VIDEO MASTER CLASSES

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Oistrakh, Igor

Picture: Oistrakh, Igor

Ukraine, 1931. The violinist Igor Oistrakh (Ukraine, 1931) has performed with the world's greatest orchestras under Klemperer, von Karajan, Giulini, Solti, Maazel, Ozawa, his father David Oistrakh, and others. For 27 years, he played in a unique duo with his father making recordings together. His wife, Natalia Zertsalova, is his duo pianist. Together they have been awarded a Honorary Membership in the Beethoven society for their recording of the complete Beethoven Sonatas and the 'Weiner Flotenuhr' by the Vienna Mozart Academy for their recording of the complete Mozart Violin Sonatas. His awards include Fellow of the Royal College of Music, 'People's Artist of USSR', Presidency of the Russian section of the European String Teachers Association, honorary member of the Ysaÿe foundation, President of the César Franck foundation and jury member of the most prestigious violin competitions. He has been Professor of the Royal Conservatory in Brussels since 1996.

Biography

BARTÓK, Béla

Picture: BARTÓK, Béla

Nagyszentmiklós, 1881 - New York, 1945. Béla Bartók was born in the Hungarian town of Nagyszentmiklós (now Sînnicolau Mare in Romania) on 25 March 1881, and received his first instruction in music from his mother, a very capable pianist; his father, the headmaster of a local school, was also musical. After his family moved to Pressburg (now Bratislava in Slovakia) in 1894, he took lessons from László Erkel, son of Ferenc Erkel, Hungary's first important operatic composer, and in 1899 he became a student at the Royal Academy of Music in Budapest, graduating in 1903. His teachers there were János Koessler, a friend of Brahms, for composition and István Thoman for piano. Bartók, who had given his first public concert at the age of eleven, now began to establish a reputation as a fine pianist that spread well beyond Hungary's borders, and he was soon drawn into teaching: in 1907 he replaced Thoman as professor of piano in the Academy. Béla Bartók's earliest compositions offer a blend of late Romanticism and nationalist elements, formed under the influences of Wagner, Brahms, Liszt and Strauss, and resulting in works such as Kossuth, an expansive symphonic poem written when he was 23. Around 1905 his friend and fellow-composer Zoltán Kodály directed his attention to Hungarian folk music and, coupled with his discovery of the music of Debussy, Bartók's musical language changed dramatically: it acquired greater focus and purpose – though initially it remained very rich, as his opera Duke Bluebeard's Castle (1911) and ballet The Wooden Prince (1917) demonstrate. But as he absorbed more and more of the spirit of Hungarian folk songs and dances, his own music grew tighter, more concentrated, chromatic and dissonant – and although a sense of key is sometimes lost in individual passages, Bartók never espoused atonality as a compositional technique. His interest is folk music was not merely passive: Bartók was an assiduous ethnomusicologist, his first systematic collecting trips in Hungary being undertaken with Kodály, and in 1906 they published a volume of the songs they had collected. Thereafter Bartók's involvement grew deeper and his scope wider, encompassing a number of ethnic traditions both near at hand and further afield: Transylvanian, Romanian, North African and others. In the 1920s and 30s Bartók's international fame spread, and he toured widely, both as pianist (usually in his own works) and as a respected composer. Works like the Dance Suite for orchestra (1923), the Cantata profana (1934) and the Divertimento for strings (1939), commissioned by Paul Sacher, maintained his high profile; indeed, he earned some notoriety when the Nazis banned his ballet The Miraculous Mandarin (1918-19) because of its sexually explicit plot. He continued to teach at the Academy of Music until his resignation in 1934, devoting much of his free time thereafter to his ethnomusicological research. With the outbreak of the Second World War, and despite his deep attachment to his homeland, life in Hungary became intolerable and Bartók and his second wife, Ditta Pásztory, emigrated to the United States. Here his material conditions worsened considerably, despite initial promise: although he obtained a post at Columbia University and was able to pursue his folk-music studies, his concert engagements become very much rarer, and he received few commissions. Koussevitzky's request for a Concerto for Orchestra (1943) was therefore particularly important, bringing him much-needed inco

Biography

  • BARTÓK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra no. 2 Sz 112 BB 117 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro non troppo

    CLASS 6767: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Melody - 2' 41''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Tempo - 2' 46''
  • BARTÓK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra no. 2 Sz 112 BB 117 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro non troppo

    CLASS 6770: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Detaché - 1' 44''
    Rhythm, Tempo - 1' 50''
    Tempo, Themes and motifs - 1' 09''
    Articulation, Bow direction - 1' 40''
    Rhythm, Duration - 1' 36''
    Vibrato, Rhythm - 1' 31''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Voice independence - 3' 41''
  • BARTÓK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra no. 2 Sz 112 BB 117 (violin and piano reduction)

    II. Andante tranquillo

    CLASS 6770: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Up-beat, Rhythm - 1' 35''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Tuning - 2' 05''
    Dynamics, Character - 1' 50''
  • BARTÓK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra no. 2 Sz 112 BB 117 (violin and piano reduction)

    III. Allegro molto

    CLASS 6770: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Metrical rigor or freedom, Rigor or freedom in reading - 2' 50''
    Rhythm - 0' 57''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 02''
    Metrics - 1' 15''
    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 3' 05''

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin and piano in A major op 47 'Kreutzer'

    I. Adagio sostenuto - Presto

    CLASS 3178: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Editions, Sound balance - 1' 38''
    Rigor or freedom in reading, Dynamics - 1' 12''
    Themes and motifs, Duration - 1' 05''
    Duration - 1' 35''
    Sound quality, Rigor or freedom in reading - 1' 11''
    Wrist, Sforzato - 3' 10''
    Glissando, Sound balance - 2' 21''
    Duration, Sforzato - 1' 53''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 1' 07''
    Accents, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 42''
    Duration, Metrical rigor or freedom - 5' 29''
    Spiccato, Bow - 1' 21''
    Articulation, Dynamics - 3' 08''
    Dynamics, Ending of the sound - 1' 26''
    Voice identification - 1' 03''
    Articulation - 1' 01''
    Vibrato, The work - 1' 02''
  • BEETHOVEN | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin and piano in A major op 47 'Kreutzer'

    II. Andante con variazioni

    CLASS 6780: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 05''
    Dynamics - 1' 23''
    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 32''
    Melody, Accents - 1' 28''
    Virtuossity, Tempo - 1' 33''
    Themes and motifs - 1' 17''
    Portamento, Character - 1' 12''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 1' 17''
    Rigor or freedom in reading, Sforzato - 1' 09''
    Bow, Character - 1' 15''
    Bow direction, Accents - 1' 57''
    Expressivity, Bow direction - 2' 01''
    Duration, Sforzato - 1' 33''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 3' 10''
    Rhythm, Articulation - 4' 43''
  • BEETHOVEN | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin and piano in A major op 47 'Kreutzer'

    III. Finale. Presto

    CLASS 6780: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Entries, Detaché - 1' 09''
    Rhythm, Dynamics - 1' 50''
    Duration, Expressivity - 2' 09''
    Articulation, Character - 1' 24''
    Sound balance, Articulation - 1' 17''
  • BEETHOVEN | Oistrakh < Violin

    Romance for violin solo and orchestra in F major op 50 (violin and piano reduction)

    CLASS 3180: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Rhythm, Tempo - 1' 05''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Sound projection - 1' 51''
    Dynamics, Voice identification - 1' 17''
    Articulation, Sound projection - 1' 11''
    Fingerings, Tuning - 1' 14''
    Vibrato, Character - 2' 14''
    Phrasing, Character - 2' 58''

BRAHMS, Johannes

Picture: BRAHMS, Johannes

Hamburg, 1833 - Vienna, 1897. Brahms was born in Hamburg. His father, who gave him his first music lessons, was a double bassist. Brahms showed early promise on the piano and helped to supplement the rather meager family income by playing the piano in restaurants and theaters, as well as by teaching. Although it is a widely-told tale that Brahms had to play the piano in bars and brothels, recent research, for example that by Kurt Hoffman, suggest that this is probably false. For a time, he also learned the violoncello, although his progress was cut short when his teacher absconded with Brahms's instrument. The young Brahms gave a few public concerts, but did not become well known as a pianist (although in later life he gave the premieres of both his Piano Concerto No. 1 in 1859 and his Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1881). He also began to compose, but his efforts did not receive much attention until he went on a concert tour with Eduard Reményi in 1853. On this tour he met Joseph Joachim, Franz Liszt, and later was introduced to the great German composer Robert Schumann. Reményi was, however, offended by Brahms' failure to praise Liszt's 'Sonata in B minor' wholeheartedly on a visit to the Court of Weimar where Liszt was the court musician. Many of Brahms' friends cited that Reményi, being the polished courtier, had expected the younger Brahms to conform to common practice of politely applauding a celebrity's piece which Brahms either failed to do or did not appear to do so with condescending compliment. He told Brahms that their friendship must end although it was not clear as to whether Liszt felt offended or otherwise. Joachim, however was to become one of his closest friends, and Schumann, through articles championing the young Brahms, played an important role in alerting the public to the young man's compositions. Brahms also became acquainted with Schumann's wife, the composer and pianist Clara, 14 years his senior, with whom he carried on a lifelong, emotionally passionate, but always platonic relationship. Brahms never married. In 1862 he settled permanently in Vienna and began to concentrate fully on composing. With work such as the German Requiem, Brahms eventually established a strong reputation and came to be regarded in his own lifetime as one of the great composers. This may have given him the confidence finally to complete his first symphony; this appeared in 1876, after about ten years of work. The other three symphonies then followed in fairly rapid succession (1877, 1883, 1885). Brahms frequently traveled, both for business (concert tours) and pleasure. He often visited Italy in the springtime, and usually sought out a pleasant rural location in which to compose during the summer. In 1890, the 57-year-old Brahms resolved to give up composing. However, as it turned out, he was unable to abide by his decision, and in the years before his death he produced a number of acknowledged masterpieces, including the two clarinet sonatas Op. 120 (1894) and the Four Serious Songs (Vier ernste Gesänge) Op. 121 (1896). While completing the Op. 121 songs Brahms fell ill of cancer (sources differ on whether this was of the liver or pancreas). His condition gradually worsened and he died on April 3, 1897. Brahms is buried in the Zentralfriedhof in Vienna.

Biography

  • BRAHMS | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin and piano no. 1 in G major op 78

    I. Vivace ma non troppo

    CLASS 3179: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Vibrato, Metrics - 2' 24''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Rhythm - 2' 17''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 2' 30''
    Duration, Expressivity - 2' 46''
    Pressure, Vibrato - 2' 25''
    Bow direction, Tempo - 2' 20''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Expressivity - 3' 31''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 1' 21''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 26''
  • BRAHMS | Oistrakh < Violin

    Scherzo for violin and piano in C minor WoO posth. (Sonata F-A-E)

    CLASS 6781: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Themes and motifs - 2' 27''
    Sound quality, Metrical rigor or freedom - 0' 58''
    Vibrato, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 06''

CHAUSSON, Ernest

Picture: CHAUSSON, Ernest

Paris, 1855 - Limay, 1899

Biography

  • CHAUSSON | Oistrakh < Violin

    Poème for solo violin and orchestra op 25 (violin and piano reduction)

    CLASS 6769: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Acoustics, Maintaining the sound - 3' 51''
    Duration, Shifts or changes of position - 1' 51''
    Dynamics - 1' 30''
    Interpenetration, Dynamics - 1' 32''
    Rhythm, Interpenetration - 2' 03''
    Dynamics, Duration - 1' 36''
    Rhythm, Metrical rigor or freedom - 3' 08''
    Dynamics, Tempo - 1' 00''
    Trill, Study methods - 0' 59''

DVORÁK, Antonin

Picture: DVORÁK, Antonin

Nelahozeves, 1841 - Prague, 1904. Dvorák was born in Nelahozeves near Prague where he spent most of his life. He studied music in Prague's Organ School at the end of the 1850s, and through the 1860s played viola in the Bohemian Provisional Theatre Orchestra which was from 1866 conducted by Bedøich Smetana. From 1892 to 1895, Dvoøák was director of the National Conservatory in New York City. The Conservatory was founded by a wealthy socialite, Jeannette Thurber, who wanted a well-known composer as director in order to lend prestige to her institution. She wrote to Dvorák, asking him to accept the position, and he agreed, providing that she were willing to meet his conditions: that talented Native American and African-American students, who could not afford the tuition, must be admitted for free. She agreed to his conditions, and he sailed to America. It was during his time as director of the Conservatory that Dvorák formed a friendship with Harry Burleigh, who became an important African-American composer. Dvorák taught Burleigh composition, and in return, Burleigh spent hours on end singing traditional American Spirituals to Dvorák. Burleigh went on to compose settings of these Spirituals which compare favorably with European classical composition. It was during his visit to the United States that he wrote his most popular work, the Symphony No.9 'From the New World'. Also while in the USA he heard a performance of a cello concerto by the composer Victor Herbert. He was so excited by the possibilities of the cello and orchestra combination displayed in this concerto that he wrote a cello concerto of his own, the Cello Concerto in B minor (1895). Since then the concerto he wrote has grown in popularity and today it is frequently performed. He also left an unfinished work, the Cello Concerto in A major (1865), which was completed and orchestrated by the German composer Günter Raphael between 1925 and 1929. Dvoøák was a colorful personality. In addition to music, there were two particular passions in his life: locomotive engines, and the breeding of pigeons. He eventually returned to Prague where he was director of the conservatoire from 1901 until his death in 1904.

Biography

  • DVORÁK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in A minor op 53 (violin and piano reduction)

    II. Adagio ma non troppo

    CLASS 3164: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Form - 3' 03''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Metrics - 2' 00''
    Maintaining the sound, Sound quality - 2' 55''
  • DVORÁK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in A minor op 53 (violin and piano reduction)

    II. Adagio ma non troppo

    CLASS 6779: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Metrical rigor or freedom, Tempo - 2' 12''
    Acoustics, Duration - 3' 43''
    Duration - 1' 01''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 00''
    Vibrato - 1' 00''
    Double stops, Scales - 2' 18''
    Ending of the sound, Interpenetration - 1' 00''
  • DVORÁK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in A minor op 53 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro ma non troppo - Quasi moderato

    CLASS 3237: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    The work, Form - 1' 10''
    Soloist, Character - 4' 40''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Expressivity - 1' 59''
    Articulation, Expressivity - 1' 10''
    Tempo, Metrical rigor or freedom - 0' 55''
    High notes, Expressivity - 1' 29''
    Dynamics, Form - 2' 41''
    Character, Expressivity - 1' 15''
    Articulation, Duration - 0' 56''
    Dynamics, Voice identification - 3' 15''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Character - 1' 03''
    Bowings, Bow direction - 0' 58''
  • DVORÁK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in A minor op 53 (violin and piano reduction)

    III. Finale. Allegro giocoso ma non troppo

    CLASS 3164: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Duration, Pressure - 1' 59''
    Character, Dynamics - 2' 03''
    Bowings, Bow direction - 1' 03''
    Dynamics, Sound balance - 0' 52''
  • DVORÁK | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in A minor op 53 (violin and piano reduction)

    III. Finale. Allegro giocoso ma non troppo

    CLASS 6779: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Tuning - 1' 42''
    Accents, Character - 1' 20''
    Expressivity, Tonality - 2' 32''
    Dynamics - 1' 06''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Interpenetration - 1' 41''
    Dynamics, Articulation - 2' 12''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Interpenetration - 1' 50''
    Fingerings, Accents - 1' 11''
    Dynamics, Bow distribution - 1' 03''

HINDEMITH, Paul

Picture: HINDEMITH, Paul

Hanau, 1895 - Franckfurt, 1963. Hindemith was taught the violin as a child, but his parents objected to his musical ambitions, and he left home at the age of eleven as a result. He entered the Hoch Conservatoire in Frankfurt am Main where he studied conducting, composition and violin under Arnold Mendelssohn and Bernhard Sekles, supporting himself by playing in dance bands and musical-comedy outfits. He led the Frankfurt Opera orchestra from 1915 to 1923 and played in the Rebner string quartet in 1921 in which he played second violin, and later the viola. In 1929 he founded the Amar Quartet, playing viola, and extensively touring Europe. In 1922, some of his pieces were heard in the International Society for Contemporary Music festival at Salzburg, which first brought him to the attention of an international audience. The following year, he began to work as an organiser of the Donaueschingen Festival, where he programmed works by several avant garde composers, including Anton Webern and Arnold Schoenberg. From 1927 he taught composition at Berlin and in the 1930s he made several visits to Ankara where he led the task of reorganising Turkish music education. Towards the end of the 1930s, he made several tours of America as a viola and viola d'amore soloist. Despite protests from the conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler, his music was condemned as 'degenerate' by the Nazis, and in 1940 he emigrated to the USA, where he taught music at Yale University and Harvard, and influenced younger American composers such as Harold Shapero. He became an American citizen in 1946, but returned to Europe in 1953, living in Zürich and teaching at the University there. Towards the end of his life he began to conduct more. He was awarded the Balzan Prize in 1962.

Biography

  • HINDEMITH | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin solo op 31 no. 2

    IV. Fünf Variationen über das Lied "Komm, lieber Mai" von Mozart

    CLASS 3164: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Articulation, Character - 2' 13''

MENDELSSOHN, Felix

Picture: MENDELSSOHN, Felix

Hamburg, 1809 - Leipzig, 1847. Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born, and generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period. The grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, he was born into a notable Jewish family, although he himself was brought up initially without religion, and later as a Lutheran Christian. He was recognized early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalise on his abilities. Indeed his father was disinclined to allow Felix to follow a musical career until it became clear that he intended seriously to dedicate himself to it. Early success in Germany was followed by travel throughout Europe; Mendelssohn was particularly well received in Britain as a composer, conductor and soloist, and his ten visits there (during which many of his major works were premiered) form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes however set him apart from many of his more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Liszt, Wagner and Berlioz. The Conservatory he founded at Leipzig became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook. Mendelssohn's work includes symphonies, concerti, oratorios, piano and chamber music. He also had an important role in the revival of interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality is now being recognized and re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the Romantic era.

Biography

  • MENDELSSOHN | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin in F major

    I. Allegro vivace

    CLASS 3239: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound balance, Attitude of the musician - 2' 24''
    Bow distribution, Syncopation - 2' 30''
    Acoustics, Sound projection - 1' 25''
    Syncopation, Dynamics - 1' 10''
    The work, Attitude of the musician - 1' 22''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin in F major

    II. Adagio

    CLASS 3239: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Sound quality - 1' 38''
    Pressure, Dynamics - 2' 44''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin in F major

    III. Assai vivace

    CLASS 3239: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Rhythm, Bow-strokes - 2' 14''

MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Picture: MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Salzburg, 1756 - Vienna, 1791. Austrian composer from the Classical period. Regarded as one of the most prominent in the history of Western music. Born in Salzburg on 27 January 1756, baptized as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Studied with his father Leopold Mozart, a renowned composer and violinist who had a post at the court orchestra of the Archbishop of Salzburg. At the age of six Mozart was already a master keyboard player, an accomplished violinist, and showed extraordinary improvisation and sight-reading abilities.The five small pieces he composed at that age are still performed today. In 1762 Leopold took his son on performance tours to several courts in Europe. During that time he composed sonatas, for both hapsichord and violin (1763), a symphony (1764), an oratorio (1766) and the comic opera 'La finta semplice' (1768). In 1769 was appointed Konzertmeister at the Archbishopric of Salzburg, and at the Scala di Milano, Pope Clemens XIV created Mozart a Knight of the Golden Spur. That same year he composed 'Bastien und Bastienne', his first singspiel (an opera, usually comic and in German with spoken dialogue). The following year he was commissioned to compose his first opera, 'Mitridate, re di Ponto', which he wrote in Milan. That piece contributed to consolidate his reputation as an extraordinary musician. Mozart returned to Salzburg in 1771. His post in the city was not remunerated, but it allowed him to compose a great number of important works, that is, undermining his finances. In 1777 he was given permission to engage in a concerts tour, and he set out to Munich with his mother. At twenty-one, Mozart travelled the courts of Europe with the purpose to find a well-paid and satisfactory employment, but he didn't succeed. He went to Mannheim, the musical capital of Europe at the time, with the aim of finding a position in the orchestra, and there fell in love with Aloysia Weber. Leopold sent his wife and son to Paris. His mother's death in the French capital in 1778, together with Weber's rejection and the disdain from the aristocrats he worked for, made that two year period between his arrival in Paris and his return to Salzburg in 1779, one of the gloomiest in Mozart's life. Back in his hometown, Mozart composed two Masses and a great number of sonatas, symphonies and concertos. These works reveal, for the first time, a distinctive personal style and an exceptional musical maturity. The considerable success of his Italian opera 'Idomeneo, re di Creta', commissioned and composed in 1781, led to an invitation to visit the Archbishop of Salzburg in his palace in Vienna, but once there, Mozart felt offended at being treated like a servant and left. He then started teaching at a house that some friends rented for him. There he composed the singspiel 'Die Entführung aus dem Serail', commissioned in 1782 by Emperor Joseph II. The same year he married Constanze Weber, Alysia's younger sister; together they suffered chronic financial troubles until Mozart's death. The operas 'Le nozze di Figaro' (1786) and 'Don Giovanni' (1787), on librettos by Lorenzo Da Ponte, were not well received in Vienna in spite of having been a success in Prague. From 1787 until the creation of 'Così fan tutte' (1790, also on libretto by Da Ponte), Mozart didn't have any new commissions for operas. He composed 'La clemenza di Tito' for the coronation of emperor Leopold II in 1791, on a libretto by Metastasio. The great symphonies from 1788 No. 39 in E flat

Biography

  • MOZART | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in D major K 218 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 3177: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Vibrato, Themes and motifs - 1' 29''
    Dynamics, Vibrato - 1' 13''
    Fingerings, Character - 1' 03''
    Trill, Vibrato - 1' 41''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Attacks - 2' 19''
    Dynamics, Character - 2' 51''
    Vibrato, Clarity of execution - 3' 16''
    Character, Clarity of execution - 1' 44''
    Sound quality, Fingerings - 1' 26''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 1' 22''
    Chords, Maintaining the sound - 1' 56''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Duration - 2' 57''

PAGANINI, Nicolò

Picture: PAGANINI, Nicolò

Genoa, 1782 - Nice, 1840

Biography

  • PAGANINI | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra no. 1 in E flat major op 6 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro maestoso

    CLASS 6781: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Duration - 2' 13''
    Bow distribution, Pressure - 1' 25''
    Dynamics, Bow - 1' 02''
    Bow distribution, Articulation - 1' 27''
    Duration, Vibrato - 1' 19''
    Tuning, Interval - 1' 38''
    Tuning, Double stops - 1' 32''
    Thirds, Shifts or changes of position - 1' 37''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Rhythm - 2' 04''
    Editions - 1' 12''
    Clarity of execution, Bow distribution - 2' 28''
    Tuning, Tenths - 2' 51''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Bow distribution - 0' 58''
    Contrast - 1' 16''

PROKOFIEV, Sergey

Picture: PROKOFIEV, Sergey

Sontsovka, 1891 - Moscow, 1953. One of the most prolific and celebrated Russian composers of the 20th century, Sergei Prokofiev is perhaps most famous for music he composed for the children's story Peter and the Wolf. He proved his talent as a pianist and composer at a very early age, and in 1904 moved with his mother to St. Petersburg, where he studied at the St. Petersburg Conservatory. As a young man he traveled to England and Europe on tour, and in 1918 he left Russia for the United States. During the 1920s he toured New York, Chicago, London and Paris, gaining popularity with audiences, if not with critics. In 1927 he returned to perform in the Soviet Union and was greeted as a national hero. In the early 1930s he travelled between Paris and Moscow, finally settling in Moscow in 1936. A few years later, World War II marked the beginning of Prokofiev's rocky relationship with the Soviet government of Joseph Stalin. Although he continued to be a productive composer, in the late 1940s Prokofiev fell out of favor with government officials and spent his last years in failing health and financial insecurity. His works include the ballets Chout and The Love for Three Oranges, operas such as The Fiery Angel and War and Peace (based on the novel by Leo Tolstoy) and music for the Sergei Eisenstein films Alexander Nevsky (1938) and Ivan the Terrible (1942-46). Modern audiences know Prokofiev's work primarily through the many symphonic suites he composed based on his stage and film work. His birthdate is sometimes given as 11 April 1891, the date based on the Julian calendar prior to the Soviet Union adopting the Gregorian calendar. Prokofiev died on the same day as Stalin.

Biography

  • PROKOFIEV | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra no. 1 in D major op 19 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Andantino

    CLASS 3238: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Character - 3' 07''
    Character, Expressivity - 2' 03''
    Pizzicato, Phrasing - 1' 21''
  • PROKOFIEV | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra no. 1 in D major op 19 (violin and piano reduction)

    II. Scherzo

    CLASS 3238: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Character - 1' 47''
  • PROKOFIEV | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra no. 1 in D major op 19 (violin and piano reduction)

    III. Moderato

    CLASS 3238: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Scales - 2' 45''

RAVEL, Maurice

Picture: RAVEL, Maurice

Ciboure, Basses Pyrénées, 1875 - Paris, 1937. Maurice Ravel was among the most significant and influential composers of the early twentieth century. Although he is frequently linked with Claude Debussy as an exemplar of musical impressionism, and some of their works have a surface resemblance, Ravel possessed an independent voice that grew out of his love of a broad variety of styles, including the French Baroque, Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Spanish folk traditions, and American jazz and blues. His elegant and lyrically generous body of work was not large in comparison with that of some of his contemporaries, but his compositions are notable for being meticulously and exquisitely crafted. He was especially gifted as an orchestrator, an area in which he remains unsurpassed. Ravel's mother was of Basque heritage, a fact that accounted for his lifelong fascination with Spanish music, and his father was a Swiss inventor and engineer, most likely the source of his commitment to precision and craftsmanship. At the age of 14, he entered the Paris Conservatory, where he was a student from 1889 to 1895 and from 1897 to 1903. His primary composition teacher was Gabriel Fauré. A major disappointment of his life was his failure to win the Prix de Rome in spite of numerous attempts. The difficulty was transparently the conflict between the conservative administration of the Conservatory and Ravel's independent thinking, meaning his association with the French avant-garde (Debussy), and his interest in non-French traditions (Wagner, the Russian nationalists, Balinese gamelan). He had already established himself as a composer of prominence with works such as his String Quartet, and the piano pieces Pavane pour une infante défunte, Jeux d'eaux, and the Sonatine, and his loss of the Prix de Rome in 1905 was considered such a scandal that the director of the Conservatory was forced to resign. Ravel continued to express admiration for Debussy's music throughout his life, but as his own reputation grew stronger during the first decade of the century, a mutual professional jealousy cooled their personal relationship. Around the same time, he developed a friendship with Igor Stravinsky. The two worked collaboratively on arrangements for Sergey Diaghilev and became familiar with each other's work during Stravinsky's time in Paris. Between 1909 and 1912, Ravel composed Daphnis et Chloé for Diaghilev and Les Ballets Russes. It was the composer's largest and most ambitious work and is widely considered his masterpiece. He wrote a second ballet for Diaghilev, La Valse, which the impresario rejected, but which went on to become one of his most popular orchestral works. Following his service in the First World War as an ambulance driver, and the death of his mother in 1917, his output was temporarily diminished. In 1925, the Monte Carlo Opera presented the premiere of another large work, the 'lyric fantasy' L'enfant et les sortilèges, a collaboration with writer Colette. American jazz and blues became increasingly intriguing to the composer. In 1928 he made a hugely successful tour of North America, where he met George Gershwin and had the opportunity to broaden his exposure to jazz. Several of his most important late works, such as the Sonata for Violin and Piano and the Piano Concerto in G show the influence of that interest. Ironically, Ravel, who in his youth was rejected by some elements of the French musical establishment for being a modernist, in his later years was scorned by Satie and the

Biography

  • RAVEL | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin and piano

    I. Allegretto

    CLASS 3175: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound balance, Voice independence - 2' 13''
  • RAVEL | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin and piano

    I. Allegretto

    CLASS 3180: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Rhythm, Staccato - 1' 17''
    Character, Duration - 1' 38''
    Rhythm, Articulation - 1' 07''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Character - 0' 59''
    Rhythm, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 41''
  • RAVEL | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin and piano

    III. Perpetuum mobile. Allegro

    CLASS 3180: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    The work, Character - 1' 29''
    Tempo, Expressivity - 4' 45''
  • RAVEL | Oistrakh < Violin

    Tzigane rapsodie de concert for violin and piano

    CLASS 3237: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Duration, Chords - 1' 22''
    Articulation, Dynamics - 1' 06''
    Expressivity - 0' 58''

SAINT-SAËNS, Camille

Picture: SAINT-SAËNS, Camille

Paris, 1835 - Algiers, 1921. Camille Saint-Saëns was something of an anomaly among French composers of the nineteenth century in that he wrote in virtually all genres, including opera, symphonies, concertos, songs, sacred and secular choral music, solo piano, and chamber music. He was generally not a pioneer, though he did help to revive some earlier and largely forgotten dance forms, like the bourée and gavotte. He was a conservative who wrote many popular scores scattered throughout the various genres: the Piano Concerto No. 2, Symphony No. 3 ("Organ"), the symphonic poem Danse macabre, the opera Samson et Dalila, and probably his most widely performed work, The Carnival of The Animals. While he remained a composer closely tied to tradition and traditional forms in his later years, he did develop a more arid style, less colorful and, in the end, less appealing. He was also a poet and playwright of some distinction. Saint-Saëns was born in Paris on October 9, 1835. He was one of the most precocious musicians ever, beginning piano lessons with his aunt at two-and-a-half and composing his first work at three. At age seven he studied composition with Pierre Maledin. When he was ten, he gave a concert that included Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto, Mozart's B flat Concerto, K. 460, along with works by Bach, Handel, and Hummel. In his academic studies, he displayed the same genius, learning languages and advanced mathematics with ease and celerity. He would also develop keen, lifelong interests in geology and astronomy. In 1848, he entered the Paris Conservatory and studied organ and composition, the latter with Halévy. By his early 20s, following the composition of two symphonies, he had won the admiration and support of Berlioz, Liszt, Gounod, Rossini, and other notable figures. From 1853 to 1876, he held church organist posts; he also taught at the École Niedermeyer (1861-65). He composed much throughout his early years, turning out the 1853 Symphony in F ("Urbs Roma"), a Mass (1855) and several concertos, including the popular second, for piano (1868). In 1875, Saint-Saëns married the nineteen-year-old Marie Truffot, bringing on perhaps the saddest chapter in his life. The union produced two children who died within six weeks of each other, one from a four-story fall. The marriage ended in 1881. Oddly, this dark period in his life produced some of his most popular works, including Danse macabre (1875) and Samson et Dalila (1878). After the tragic events of his marriage, Saint-Saëns developed a fondness for Fauré and his family, acting as a second father to his children. But he also remained very close to his mother, who had opposed his marriage. When she died in 1888, the composer fell into a deep depression, even contemplating suicide for a time. He did much travel in the years that followed and developed an interest in Algeria and Egypt, which eventually inspired him to write Africa (1891) and his Piano Concerto No. 5, the "Egyptian." He also turned out works unrelated to exotic places, such as his popular and most enduring serious composition, the Symphony No. 3. Curiously, after 1890, Saint-Saëns' music was regarded with some condescension in his homeland, while in England and the United States he was hailed as France's greatest living composer well into the twentieth century. Saint-Saëns experienced an especially triumphant concert tour when he visited the U.S. in 1915. In the last two decades of his life, he remained attached to his dogs and was

Biography

  • SAINT-SAËNS | Oistrakh < Violin

    Havanaise for solo violin and orchestra in E major op 83

    CLASS 3238: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Accents - 3' 35''
    Bow-strokes, Expressivity - 2' 07''

SIBELIUS, Jean

Picture: SIBELIUS, Jean

Hämeenlinna, 1865 - Järvenpää, 1957. Jean Sibelius was a Finnish composer of the later Romantic period whose music played an important role in the formation of the Finnish national identity. His mastery of the orchestra has been described as "prodigious". The core of Sibelius's oeuvre is his set of seven symphonies. Like Beethoven, Sibelius used each one to develop further his own personal compositional style. Unlike Beethoven who used the symphonies to make public statements, and who reserved his more intimate feelings for his smaller works, Sibelius released his personal feelings in the symphonies. These works continue to be performed frequently in the concert hall and are often recorded. In addition to the symphonies, Sibelius's best-known compositions include Finlandia, the Karelia Suite, Valse triste, the violin concerto, and The Swan of Tuonela (one of the four movements of the Lemminkäinen Suite). Other works include pieces inspired by the Finnish national epic, the Kalevala; over 100 songs for voice and piano; incidental music for 13 plays; the opera Jungfrun i tornet (The Maiden in the Tower); chamber music; piano music; Masonic ritual music; and 21 separate publications of choral music. Sibelius composed prolifically until the mid-1920s. However, after completing his Seventh Symphony (1924), the incidental music to The Tempest (1926), and the tone poem Tapiola (1926), he produced no large scale works for the remaining thirty years of his life. Although he is reputed to have stopped composing, he in fact attempted to continue writing, including abortive efforts to compose an eighth symphony. He wrote some Masonic music and re-edited some earlier works during this last period of his life, and retained an active interest in new developments in music, although he did not always view modern music favorably.

Biography

  • SIBELIUS | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in D minor op 47 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 6768: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    The author, Attitude of the musician - 5' 10''
    Accents, Attitude of the musician - 3' 15''
    Dynamics, Articulation - 1' 51''
    Character, Metrical rigor or freedom - 0' 52''
    Accents, Tempo - 1' 50''
    Rhythm, Maintaining the sound - 3' 11''
    Dynamics, Bow direction - 1' 19''
    Rhythm, Duration - 0' 56''
    Rhythm, Duration - 1' 33''
    Rhythm, Duration - 1' 44''
  • SIBELIUS | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in D minor op 47 (violin and piano reduction)

    II. Adagio di molto

    CLASS 6768: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Vibrato, Melody - 1' 36''
    Bow, Rhythm - 1' 51''
    Phrasing, Melody - 1' 34''
    Octaves, Melody - 1' 35''
    Duration, Maintaining the sound - 1' 42''
  • SIBELIUS | Oistrakh < Violin

    Concerto for violin and orchestra in D minor op 47 (violin and piano reduction)

    III. Finale. Allegro ma non tanto

    CLASS 3177: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Duration - 2' 45''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Character - 2' 15''
    Duration, Dynamics - 1' 38''
    Dynamics, Accents - 1' 00''

TCHAIKOVSKY, Pyotr Il'yich

Picture: TCHAIKOVSKY, Pyotr Il'yich

Kamsko-Votkinsk, 1840 - St Petersburg, 1893. He was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. His wide ranging output includes symphonies, operas, ballets, instrumental and chamber music and songs. He wrote some of the most popular concert and theatrical music in the classical repertoire, including the ballets Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, the 1812 Overture, his First Piano Concerto, his last three numbered symphonies, and the opera Eugene Onegin. Born into a middle-class family, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant, despite his obvious musical precocity. He pursued a musical career against the wishes of his family, entering the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1862 and graduating in 1865. This formal, Western-oriented training set him apart from the contemporary nationalistic movement embodied by the influential group of young Russian composers known as The Five, with whom Tchaikovsky's professional relationship was mixed. Although he enjoyed many popular successes, Tchaikovsky was never emotionally secure, and his life was punctuated by personal crises and periods of depression. Contributory factors were his suppressed homosexuality and fear of exposure, his disastrous marriage, and the sudden collapse of the one enduring relationship of his adult life, his 13-year association with the wealthy widow Nadezhda von Meck. Amid private turmoil Tchaikovsky's public reputation grew; he was honored by the Tsar, awarded a lifetime pension and lauded in the concert halls of the world. His sudden death at the age of 53 is generally ascribed to cholera, but some attribute it to suicide. Although perennially popular with concert audiences across the world, Tchaikovsky's music was often dismissed by critics in the early and mid-20th century as being vulgar and lacking in elevated thought. By the end of the 20th century, however, Tchaikovsky's status as a significant composer was generally regarded as secure.

Biography

  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Oistrakh < Violin

    Souvenir d'un lieu cher for violin and piano op 42

    1. Méditation in D minor

    CLASS 3239: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Contrast, Dynamics - 1' 03''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Sound projection - 2' 30''
    Expressivity, Pressure - 1' 58''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Oistrakh < Violin

    Valse-scherzo for solo violin and orchestra in C major op 34 (arrangement for violin and piano)

    CLASS 3237: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Articulation, Character - 1' 34''
    Tempo, Metrical rigor or freedom - 3' 27''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Dynamics - 1' 35''

VIEUXTEMPS, Henry

Picture: VIEUXTEMPS, Henry

Verviers, 1820 - Mustapha, Algeria, 1881

Biography

  • VIEUXTEMPS | Oistrakh < Violin

    3 Morceaux de salon for violin and piano op 32

    2. Rondino

    CLASS 6767: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    The work, The author - 0' 55''
    Dynamics, Character - 1' 19''
    Up-beat, Bow distribution - 0' 58''
    Dynamics, Sound quality - 2' 32''
    Harmonic process, Expressivity - 0' 56''
    Fingerings, Fingers - 1' 21''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Character - 3' 07''
    Portamento, Dynamics - 2' 17''
    Tempo, Character - 3' 28''
    Scales, Fingers - 2' 42''

YSAYE, Eugène-Auguste

Picture: YSAYE, Eugène-Auguste

Liège, 1858 - Brussels, 1931. The Belgian violinist Eugene-Auguste Ysaÿe was among the leading virtuosi of his day, inspiring admiration rather than jealous rivalry from other great contemporary performers. Born in Lige in 1858, he was taught by his father, Nicolas-Joseph Isaye, a violinist and opera conductor, and entered the Lige Conservatoire in 1865, studying there with D. Heynberg. At the death of his mother in 1868 and after disagreement with his teacher, he left, accompanying his father on concert tours and playing in the orchestras the latter conducted. In 1872 he returned to Lige to study with Rodolphe and Lon Massart, completing his training there with distinction in 1874. He continued his studies with Wienawski in Brussels and later, from 1876 to 1879, with Vieuxtemps in Paris. After leaving Paris, Ysaÿe took a position as leader of the Bilse orchestra in Berlin, where he continued until 1882. The period brought concert tours through Scandinavia and Russia with Anton Rubinstein, a collaboration that he found helped his own musical development. In 1883 he returned to Paris, associating there with leading composers, including Csar Franck and Camille Saint-Sans, and, from the younger generation, Ernest Chausson, Gabriel Faur, Vincent dIndy and Claude Debussy, exercising an important influence on French violin music of the time. Francks Violin Sonata was dedicated to him as a wedding present, and Ysaÿe gave the first performances in Brussels in 1886, and then in Paris. Other dedications included Chaussons Pome and Violin Concerto and Debussys String Quartet. Pire li houeu (Peter the Miner) was staged in Lige and then in Brussels. His health allowed him to attend the second of these, three weeks before his death on 12th May 1931. Ysaÿe had considerable influence on the development of violin-playing after Wienawski and Vieuxtemps, and there are many reminiscences of his playing and teaching. Yehudi Menuhin recalls a visit to Brussels to see Ysaÿe, the mentor of his own teacher, Louis Persinger, when he was, quite rightly, told to practise scales and arpeggios, advice that other great teachers have been heard to give. Joseph Szigeti recalled Ysaÿes fathers early prohibition of premature use of vibrato, finding here the reason for Ysaÿes own disciplined use of this technique, while Carl Flesch declared Ysaÿes influence the most vital and continuing. In 1937 the Eugne Ysaÿe International Competition was established, an event that later became the Queen Elisabeth of Belgium Competition. As a composer Ysaÿe lacked formal training but wrote a number of works for violin and orchestra, orchestral compositions and chamber music.

Biography

  • YSAYE | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin solo in D minor op 27 no. 3

    Ballade: Lento molto sostenuto (in modo di recitativo) - Molto moderato quasi lento - Allegro in tempo giusto e con bravura - Tempo piu vivo e ben marcato

    CLASS 3179: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 21''
    Strings, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 12''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Harmonic process - 2' 43''
    Expressivity, Vibrato - 1' 24''
    Chords, Vibrato - 1' 36''
    Shifts or changes of position , Dynamics - 1' 56''
    Bow, Dynamics - 3' 23''
    Tuning, Shifts or changes of position - 2' 03''
    Vibrato, Phrasing - 2' 22''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Detaché - 2' 15''
  • YSAYE | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin solo in G major op 27 no. 5

    I. L'Aurore. Lento assai

    CLASS 6779: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Dynamics - 1' 33''
    Tuning, Character - 1' 26''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Expressivity - 1' 01''
    Character, Tuning - 1' 44''
  • YSAYE | Oistrakh < Violin

    Sonata for violin solo in G major op 27 no. 5

    II. Danse rustique. Allegro giocoso molto moderato

    CLASS 6779: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Dynamics, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 01''
    Expressivity, Dynamics - 1' 00''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Character - 1' 48''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Expressivity - 2' 10''
  • YSAYE | Oistrakh < Violin

    Andante for violin and orchestra op posth. (arrangement for violin and piano by J. Rubenstein)

    CLASS 3175: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    The work, The author - 1' 58''
    Double stops, Dynamics - 3' 09''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 17''
    Tempo, Expressivity - 1' 25''
    Double stops, Vibrato - 0' 54''
    Expressivity, Recapitulation - 2' 20''

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