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Eguiazarova, Galina

Picture: Eguiazarova, Galina

Bakú (Azerbaijan), 1936. Galina Eguizarova was born in Bakú (Azerbaijan). She studied at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow with Alexander Goldenweiser. Since 1961 her career has been exclusively dedicated to teaching, and she has taught at that musical institution. She has collaborated as Assistant Professor with artists such as Tatiana Nicolaeva and Dimitri Bashkirov. A great many number of pianists who today are teaching and playing at the main musical institutions throughout the world, as well as winners of national and international competitions, have been her pupils. Among her most celebrated students are Maria Stembolskaya, Radu Lupu and Arcadi Volodos, who studied under her tutorship for several years. Galina Eguiazarova has been honoured by the Russian Ministry of Culture for her teaching activities. Since the 1993-1994 academic year Galina Eguiazarova has been Assistant Professor of Dimitri Bashkirov, Head Professor of the Piano Chair at the Reina Sofía School of Music, sponsored by the Banco Santander Foundation, and since the 2000-2001 academic year she heads her own piano teaching activities at that School.

Biography

BACH, Johann Sebastian

Picture: BACH, Johann Sebastian

Eisenach, 1685 - Leipzig, 1750. Born into a musical family, Bach received his earliest instruction from his father. After his father's death in 1695, Bach moved to Ohrdruf, where he lived and studied organ with his older brother Johann Christoph. He also received an education at schools in Eisenach, Ohrdruf, and Lüneburg. Bach's first permanent positions were as organist in Arnstadt (1703-1707) and Mühlhausen (1707-1708). During these years, he performed, composed taught, and developed an interest in organ building. From 1708-1717 he was employed by Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar, first as court organist, and after 1714, as concertmaster. During this period, he composed many of his best organ compositions; in his capacity as concertmaster, he was also expected to produce a cantata each month. In Weimar, Bach's style was influenced by his study of numerous Italian compositions (especially Vivaldi concertos). Bach's next position, as Music Director for the Prince Leopold of Cüthen (1717-1723), involved entirely different activities. Since the court chapel was Calvinist, there was no need for church compositions; Bach probably used the Cüthen organs only for teaching and practice. His new works were primarily for instrumental solo or ensemble, to be used as court entertainment or for instruction. Among the important compositions at Cüthen were the Brandenburg Concertos, the first volume of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (The Well-Tempered Clavier), the "French" and "English" Suites for harpsichord (although the "English" Suites may be from the Weimar period), and most of the sonatas and suites for other instruments. In 1723, Bach was appointed cantor at the St. Thomas Church and School, and Director of Music for Leipzig, positions which he retained for the rest of his career. His official duties included the responsibility of overseeing the music in the four principal churches of the city, and organizing other musical events sponsored by the municipal council. During his first six years in Leipzig (1723-1729), Bach's most impressive compositions were his sacred cantatas (four yearly cycles), and the St. John and St. Matthew Passions. Bach apparently gave virtuoso organ recitals in Leipzig and on various tours, although he had no official position as organist in Leipzig. In 1729-1737 and 1739-1741, he was director of the Leipzig Collegium Musicum, an organization which had been founded by Telemann in 1704. This group of professional musicians and university students performed weekly concerts (out-of-doors in the summer, and at Zimmerman's coffee-house in the winter). Although no specific programs for these concerts have survived, Bach apparently revived and many of his instrumental compositions from Cüthen, wrote new works (e.g., secular cantatas), and conducted pieces by other composers. During the 1730s, Bach renewed his interest in keyboard compositions, and prepared the first three volumes of his Clavier-Übung (Keyboard Practice) for publication (1731, 1735, 1739); the fourth volume appeared in 1741-1742. In the 1730s, he also showed considerable interest in the royal court at Dresden, and was named "Hofkomponist" (court-composer") in Dresden in 1736. During Bach's last decade (the 1740s), he completed or revised several large-scale projects which he had started earlier. The Well-Tempered Clavier, Vol. II; a manuscript collection of chorale preludes (known as the "Leipzig 18", comprising revisions of Weimar pieces), and the B minor Mass. Other new works showed

Biography

  • BACH | Eguiazarova < Piano

    Partita for keyboard no. 6 in E minor BWV 830

    I. Toccata

    CLASS 6826: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 52''
    Harmonic process, Rhythm - 1' 18''
    Metrical rigor or freedom, Rhythm - 1' 22''
    Dynamics, Voice independence - 1' 22''
    Attitude of the musician, Character - 1' 24''
    Chords, Tension - 1' 59''
    Attitude of the musician, Character - 1' 10''
    Right hand, Dynamics - 1' 05''
    Character, Rhythm - 2' 55''
    Sound quality, Rhythm - 1' 50''
    Attitude of the musician, Rhythm - 2' 15''
  • BACH | Eguiazarova < Piano

    Partita for keyboard no. 6 in E minor BWV 830

    II. Allemanda

    CLASS 6826: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Character - 3' 39''
  • BACH | Eguiazarova < Piano

    Partita for keyboard no. 6 in E minor BWV 830

    III. Corrente

    CLASS 6826: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Metrics - 3' 38''
    Harmony, Clarity of execution - 3' 04''
    Articulation, Virtuossity - 1' 31''
    Harmony, Rhythm - 1' 06''
  • BACH | Eguiazarova < Piano

    Partita for keyboard no. 6 in E minor BWV 830

    IV. Air

    CLASS 6826: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Rhythm - 1' 03''
    Scales - 2' 12''
    Sound planes, Rhythm - 2' 02''
  • BACH | Eguiazarova < Piano

    Partita for keyboard no. 6 in E minor BWV 830

    V. Sarabande

    CLASS 6826: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Tempo, Character - 3' 06''
    Indications for the execution, Description - 2' 32''
    Dynamics, Expressivity - 1' 40''
  • BACH | Eguiazarova < Piano

    Partita for keyboard no. 6 in E minor BWV 830

    VII. Gigue

    CLASS 6826: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Character, Rhythm - 2' 51''
    Sound planes - 0' 59''
    Articulation - 2' 04''
    Polyphony - 1' 44''
    Silence, Expressivity - 2' 40''
    Polyphony - 2' 46''
    Voice identification, Articulation - 1' 32''
    Tension, Character - 1' 40''

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Eguiazarova < Piano

    6 Bagatelles for piano op 126

    1. Andante con moto

    CLASS 6808: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Fingers - 1' 27''
    Sound quality, Phrasing - 4' 30''
    Trill, Melody - 1' 59''
    Body gestures, Tension - 1' 42''
    Melody - 1' 46''
    Expressivity, Trill - 1' 59''
    Sound quality, Attacks - 2' 18''
    Pedal - 1' 19''
    Articulation, Pedal - 1' 09''
    Tension - 1' 27''
    Phrasing, Body gestures - 4' 26''
    Attacks - 2' 20''
  • BEETHOVEN | Eguiazarova < Piano

    6 Bagatelles for piano op 126

    2. Allegro

    CLASS 6808: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Sound quality, Fingers - 2' 49''
    Body gestures - 0' 58''
    Clarity of execution - 1' 46''
    Sound quality, Melody - 1' 48''
    Pianistic articulation, Octaves - 2' 35''
    Rigor or freedom in reading, Attitude of the musician - 1' 11''
  • BEETHOVEN | Eguiazarova < Piano

    6 Bagatelles for piano op 126

    3. Andante

    CLASS 6808: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Relaxation, Expressivity - 3' 13''
    Attitude of the musician - 1' 57''
    Pedal, Sound quality - 1' 10''
    Study methods, Attitude of the musician - 2' 40''
    Pianistic articulation, Pedal - 0' 59''
    Pedal, Study methods - 1' 03''
    Cadence, Body gestures - 1' 53''
    Body gestures - 1' 57''

LISZT, Franz

Picture: LISZT, Franz

Raiding (Doborján), 1811 - Bayreuth, 1886. Hungarian composer, pianist and teacher. He was one of the leaders of the Romantic movement in music. In his compositions he developed new methods, both imaginative and technical, which left their mark upon his forward-looking contemporaries and anticipated some 20th-century ideas and procedures; he also evolved the method of 'transformation of themes' as part of his revolution in form, made radical experiments in harmony and invented the symphonic poem for orchestra. As the greatest piano virtuoso of his time, he used his sensational technique and captivating concert personality not only for personal effect but to spread, through his transcriptions, knowledge of other composers' music. As a conductor and teacher, especially at Weimar, he made himself the most influential figure of the New German School dedicated to progress in music. His unremitting championship of Wagner and Berlioz helped these composers achieve a wider European fame. Equally important was his unrivalled commitment to preserving and promoting the best of the past, including Bach, Handel, Schubert, Weber and above all Beethoven; his performances of such works as Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and Hammerklavier Sonata created new audiences for music hitherto regarded as incomprehensible. The seeming contradictions in his personal life a strong religious impulse mingled with a love of worldly sensation were resolved by him with difficulty. Yet the vast amount of new biographical information makes the unthinking view of him as 'half gypsy, half priest' impossible to sustain. He contained in his character more of the ideals and aspirations of the 19th century than any other major musician.

Biography

  • LISZT | Eguiazarova < Piano

    Consolations for piano S 172

    5. Andantino

    CLASS 6819: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Introduction, Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 40''
    Harmony, Character - 3' 36''
    Character - 2' 17''
    Character, Harmonic process - 3' 14''
    Character, Tonality - 1' 28''
    Melody, Dynamics - 1' 41''
    Harmony, Character - 1' 35''
    Accompaniment, Character - 2' 23''
  • LISZT | Eguiazarova < Piano

    Années de pèlerinage, troisième année for piano solo S 163

    4. Les jeux deau à la Villa dEste

    CLASS 6819: [O.V.: Russian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Study methods, Left hand - 1' 47''
    Rhythm, Articulation - 1' 43''
    Dynamics, Articulation - 1' 38''
    Melody, Pedal - 1' 31''
    Metrical rigor or freedom - 1' 07''
    Harmony - 1' 53''
    Indications for the execution - 3' 28''
    Character, Articulation - 2' 00''
    Metrics, Accents - 2' 36''
    Tempo, Metrics - 3' 15''

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