phrasing - 1' 43''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 31 in A flat major op 110

    III. Adagio, ma non troppo (Arioso dolente)

    CLASS 2340: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Articulation, Jumps - 1' 17''
    Fingerings - 1' 27''
    Fingerings, Harmony - 1' 26''
    Tempo, Attention to the text - 2' 13''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 31 in A flat major op 110

    IV. Fuga. Allegro, ma non troppo

    CLASS 2339: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Personality - 2' 03''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 31 in A flat major op 110

    IV. Fuga. Allegro, ma non troppo

    CLASS 2340: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Voice identification - 1' 23''
    Dynamics, Left hand - 1' 40''
    Attitude of the musician, Character - 2' 32''
    Dynamics, Expressivity - 1' 32''
    Dynamics, Expressivity - 2' 04''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 15 in D major op 28

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 2176: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Attacks, Pedal - 1' 30''
    Articulation, Sforzato - 1' 29''
    Articulation, Sound quality - 2' 37''
    Attitude of the musician, Character - 1' 58''
    Dynamics, Study methods - 1' 38''
    Sound quality, Sound balance - 1' 57''
    Dynamics, Articulation - 1' 36''
    Indications for the execution, Contrast - 3' 20''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 15 in D major op 28

    II. Andante

    CLASS 2176: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound balance, Tempo - 3' 16''
    Pedal, Sound balance - 1' 55''
    Tension, Articulation - 1' 41''
    Pedal, Sound quality - 2' 57''
    Dynamics - 2' 05''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Pedal - 1' 03''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 15 in D major op 28

    III. Scherzo-Allegro vivace

    CLASS 2176: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Timbre, Styles and periods - 1' 15''
    Duration, Pedal - 1' 36''
    Phrasing, Repetition - 2' 54''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 15 in D major op 28

    IV. Rondo-Allegro ma non troppo

    CLASS 2176: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Accents, Pedal - 1' 27''
    Accents, Expressivity - 2' 25''
    Attitude of the musician, Sound balance - 2' 03''
    Dynamics - 1' 15''
    Pedal, Sound quality - 1' 52''
    Maintaining the sound, Expressivity - 1' 19''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 27 in E minor op 90

    I. Mit Lebhaftigkeit und durchaus mit Empfindung und Ausdruck

    CLASS 2354: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Expressivity, The work - 1' 30''
    Rhythm, Contrast - 1' 25''
    Hands, Pedal - 1' 29''
    Expressivity, Sforzato - 1' 41''
    Expressivity, Tempo - 1' 12''
    Attacks, Sforzato - 1' 11''
    Voice identification, Clarity of execution - 1' 08''
    Accents, Cadence - 1' 04''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Tempo - 1' 00''
    Recapitulation, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 45''
  • BEETHOVEN | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 15 in D major op 28

    CLASS 2176: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Timbre - 1' 51''
    Attitude of the musician, Study methods - 0' 50''

BRAHMS, Johannes

Picture: BRAHMS, Johannes

Hamburg, 1833 - Vienna, 1897. Brahms was born in Hamburg. His father, who gave him his first music lessons, was a double bassist. Brahms showed early promise on the piano and helped to supplement the rather meager family income by playing the piano in restaurants and theaters, as well as by teaching. Although it is a widely-told tale that Brahms had to play the piano in bars and brothels, recent research, for example that by Kurt Hoffman, suggest that this is probably false. For a time, he also learned the violoncello, although his progress was cut short when his teacher absconded with Brahms's instrument. The young Brahms gave a few public concerts, but did not become well known as a pianist (although in later life he gave the premieres of both his Piano Concerto No. 1 in 1859 and his Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1881). He also began to compose, but his efforts did not receive much attention until he went on a concert tour with Eduard Reményi in 1853. On this tour he met Joseph Joachim, Franz Liszt, and later was introduced to the great German composer Robert Schumann. Reményi was, however, offended by Brahms' failure to praise Liszt's 'Sonata in B minor' wholeheartedly on a visit to the Court of Weimar where Liszt was the court musician. Many of Brahms' friends cited that Reményi, being the polished courtier, had expected the younger Brahms to conform to common practice of politely applauding a celebrity's piece which Brahms either failed to do or did not appear to do so with condescending compliment. He told Brahms that their friendship must end although it was not clear as to whether Liszt felt offended or otherwise. Joachim, however was to become one of his closest friends, and Schumann, through articles championing the young Brahms, played an important role in alerting the public to the young man's compositions. Brahms also became acquainted with Schumann's wife, the composer and pianist Clara, 14 years his senior, with whom he carried on a lifelong, emotionally passionate, but always platonic relationship. Brahms never married. In 1862 he settled permanently in Vienna and began to concentrate fully on composing. With work such as the German Requiem, Brahms eventually established a strong reputation and came to be regarded in his own lifetime as one of the great composers. This may have given him the confidence finally to complete his first symphony; this appeared in 1876, after about ten years of work. The other three symphonies then followed in fairly rapid succession (1877, 1883, 1885). Brahms frequently traveled, both for business (concert tours) and pleasure. He often visited Italy in the springtime, and usually sought out a pleasant rural location in which to compose during the summer. In 1890, the 57-year-old Brahms resolved to give up composing. However, as it turned out, he was unable to abide by his decision, and in the years before his death he produced a number of acknowledged masterpieces, including the two clarinet sonatas Op. 120 (1894) and the Four Serious Songs (Vier ernste Gesänge) Op. 121 (1896). While completing the Op. 121 songs Brahms fell ill of cancer (sources differ on whether this was of the liver or pancreas). His condition gradually worsened and he died on April 3, 1897. Brahms is buried in the Zentralfriedhof in Vienna.

Biography

  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 3 in F minor op 5

    I. Allegro maestoso

    CLASS 2347: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Character - 1' 23''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 3 in F minor op 5

    II. Andante

    CLASS 2347: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 0' 58''
    Tempo - 2' 17''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 3 in F minor op 5

    V. Finale. Allegro moderato ma rubato

    CLASS 2347: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Tempo - 1' 21''
    Character, Tempo - 1' 08''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Concerto for piano no. 1 in D minor op 15

    I. Maestoso

    CLASS 4843: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Expressivity - 2' 20''
    Expressivity, Dynamics - 2' 22''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Concerto for piano no. 1 in D minor op 15

    II. Adagio

    CLASS 4843: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Phrasing - 1' 42''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Concerto for piano no. 1 in D minor op 15

    III. Rondo. Allegro non troppo

    CLASS 4843: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Relaxation, Phrasing - 0' 56''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Pieces for piano op 118

    1. Intermezzo, in A minor

    CLASS 2357: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Phrasing, Character - 3' 07''
    Dynamics, Attitude of the musician - 1' 19''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Pieces for piano op 118

    2. Intermezzo, in A major

    CLASS 2357: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Pedal, Tempo - 2' 53''
    Tempo, Tension - 3' 06''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Pieces for piano op 118

    4. Intermezzo, in F minor

    CLASS 2357: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Expressivity, Personality - 2' 54''
  • BRAHMS | Soriano < Piano

    Pieces for piano op 118

    5. Romance, in F major

    CLASS 2357: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Main melody, Expressivity - 2' 06''
    Articulation, Phrasing - 0' 55''
    Tempo, Phrasing - 1' 52''

CHOPIN, Fryderyck Franciszek

Picture: CHOPIN, Fryderyck Franciszek

Zelazowa Wola, 1810 - Paris, 1849. Frédéric Chopin, a Polish composer and pianist, was one of the creators of the typically romantic character piece. All of his works include the piano. He was born on February 22, 1810, near Warsaw, Poland. At an early age, Chopin displayed artistic talents&#151;he was an artist, wrote poetry, and played piano without any formal instruction. The gifted child also began composing his own music and had his first piece of music published when he was just seven years old. In 1826 Chopin became a full-time student at Elsner's conservatory, where he received an excellent foundation in theory, harmony, and melody. Elsner, after recognizing that Chopin's style was too original to force into traditional patterns, granted Chopin the freedom to develop along clear personal lines. After visiting Berlin, Germany, where Chopin was exposed to the music of George Frederick Handel (1685-1759) and Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847), Chopin returned to Warsaw and heard Nicolò Paganini (1782-1840). Chopin recognized that he must leave Warsaw for exposure to other musicians. He went to Vienna, Austria, to try to arrange the publication of several of his works. After a successful debut at the Kärntnerthor Theater on August 11, 1829, he returned home only to prepare for a concert tour, this time through Germany and Italy. In Vienna Chopin composed the B Minor Scherzo and the G Minor Ballade, as well as others that demonstrated Chopin's fully developed personal style. When the twenty-year-old Chopin arrived in Paris, poor physical health prevented him from giving public performances. Nevertheless, he became a significant figure in Parisian artistic circles, numbering among his friends musicians, writers, and painters, as well as many wealthy and talented women. Chopin recognized that he did not have the stamina (strength) to compete in public against such talents as Franz Liszt (1811-1886) and Sigismund Thalberg (1812-1871). So long as he was able to earn enough by teaching, Chopin preferred composition to playing concerts. His musical tastes were public knowledge. Friendly with Hector Berlioz (1803-1869) and Mendelssohn, he was not impressed with their music. Nor, for that matter, did he appreciate Robert Schumann's (1810-1856) work, despite Schumann's warm welcome written for the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik when Chopin first arrived in Paris. Schumann introduced Clara Wieck to Chopin's work, and eventually her performances of Chopin's pieces made favorable impressions on many audiences. Several young ladies appear to have been the object of Chopin's affections over the years, but the most celebrated female with whom he had a relationship was Aurore Dudevant, known as George Sand, whom he met in 1836. For nine years, beginning in 1838, after he had composed the "Funeral March" (which later became part of the B-flat Minor Sonata), she was his closest associate. Despite failing health, the composer completed his twenty-four Preludes in Valldemosa, Majorca (one of the Balearic Islands in the western Mediterranean). In 1846 Sand's children became a problem. Chopin sided with Solange, Sand's daughter, in arguments against Sand and her son, Maurice. Separation became inevitable, and the beginning of the end for Chopin. His health failed, and he lost all interest in composition. Chopin then moved to England, where he gave several private performances in London and on May 15 played for Queen Victoria (1819-1901). After a rest in Scotland, he retu

Biography

  • CHOPIN | Soriano < Piano

    Polonaise-fantaisie for piano solo in A flat major op 61

    CLASS 2358: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    The work, Relaxation - 1' 11''
    Tempo, Introduction - 1' 54''
    Character, Pedal - 1' 00''
    Indications for the execution, Sound quality - 0' 54''
    Main melody, Duration - 1' 27''
    Tempo, Pedal - 1' 43''
    Pedal, Phrasing - 1' 40''
    Attacks, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 23''
    Pedal, Arm - 1' 27''
    Sound quality, Pedal - 1' 30''
    Phrasing, Dynamics - 3' 42''
    Dynamics, Pedal - 1' 26''
    Duration, Attacks - 2' 03''
    Dynamics, Entries - 1' 39''
    Arm, Study methods - 1' 42''

FALLA, Manuel de

Picture: FALLA, Manuel de

Cádiz, 1876 - Alta Gracia, 1946. Spanish composer, born in Cádiz in 1876. Together with Catalonian Isaac Albéniz and Enrique Granados, is the third of the names that make up the great triad of Spanish nationalistic music. He was also among the first composers in this tradition who, with a distinctive Spanish style, and yet devoid of any clichés, found the way to be popular throughout Europe and America, and by doing so overcame the isolation and subordination to other traditions to which Spanish music seemed to be doomed since the eighteenth century. He was never a prolific composer but his creations, all of a high degree of perfection, enjoy a privileged position within the repertoire. He received his first music lessons from his mother, an excelent pianist who noticed her son's undeniable gift and entrusted his education to the best teachers. After studying harmony, counterpoint and composition in his hometown with Alejandro Odero and Enrique Broca, De Falla went to the Madrid Conservatory where he studied with José Tragó and Felip Pedrell. The latter's influence was decisive in the conformation of his aesthetics: it was he who introduced him to the study of Spanish autochtonous music, so important in Falla's works of maturity. After a few zarzuelas, nowadays lost or forgotten like 'Los amores de Inés', the years of study in Madrid culminated in the composition of the opera 'La vida breve', which won the First Prize at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando composition contest . Even though the rules stated that the winning work was to be performed at Madrid's Teatro Real, the premiere did not take place until eight years later, not in Madrid but in Nice (France). France was, precisely, where Falla continued his education: lived in Paris since 1907, and met Debussy, Ravel, Dukas and Albéniz, who made their mark on that period's compositions, 'Noches en los jardines de España' in particular is a piece of unmistakable Spanish aroma and yet a somehow impressionistic instrumentation. Falla's creative maturity coincides with his return to Spain in 1914. It was the period in which he composed his most celebrated works: 'El amor brujo', 'El sombrero de tres picos' (composed on commission by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes), 'Siete canciones populares españolas' for voice and piano and 'Fantasía Bética' for piano. These compositions show the evolution of de Falla's style from the folkloric nationalism of the first scores, inspired on Andalusian and Castilian themes, melodies and twists, towards a nationalism grounded on Spanish Siglo de Oro musical tradition, represented in the opera 'El retablo de Maese Pedro', one of his mastepieces, and in the 'Concerto' for hapsichord and five instruments. While in former works Falla had displayed a broad palette of sounds, a direct result of the French influence, in his late compositions his style became austere and concise, especially in the 'Concerto'. Falla spent the last twenty years of his life working on what he thought was his masterpiece: the scenic cantata 'La Atlántida', on text by Catalan nationalist poet Jacint Verdaguer, on a theme that he had been obsessed with since childhood and which reflected all his philiosophical, religious and humanistic concerns. When the Spanish Civil War broke out he travelled to Argentina, where he died leaving his last work unfinished. The task of completing 'La Atlántida' from De Falla's drafts fell on his pupil Ernesto Halffter.

Biography

  • FALLA | Soriano < Piano

    Fantasía bética for piano

    CLASS 2359: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Fingerings, Tempo - 1' 11''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Apoggiatura - 1' 03''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Sound quality - 1' 25''
    Mordent, Indications for the execution - 3' 44''

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

GRANADOS, Enrique

Picture: GRANADOS, Enrique

Lerida, 1867 - Canal de la Mancha, 1916. Enrique Granados Campiña was born on the 27 July 1867 in Lérida. His father was a Cuban-born army officer. He began his music education at an early age. Studied piano in Barcelona with Joan Baptista Pujol. Pujol had been a student of Pere Tintorer, a Majorcan pianist who worked with Liszt. Pujol is also the creator what is known as the first Catalan piano tradition. Albéniz, Malats (Mompou's teacher) and Ricard Viñes, were some of his numerous pupils. In 1887 Granados travelled to Paris to study with Charles de Beriot. There, he maintained his friendship with Albéniz, Nin and Viñes, and at the same time had direct contact with the most important French composers of that period, Fauré, Debussy, Ravel, Dukas, d'Indy, and had a close relationship with Camille Saint-Saëns. Returned to Barcelona in 1889 to begin a career as a piano virtuoso and composer. In 1892 gave his first public performance of Grieg's Piano Concerto in Spain. During that period, he appeared in many chamber music concerts with close friends like Pau Casals, Mathieu Crickboom, Jacques Thibaud, Emil von Sauer and Camille Saint-Saëns. Between 1895 and 1898 premiered several of his stage works, 'Miel de Alcarria', 'María del Carmen', and a number of chamber and piano pieces. In 1901 founded the Granados Academy, which became a landmark in the art of piano performance, as understood by Granados. Granados and his wife Amparo died after drowning when the Sussex, the boat in which they travelled from London to Barcelona (the last leg of their return journey after the premiere in New York of the acclaimed opera 'Goyescas') was struck by a torpedo in the English Channel. Granados directed the Academy until his death, and was succeeded by his pupil and friend Frank Marshall. To avoid inheritance problems after Granados' sudden death, Marshall and the Academy Chair Felipe Pedrell changed the academy name to Marshall Academy, which made Marshall its sole proprietor. Together with Albéniz and Falla, Granados is frequently recognised as a nacionalist composer. Nowadays his very personal romantic style would be best described by the term neo-romantic. An expressive style influenced by Chopin, Schumann, Schubert and Grieg, and Goya's 'Majas' from the 18th century.

Biography

  • GRANADOS | Soriano < Piano

    Goyescas, o Los majos enamorados for piano

    6. Epílogo, serenata del espectro

    CLASS 2053: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Phrasing, Accents - 0' 53''
    Dynamics, Phrasing - 1' 10''
    Indications for the execution - 0' 53''
    Phrasing, Timbre - 2' 23''
    Fingerings - 1' 08''

LISZT, Franz

Picture: LISZT, Franz

Raiding (Doborján), 1811 - Bayreuth, 1886. Hungarian composer, pianist and teacher. He was one of the leaders of the Romantic movement in music. In his compositions he developed new methods, both imaginative and technical, which left their mark upon his forward-looking contemporaries and anticipated some 20th-century ideas and procedures; he also evolved the method of 'transformation of themes' as part of his revolution in form, made radical experiments in harmony and invented the symphonic poem for orchestra. As the greatest piano virtuoso of his time, he used his sensational technique and captivating concert personality not only for personal effect but to spread, through his transcriptions, knowledge of other composers' music. As a conductor and teacher, especially at Weimar, he made himself the most influential figure of the New German School dedicated to progress in music. His unremitting championship of Wagner and Berlioz helped these composers achieve a wider European fame. Equally important was his unrivalled commitment to preserving and promoting the best of the past, including Bach, Handel, Schubert, Weber and above all Beethoven; his performances of such works as Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and Hammerklavier Sonata created new audiences for music hitherto regarded as incomprehensible. The seeming contradictions in his personal life a strong religious impulse mingled with a love of worldly sensation were resolved by him with difficulty. Yet the vast amount of new biographical information makes the unthinking view of him as 'half gypsy, half priest' impossible to sustain. He contained in his character more of the ideals and aspirations of the 19th century than any other major musician.

Biography

  • LISZT | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano in B minor S 178

    I. Lento assai - Allegro energico - Grandioso

    CLASS 2342: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 15''
    Voice identification, The work - 1' 44''
    Articulation, Silence - 1' 07''
    Dynamics, Syncopation - 1' 26''
    Dynamics, Syncopation - 3' 03''
    Expressivity, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 42''
    Attitude of the musician, Dynamics - 1' 17''
    Dynamics, Clarity of execution - 2' 33''
    Attitude of the musician, Dynamics - 1' 35''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Main melody - 1' 20''
    Phrasing, Dynamics - 1' 00''
    Articulation, Character - 1' 24''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Duration - 1' 04''
    Ornamentation, Ending of the sound - 1' 42''
    Tempo, Silence - 2' 38''
    Harmonic process, Main melody - 2' 10''
    Attitude of the musician, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 19''
    Dynamics, Main melody - 1' 54''
    Attitude of the musician, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 51''
    Clarity of execution, Pedal - 1' 15''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Rigor or freedom in reading - 1' 07''
    Octaves, Pedal - 1' 18''
    Phrasing, Sound quality - 1' 22''
    Phrasing, Recitative - 1' 07''
    Attitude of the musician, Attention to the text - 1' 38''
  • LISZT | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano in B minor S 178

    III. Allegro energico - Andante sostenuto - Lento assai

    CLASS 2342: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Dynamics - 3' 52''
  • LISZT | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano in B minor S 178

    II. Andante sostenuto

    CLASS 2342: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Fugue, Character - 2' 10''
    Dynamics, Attacks - 2' 42''
  • LISZT | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano in B minor S 178

    CLASS 2179: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Tempo - 1' 41''
    Harmony - 2' 29''
    Fingerings, Sound quality - 1' 10''
    Tempo, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 03''
    Clarity of execution, Phrasing - 1' 38''
    Main melody, Expressivity - 1' 14''
    Tension, Character - 1' 43''
    Character, The work - 2' 10''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 2' 40''
    Character, Sound quality - 1' 48''
    Dynamics, Phrasing - 1' 09''
    Tempo, Character - 1' 37''
    Jumps, Metrical rigor or freedom - 0' 58''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Rhythm - 1' 06''
    Rhythm, Main melody - 2' 00''
    Sound quality, Mutes - 1' 49''
    Attitude of the musician, Phrasing - 3' 15''
    Clarity of execution, Melodic rigor or freedom - 1' 59''
    Character, Melodic rigor or freedom - 2' 32''
  • LISZT | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano in B minor S 178

    CLASS 2342: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Sound quality - 1' 27''
  • LISZT | Soriano < Piano

    Hungarian Rhapsody for piano in C sharp minor S 244 no. 12

    CLASS 2346: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Metrical rigor or freedom, Sound balance - 1' 28''
    Character, Marcato - 3' 42''
    Pedal, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 09''
    Chords, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 07''
    Dynamics, Pedal - 1' 01''
    Character, Clarity of execution - 1' 15''
    Sound balance - 1' 16''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Character - 1' 23''
    Phrasing, Character - 1' 52''
    Articulation, Pedal - 1' 25''
    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 02''
    Pedal, Character - 1' 43''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 1' 34''
    Phrasing, Dynamics - 1' 28''
    Attitude of the musician, Tempo - 1' 55''
  • LISZT | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano in B minor S 178

    CLASS 2353: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Evenness - 1' 35''
    Tempo, Articulation - 1' 08''
    Fingerings, Ornamentation - 1' 11''
    Accents, Tempo - 2' 30''
    Attitude of the musician - 1' 02''
    Fingerings, Phrasing - 1' 40''
    Tempo, Main melody - 1' 47''
    Attitude of the musician, Dynamics - 1' 08''
    Fingerings, Evenness - 2' 35''
    Apoggiatura, Styles and periods - 1' 34''

MENDELSSOHN, Felix

Picture: MENDELSSOHN, Felix

Hamburg, 1809 - Leipzig, 1847. Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born, and generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period. The grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, he was born into a notable Jewish family, although he himself was brought up initially without religion, and later as a Lutheran Christian. He was recognized early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalise on his abilities. Indeed his father was disinclined to allow Felix to follow a musical career until it became clear that he intended seriously to dedicate himself to it. Early success in Germany was followed by travel throughout Europe; Mendelssohn was particularly well received in Britain as a composer, conductor and soloist, and his ten visits there (during which many of his major works were premiered) form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes however set him apart from many of his more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Liszt, Wagner and Berlioz. The Conservatory he founded at Leipzig became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook. Mendelssohn's work includes symphonies, concerti, oratorios, piano and chamber music. He also had an important role in the revival of interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality is now being recognized and re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the Romantic era.

Biography

  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Andante sostenuto

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Tempo, Styles and periods - 2' 10''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Variación II

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Attacks - 2' 02''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 1' 54''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Variación III

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Pedal, Staccato - 1' 11''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Variación V

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Indications for the execution - 2' 19''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Variación VIII

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Duration, Ending of the sound - 3' 13''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Variación X

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Voice identification, Attacks - 1' 47''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Variación XII

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Pedal, Tempo - 1' 31''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Variación XIV

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Voice identification, Dynamics - 2' 36''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Variación XVI

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Phrasing, Indications for the execution - 2' 49''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Soriano < Piano

    Variations sérieuses for piano solo in D minor op 54

    Presto

    CLASS 2341: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Accents, Indications for the execution - 3' 07''

MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Picture: MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Salzburg, 1756 - Vienna, 1791. Austrian composer from the Classical period. Regarded as one of the most prominent in the history of Western music. Born in Salzburg on 27 January 1756, baptized as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Studied with his father Leopold Mozart, a renowned composer and violinist who had a post at the court orchestra of the Archbishop of Salzburg. At the age of six Mozart was already a master keyboard player, an accomplished violinist, and showed extraordinary improvisation and sight-reading abilities.The five small pieces he composed at that age are still performed today. In 1762 Leopold took his son on performance tours to several courts in Europe. During that time he composed sonatas, for both hapsichord and violin (1763), a symphony (1764), an oratorio (1766) and the comic opera 'La finta semplice' (1768). In 1769 was appointed Konzertmeister at the Archbishopric of Salzburg, and at the Scala di Milano, Pope Clemens XIV created Mozart a Knight of the Golden Spur. That same year he composed 'Bastien und Bastienne', his first singspiel (an opera, usually comic and in German with spoken dialogue). The following year he was commissioned to compose his first opera, 'Mitridate, re di Ponto', which he wrote in Milan. That piece contributed to consolidate his reputation as an extraordinary musician. Mozart returned to Salzburg in 1771. His post in the city was not remunerated, but it allowed him to compose a great number of important works, that is, undermining his finances. In 1777 he was given permission to engage in a concerts tour, and he set out to Munich with his mother. At twenty-one, Mozart travelled the courts of Europe with the purpose to find a well-paid and satisfactory employment, but he didn't succeed. He went to Mannheim, the musical capital of Europe at the time, with the aim of finding a position in the orchestra, and there fell in love with Aloysia Weber. Leopold sent his wife and son to Paris. His mother's death in the French capital in 1778, together with Weber's rejection and the disdain from the aristocrats he worked for, made that two year period between his arrival in Paris and his return to Salzburg in 1779, one of the gloomiest in Mozart's life. Back in his hometown, Mozart composed two Masses and a great number of sonatas, symphonies and concertos. These works reveal, for the first time, a distinctive personal style and an exceptional musical maturity. The considerable success of his Italian opera 'Idomeneo, re di Creta', commissioned and composed in 1781, led to an invitation to visit the Archbishop of Salzburg in his palace in Vienna, but once there, Mozart felt offended at being treated like a servant and left. He then started teaching at a house that some friends rented for him. There he composed the singspiel 'Die Entführung aus dem Serail', commissioned in 1782 by Emperor Joseph II. The same year he married Constanze Weber, Alysia's younger sister; together they suffered chronic financial troubles until Mozart's death. The operas 'Le nozze di Figaro' (1786) and 'Don Giovanni' (1787), on librettos by Lorenzo Da Ponte, were not well received in Vienna in spite of having been a success in Prague. From 1787 until the creation of 'Così fan tutte' (1790, also on libretto by Da Ponte), Mozart didn't have any new commissions for operas. He composed 'La clemenza di Tito' for the coronation of emperor Leopold II in 1791, on a libretto by Metastasio. The great symphonies from 1788 No. 39 in E flat

Biography

  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for keyboard in B flat major K 570

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 2343: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Sound quality - 2' 26''
    Sound quality, Phrasing - 1' 42''
    Character, Phrasing - 1' 05''
    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 29''
    Main melody, Pedal - 1' 55''
    Clarity of execution, Sound quality - 1' 16''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for keyboard in B flat major K 570

    II. Adagio

    CLASS 2343: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Pedal, Sound quality - 1' 47''
    Character, Main melody - 2' 00''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for keyboard in B flat major K 570

    III. Allegretto

    CLASS 2343: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Main melody - 2' 08''
    Pedal, Low notes - 1' 11''
    Secondary melody, Attitude of the musician - 2' 49''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 26 in D major K 537

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 2355: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Sound quality - 2' 02''
    Character, Sound planes - 2' 00''
    Main melody, Contrast - 1' 12''
    Attitude of the musician, Voice identification - 2' 37''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 26 in D major K 537

    II. Larghetto

    CLASS 2355: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Articulation, Mutes - 2' 02''
    Attitude of the musician, Timbre - 1' 23''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Thema

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 4' 43''
    Repetition, Phrasing - 1' 27''
    Accents - 0' 58''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Variación I

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Voice identification - 1' 22''
    Part - 2' 09''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Variación II

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Indications for the execution, Sound quality - 1' 27''
    Part - 2' 31''
    The author, Attitude of the musician - 1' 12''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Variación III

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 1' 44''
    Accents, Character - 1' 08''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Variación IV

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 1' 49''
    Dynamics, Secondary melody - 1' 11''
    Phrasing, Styles and periods - 1' 03''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Variación V

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Part - 3' 00''
    Indications for the execution - 1' 26''
    Character, Tempo - 1' 31''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Variación VIII

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Evenness, Attitude of the musician - 1' 19''
    Part - 5' 15''
    Composing procedures, Evenness - 0' 58''
    Phrasing, Dynamics - 1' 20''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Variación IX

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Phrasing - 1' 46''
    Part - 7' 21''
    Sound quality, Tension - 0' 59''
    Phrasing - 1' 12''
  • MOZART | Soriano < Piano

    Variations on a Theme by Gluck in G major K 455

    Variación X

    CLASS 2494: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    The author, Articulation - 2' 48''
    Part - 4' 23''
    Pedal, Duration - 1' 07''
    Sound quality - 1' 44''

MUSORGSKY, Modest Petrovich

Picture: MUSORGSKY, Modest Petrovich

Karevo, Pskov district, 1839 - St Petersburg, 1881. Russian composer. His life was disjointed, ending in loneliness and poverty, and at the time of his death some of his most important compositions were left unfinished. His greatest achievements were as a composer of operas and solo songs. Largely self-taught and highly intellectual, he discovered a way of writing for the voice that was both lyrical and true to the inflections of speech. He was the most strikingly individual Russian composer of the later 19th century and an avatar of modernism for the generation of Debussy and Ravel.

Biography

  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    Promenade 1

    CLASS 2360: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    The work, Character - 0' 59''
    Articulation, Sound quality - 1' 30''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    2. Il vecchio castello

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Articulation, Phrasing - 2' 08''
    Pedal, Indications for the execution - 2' 04''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    2. Il vecchio castello

    CLASS 2360: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Tempo - 2' 05''
    Ending of the sound - 0' 58''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    3. Tuilleries

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Tempo, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 46''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    3. Tuilleries

    CLASS 2360: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Clarity of execution - 1' 06''
    Pedal - 1' 43''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    5. Ballet des poussins dans leurs coques

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Voice identification, Attacks - 1' 04''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    5. Ballet des poussins dans leurs coques

    CLASS 2360: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Pedal - 2' 03''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    10. La porte des Bohatyrs de Kiev

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Articulation, Sound quality - 1' 15''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    1. Gnomus

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Character - 1' 40''
    Phrasing, Tempo - 1' 18''
    Character, Attitude of the musician - 1' 02''
    Pedal, Fingerings - 1' 18''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    1. Gnomus

    CLASS 2360: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Pedal - 1' 00''
    Metrics, Indications for the execution - 1' 45''
    Tempo, Articulation - 1' 58''
    Character, Dynamics - 1' 51''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    6. Samuel Goldenberg und Schmuyle

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Pedal, Character - 2' 12''
    Pedal - 1' 50''
    Apoggiatura, Dynamics - 1' 55''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    6. Samuel Goldenberg und Schmuyle

    CLASS 2360: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 23''
    Character - 1' 08''
    Character, Dynamics - 1' 10''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    7. "Limoges". Le marché

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Voice independence, Dynamics - 2' 35''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    7. "Limoges". Le marché

    CLASS 2360: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Indications for the execution, Study methods - 4' 02''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    9. La Cabane sur des pattes de poule (Baba Yaga)

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Pedal - 1' 25''
    Sound planes, Voice identification - 1' 59''
    Pedal - 1' 21''
    Pedal, Dynamics - 1' 54''
  • MUSORGSKY | Soriano < Piano

    Pictures from an exhibition for piano

    CLASS 2182: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, The work - 1' 02''

PROKOFIEV, Sergey

Picture: PROKOFIEV, Sergey

Sontsovka, 1891 - Moscow, 1953. One of the most prolific and celebrated Russian composers of the 20th century, Sergei Prokofiev is perhaps most famous for music he composed for the children's story Peter and the Wolf. He proved his talent as a pianist and composer at a very early age, and in 1904 moved with his mother to St. Petersburg, where he studied at the St. Petersburg Conservatory. As a young man he traveled to England and Europe on tour, and in 1918 he left Russia for the United States. During the 1920s he toured New York, Chicago, London and Paris, gaining popularity with audiences, if not with critics. In 1927 he returned to perform in the Soviet Union and was greeted as a national hero. In the early 1930s he travelled between Paris and Moscow, finally settling in Moscow in 1936. A few years later, World War II marked the beginning of Prokofiev's rocky relationship with the Soviet government of Joseph Stalin. Although he continued to be a productive composer, in the late 1940s Prokofiev fell out of favor with government officials and spent his last years in failing health and financial insecurity. His works include the ballets Chout and The Love for Three Oranges, operas such as The Fiery Angel and War and Peace (based on the novel by Leo Tolstoy) and music for the Sergei Eisenstein films Alexander Nevsky (1938) and Ivan the Terrible (1942-46). Modern audiences know Prokofiev's work primarily through the many symphonic suites he composed based on his stage and film work. His birthdate is sometimes given as 11 April 1891, the date based on the Julian calendar prior to the Soviet Union adopting the Gregorian calendar. Prokofiev died on the same day as Stalin.

Biography

  • PROKOFIEV | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 4 in C minor op 29

    I. Allegro molto sostenuto

    CLASS 2349: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 1' 22''
    Sound planes, Dynamics - 1' 14''
    Sound planes, Attacks - 1' 18''
  • PROKOFIEV | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 4 in C minor op 29

    II. Andante assai

    CLASS 2349: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Sound planes - 1' 40''
    Main melody, Sound preparation - 1' 49''
    Timbre, Clarity of execution - 1' 58''
    Pedal, Character - 1' 54''
  • PROKOFIEV | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 4 in C minor op 29

    III. Allegro con brio, ma non leggiere

    CLASS 2349: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Pedal, Dynamics - 2' 58''
    Pedal, Sound quality - 1' 17''
    Phrasing, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 06''
    Accents, Sound planes - 1' 01''
  • PROKOFIEV | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 7 in B flat major op 83

    I. Allegro inquieto - Andantino

    CLASS 2351: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Attitude of the musician - 2' 23''
    Dynamics, Character - 1' 14''
    Ending of the sound, Dynamics - 2' 11''
    Study methods, Duration - 2' 53''
    Aptitude, Rigor or freedom in reading - 2' 03''
    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 29''
    Attacks, Indications for the execution - 3' 11''

RAVEL, Maurice

Picture: RAVEL, Maurice

Ciboure, Basses Pyrénées, 1875 - Paris, 1937. Maurice Ravel was among the most significant and influential composers of the early twentieth century. Although he is frequently linked with Claude Debussy as an exemplar of musical impressionism, and some of their works have a surface resemblance, Ravel possessed an independent voice that grew out of his love of a broad variety of styles, including the French Baroque, Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Spanish folk traditions, and American jazz and blues. His elegant and lyrically generous body of work was not large in comparison with that of some of his contemporaries, but his compositions are notable for being meticulously and exquisitely crafted. He was especially gifted as an orchestrator, an area in which he remains unsurpassed. Ravel's mother was of Basque heritage, a fact that accounted for his lifelong fascination with Spanish music, and his father was a Swiss inventor and engineer, most likely the source of his commitment to precision and craftsmanship. At the age of 14, he entered the Paris Conservatory, where he was a student from 1889 to 1895 and from 1897 to 1903. His primary composition teacher was Gabriel Fauré. A major disappointment of his life was his failure to win the Prix de Rome in spite of numerous attempts. The difficulty was transparently the conflict between the conservative administration of the Conservatory and Ravel's independent thinking, meaning his association with the French avant-garde (Debussy), and his interest in non-French traditions (Wagner, the Russian nationalists, Balinese gamelan). He had already established himself as a composer of prominence with works such as his String Quartet, and the piano pieces Pavane pour une infante défunte, Jeux d'eaux, and the Sonatine, and his loss of the Prix de Rome in 1905 was considered such a scandal that the director of the Conservatory was forced to resign. Ravel continued to express admiration for Debussy's music throughout his life, but as his own reputation grew stronger during the first decade of the century, a mutual professional jealousy cooled their personal relationship. Around the same time, he developed a friendship with Igor Stravinsky. The two worked collaboratively on arrangements for Sergey Diaghilev and became familiar with each other's work during Stravinsky's time in Paris. Between 1909 and 1912, Ravel composed Daphnis et Chloé for Diaghilev and Les Ballets Russes. It was the composer's largest and most ambitious work and is widely considered his masterpiece. He wrote a second ballet for Diaghilev, La Valse, which the impresario rejected, but which went on to become one of his most popular orchestral works. Following his service in the First World War as an ambulance driver, and the death of his mother in 1917, his output was temporarily diminished. In 1925, the Monte Carlo Opera presented the premiere of another large work, the 'lyric fantasy' L'enfant et les sortilèges, a collaboration with writer Colette. American jazz and blues became increasingly intriguing to the composer. In 1928 he made a hugely successful tour of North America, where he met George Gershwin and had the opportunity to broaden his exposure to jazz. Several of his most important late works, such as the Sonata for Violin and Piano and the Piano Concerto in G show the influence of that interest. Ironically, Ravel, who in his youth was rejected by some elements of the French musical establishment for being a modernist, in his later years was scorned by Satie and the

Biography

  • RAVEL | Soriano < Piano

    Jeux d'eau for piano

    CLASS 2356: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    The work, Mutes - 1' 44''
    Clarity of execution, Virtuossity - 1' 01''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Sound planes - 1' 06''
    Indications for the execution - 3' 18''
    Phrasing, Tempo - 1' 16''
    Dynamics, Pedal - 2' 04''
    Fermata, Indications for the execution - 1' 49''
    Sound quality, The author - 0' 52''

SCARLATTI, Domenico

Picture: SCARLATTI, Domenico

Naples, 1685 - Madrid, 1757

Biography

  • SCARLATTI | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for keyboard solo in C major K 159

    Allegro

    CLASS 2109: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Attacks - 1' 20''
    Left hand, Expressivity - 1' 29''
  • SCARLATTI | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for keyboard solo in E major K 380

    Andante commodo

    CLASS 2109: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Phrasing - 2' 57''
  • SCARLATTI | Soriano < Piano

    Sonata for keyboard solo in D minor K 141

    CLASS 2109: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Ending of the sound, The author - 1' 32''
    Sound quality, Styles and periods - 1' 39''
    Dynamics, Left hand - 1' 08''
    Mutes, Timbre - 1' 04''

SCHUBERT, Franz

Picture: SCHUBERT, Franz

Vienna, 1797 - Vienna, 1828. Franz Peter Schubert was among the first of the Romantics, and the composer who, more than any other, brought the art song (lied) to artistic maturity. During his short but prolific career, he produced masterpieces in nearly every genre, all characterized by rich harmonies, an expansive treatment of classical forms, and a seemingly endless gift for melody. Schubert began his earliest musical training studying with his father and brothers. Having passed an audition, Schubert enrolled at the Convict school that trained young vocalists to eventually sing at the chapel of The Imperial Court. Schubert began to explore composition and wrote a song that came to the attention of the institution's director, Antonio Salieri, who along with the school's professor of harmony, hailed young Schubert as a genius. In 1813, after Schubert's voice broke, he returned to live with his father, who directed him to follow in his footsteps and become a schoolteacher. Schubert begrudgingly complied and worked miserably in that capacity by day, while composing prolifically by night. He had written more than 100 songs as well as numerous symphonic, operatic, and chamber music scores, before he reached the age of 20. Schubert finally left his teaching position to dedicate himself completely to musical pursuits. During the summer of 1818, the young composer worked as a private music teacher to the aristocratic Esterházy family. When he left that post in the fall, Schubert lived a somewhat bohemian lifestyle, composing and spending time with a group of friends that acted as his personal support system. In 1820, Schubert was commissioned by two opera houses, the Karthnerthor Theatre and Theatre-an-der-Wein, to compose a pair of operas. He wrote Zwillingsbruden, and Zauberharfe, both of which were unenthusiastically received. Schubert failed to secure a contract with a publisher, as none were willing to take a chance on a relatively unknown composer who wrote (harmonically) untraditional music. Schubert, along with the support of his artistic friends, published his own work for a collection of roughly 100 subscribers. These efforts, however, were financially unrewarding, and Schubert struggled to sustain himself. His work garnered little attention and contemporary composers dismissed his music as presumptuous and immature. In 1823, Schubert was elected to the Musikverein of Graz, as an honorary member. Though this brought no financial reward and was an inconsequential appointment, Schubert relished its slight recognition, and to show his gratitude, composed his famous Unfinished Symphony. Five years later, Schubert's music was featured at a concert at Vienna's Musikverein. His work was received quite enthusiastically, and to much critical acclaim. This marked the only time during the composer's life that he enjoyed such success. This seemed to provide Schubert with a renewed sense of optimism, and despite illness, the composer continued to produce at an incredible rate. He began to organize a scheme to increase his artistic popularity, by continuing to evaluate his work and progress as a musician, perhaps even planning to study harmony privately. Schubert's health did not improve, and he soon found himself at death's door. During the composer's last moments, he instructed his brother Ferdinand to ensure that he would be buried alongside Ludwig van Beethoven's grave. Schubert revered the legendary composer, and was grateful to him, as Beethoven had praised his wo

Biography

  • SCHUBERT | Soriano < Piano

    3 Klavierstücke D 946

    I. Allegro assai, in E flat minor

    CLASS 2108: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Expressivity - 1' 45''
    Dynamics, Clarity of execution - 1' 05''
    Character, Rhythm - 0' 58''
    Rhythm, Pedal - 1' 10''
    Tempo, Attacks - 1' 50''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Tremolo - 1' 01''
    Tempo, Character - 1' 39''
  • SCHUBERT | Soriano < Piano

    3 Klavierstücke D 946

    III. Allegro, in C major

    CLASS 2108: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Main melody, Character - 2' 16''
    Metrics, Tempo - 1' 00''

SCHUMANN, Robert

Picture: SCHUMANN, Robert

Zwichau, 1810 - Endenich, 1856. Robert Schumann was born 8 June, 1810 in Zwickau, Germany. He was the son of a book publisher and writer. As a child, Robert Schumann showed early abilities in both music and literature, but was not considered a prodigy by any means. At sixteen, after the tragic deaths of his sister and father, he was sent to the University of Leipzig at his mother's insistence. He studied law there until he was able to convince his mother of his need to study music. In Leipzig, from 1830, he worked under the renowned piano teacher Friedrich Wieck, whose favourite daughter, Clara, was already a well-known piano prodigy. It is thought that Schumann and Clara were lovers by 1835. His own ambitions as a pianist were hampered by a weakness in the fingers of one hand (possibly caused by they syphilis that would later claim his sanity), but the 1830s nevertheless brought a number of marvellous compositions for the instrument. Robert Schumann's work is noted for its links to literature. Many of his compositions allude to characters or scenes from poems, novels, and plays; others are like musical crossword puzzles with key signatures or musical themes that refer to people or places important to him. This intimate relationship with the written word gives his music an extra dimension. At the same time, its sheer joyfulness ranks it among the best loved music of the age. Schumann was not only interested in literature, he was also a working journalist who edited his own influential musical magazine, the Neue Zeitsfchrift fur Musik. This put Schumann in a unique position: his music was often inspired by the world of words, while his work as writer and critic kept him in touch with the Romantic musical scene at large. Through his music journal he helped to bring the young Chopin and, later, the young Brahms to the attention of the German-speaking public. Schumann's courtship of and marriage to Clara Wieck is one of the most famous romances in music history. Clara's father was one of Schumann's piano teachers. He predicted a great future for his pupil, but he fiercely opposed the young man's request to marry his daughter. He not only disapproved of Schumann's drinking, he also wanted Clara to become a famous pianist in her own right. For years Friedrich did everything he could to keep Schumann and Clara apart. Schumann eventually took Wieck to court and obtained permission to marry her, but it had been a long and bitter struggle. Overall, Robert Schumann's early piano compositions, many of which were played by his wife Clara, are the most original and daring of his works. As a composer, he tended to concentrate on one type of music at a time. For instance, his songs qualify him as a worthy successor to Schubert. And while his great orchestral works remain closer to the traditional Classical forms of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, he is regarded as a talented, but not masterful. Nor was he successful as a composer of operas. It is in his piano music and his songs - Carnival ("Dainty Scenes on Four Notes") in particular - that he accomplished his greatest work. In 1850 Schumann was appointed Music Director to the city of Dusseldorf, where he enjoyed no great success. Suffering from hallucinations and rapidly declining mental facilities, he resigned in 1853. Mounting fears of insanity plunged Schumann into a serious mental break-down, and in 1854 he attempted suicide by throwing himself into the Rhine. He was then confined to an asylum at Endenich,

Biography

  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    VII. Nicht schnell

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Expressivity, Accents - 2' 00''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    IX. Lebhaft

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Dynamics - 2' 07''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    III. Mit Humor

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Pedal - 2' 01''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    I. Lebhaft

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Repetition - 1' 17''
    Dynamics, Timbre - 1' 19''
    Phrasing - 1' 11''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    IV. Ungeduldig

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Texture, Sound balance - 1' 54''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    XVII. Wie aus der Ferne

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 42''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    VI. Sehr rasch

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Indications for the execution - 1' 09''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    X. Balladenmässig. Sehr rasch

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Character - 1' 32''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    XIII. Wild und lustig

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Main melody, Indications for the execution - 1' 58''
    Phrasing, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 30''
    Articulation, Repetition - 1' 59''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Davidsbündlertänze for piano solo op 6

    XVI. Mit gutem Humor

    CLASS 2344: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Description, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 38''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Kreisleriana for piano solo op 16

    3. Sehr aufgeregt

    CLASS 2352: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Clarity of execution, Metrical rigor or freedom - 2' 08''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Kreisleriana for piano solo op 16

    4. Sehr langsam

    CLASS 2352: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Metrical rigor or freedom, Main melody - 1' 48''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 14''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Kreisleriana for piano solo op 16

    6. Sehr langsam

    CLASS 2352: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Expressivity, Phrasing - 1' 58''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Kreisleriana for piano solo op 16

    7. Sehr rasch

    CLASS 2352: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Sforzato - 1' 56''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Clarity of execution - 1' 18''
    Dynamics, Articulation - 1' 40''
  • SCHUMANN | Soriano < Piano

    Kreisleriana for piano solo op 16

    8. Schnell und spielend

    CLASS 2352: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Sound preparation - 1' 28''
    Sound planes, Dynamics - 1' 18''
    Dynamics, Pedal - 2' 21''

SKRYABIN, Alexander

Picture: SKRYABIN, Alexander

Moscow, 1872 - Moscow, 1915. Russian composer and pianist. One of the most extraordinary figures musical culture has ever witnessed, Skryabin has remained for a century a figure of cultish idolatry, reactionary yet modernist disapproval, analytical fascination and, finally, aesthetic re-evaluation and renewal. The transformation of his musical language from one that was affirmatively Romantic to one that was highly singular in its thematism and gesture and had transcended usual tonality - but was not atonal - could perhaps have occurred only in Russia where Western harmonic mores, although respected in most circles, were less fully entrenched than in Europe. While his major orchestral works have fallen out of and subsequently into vogue, his piano compositions inspired the greatest of Russian pianists to give their most noteworthy performances. Skryabin himself was an exceptionally gifted pianist, but as an adult he performed only his own works in public. The cycle of ten sonatas is arguably of the most consistent high quality since that of Beethoven and acquired growing numbers of champions throughout the 20th century.

Biography

  • SKRYABIN | Soriano < Piano

    3 Pieces for piano op 45

    1. Listok iz al'boma (Feuillet d'album)

    CLASS 2109: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Indications for the execution, The author - 1' 00''
    Phrasing, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 47''
    Dynamics, Rigor or freedom in reading - 1' 11''
    Dynamics, Sound quality - 1' 03''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 11''
    Attitude of the musician, Indications for the execution - 2' 41''
  • SKRYABIN | Soriano < Piano

    2 Poèmes for piano op 32

    1. Andante cantabile, in F sharp major

    CLASS 2109: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Attitude of the musician, Dynamics - 2' 02''
    Phrasing, Sound quality - 1' 30''
    Expressivity, Main melody - 1' 56''
  • SKRYABIN | Soriano < Piano

    2 Poèmes for piano op 32

    2. Allegro, in D major

    CLASS 2109: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Character - 2' 01''
    Dynamics, Attacks - 1' 17''

STORE SEARCH

Name


Description

Playlist

New list

In compliance with the provisions of Article 22.2 of the Spanish Information Society Services and Electronic Commerce Act (LSSI), this portal makes use of cookies. Your use of this website indicates your consent to the use of cookies described in this policy. -
You can alter the settings or find out more in cookies policy.
Cookie Policy +