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  • COMPOSER
  • CLASS

Rados, Ferenc

Picture: Rados, Ferenc

Budapest. null

Biography

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Rados < Piano

    Sonata for piano no. 21 in C major op 53 'Waldstein'

    I. Allegro con brio

    CLASS 4383: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 1' 55''
    Part - 12' 03''
    Part - 2' 03''
    Part - 2' 06''
    Part - 4' 13''
    Part - 2' 49''
    Part - 21' 16''
    Part - 3' 44''
  • BEETHOVEN | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano trio in E flat major op 70 no. 2

    I. Poco sostenuto - Allegro ma non troppo

    CLASS 4390: [O.V.: English-Spanish]

    Content

    Part - 9' 27''
    Part - 1h 06' 28''
  • BEETHOVEN | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano trio in G major op 1 no. 2

    II. Largo con espressione

    CLASS 4332: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 43' 13''
    Part - 10' 33''
  • BEETHOVEN | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano trio in B flat major op 97 'Archduke'

    III. Andante cantabile ma però con moto

    CLASS 4364: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 1h 21' 54''

DVORÁK, Antonin

Picture: DVORÁK, Antonin

Nelahozeves, 1841 - Prague, 1904. Dvorák was born in Nelahozeves near Prague where he spent most of his life. He studied music in Prague's Organ School at the end of the 1850s, and through the 1860s played viola in the Bohemian Provisional Theatre Orchestra which was from 1866 conducted by Bedøich Smetana. From 1892 to 1895, Dvoøák was director of the National Conservatory in New York City. The Conservatory was founded by a wealthy socialite, Jeannette Thurber, who wanted a well-known composer as director in order to lend prestige to her institution. She wrote to Dvorák, asking him to accept the position, and he agreed, providing that she were willing to meet his conditions: that talented Native American and African-American students, who could not afford the tuition, must be admitted for free. She agreed to his conditions, and he sailed to America. It was during his time as director of the Conservatory that Dvorák formed a friendship with Harry Burleigh, who became an important African-American composer. Dvorák taught Burleigh composition, and in return, Burleigh spent hours on end singing traditional American Spirituals to Dvorák. Burleigh went on to compose settings of these Spirituals which compare favorably with European classical composition. It was during his visit to the United States that he wrote his most popular work, the Symphony No.9 'From the New World'. Also while in the USA he heard a performance of a cello concerto by the composer Victor Herbert. He was so excited by the possibilities of the cello and orchestra combination displayed in this concerto that he wrote a cello concerto of his own, the Cello Concerto in B minor (1895). Since then the concerto he wrote has grown in popularity and today it is frequently performed. He also left an unfinished work, the Cello Concerto in A major (1865), which was completed and orchestrated by the German composer Günter Raphael between 1925 and 1929. Dvoøák was a colorful personality. In addition to music, there were two particular passions in his life: locomotive engines, and the breeding of pigeons. He eventually returned to Prague where he was director of the conservatoire from 1901 until his death in 1904.

Biography

  • DVORÁK | Rados < Chamber music

    Dumky for piano, violin and cello op 90

    Dumka 4. Andante moderato

    CLASS 4337: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 5' 33''
    Part - 10' 06''
  • DVORÁK | Rados < Chamber music

    Dumky for piano, violin and cello op 90

    Dumka 6. Lento maestoso - Vivace

    CLASS 4380: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 4' 39''
    Part - 7' 00''
  • DVORÁK | Rados < Chamber music

    Dumky for piano, violin and cello op 90

    Dumka 1. Lento maestoso - Allegro molto

    CLASS 4313: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 4' 17''
    Part - 33' 14''
  • DVORÁK | Rados < Chamber music

    Dumky for piano, violin and cello op 90

    Dumka 2. Poco Adagio - Vivace non troppo

    CLASS 4313: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 21' 39''
  • DVORÁK | Rados < Chamber music

    Dumky for piano, violin and cello op 90

    Dumka 3. Andante - Vivace non troppo

    CLASS 4337: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 6' 01''
    Part - 39' 45''
  • DVORÁK | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano quartet in E flat major op 87

    II. Lento

    CLASS 4371: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 24' 56''
    Part - 3' 13''
    Part - 32' 52''

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

HAYDN, Franz Joseph

Picture: HAYDN, Franz Joseph

Rohrau, 1732 - Vienna, 1809. Austrian composer, brother of Michael Haydn. Neither he nor his contemporaries used the name Franz, and there is no reason to do so today. He began his career in the traditional patronage system of the late Austrian Baroque, and ended as a 'free' artist within the burgeoning Romanticism of the early 19th century. Famous as early as the mid-1760s, by the 1780s he had become the most celebrated composer of his time, and from the 1790s until his death was a culture-hero throughout Europe. Since the early 19th century he has been venerated as the first of the three 'Viennese Classics' (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven). He excelled in every musical genre; during the first half of his career his vocal works were as famous as his instrumental ones, although after his death the reception of his music focussed on the latter (except for The Creation). He is familiarly known as the 'father of the symphony' and could with greater justice be thus regarded for the string quartet; no other composer approaches his combination of productivity, quality and historical importance in these genres. In the 20th century he was understood primarily as an 'absolute' musician (exhibiting wit, originality of form, motivic saturation and a 'modernist' tendency to problematize music rather than merely to compose it), but earnestness, depth of feeling and referential tendencies are equally important to his art

Biography

  • HAYDN | Rados < Chamber music

    Sonata for harpsichord, violin and cello no. 1 in G major H XV: 5

    I. Adagio non tanto

    CLASS 4300: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 3' 21''
    Part - 41' 47''

MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Picture: MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Salzburg, 1756 - Vienna, 1791. Austrian composer from the Classical period. Regarded as one of the most prominent in the history of Western music. Born in Salzburg on 27 January 1756, baptized as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Studied with his father Leopold Mozart, a renowned composer and violinist who had a post at the court orchestra of the Archbishop of Salzburg. At the age of six Mozart was already a master keyboard player, an accomplished violinist, and showed extraordinary improvisation and sight-reading abilities.The five small pieces he composed at that age are still performed today. In 1762 Leopold took his son on performance tours to several courts in Europe. During that time he composed sonatas, for both hapsichord and violin (1763), a symphony (1764), an oratorio (1766) and the comic opera 'La finta semplice' (1768). In 1769 was appointed Konzertmeister at the Archbishopric of Salzburg, and at the Scala di Milano, Pope Clemens XIV created Mozart a Knight of the Golden Spur. That same year he composed 'Bastien und Bastienne', his first singspiel (an opera, usually comic and in German with spoken dialogue). The following year he was commissioned to compose his first opera, 'Mitridate, re di Ponto', which he wrote in Milan. That piece contributed to consolidate his reputation as an extraordinary musician. Mozart returned to Salzburg in 1771. His post in the city was not remunerated, but it allowed him to compose a great number of important works, that is, undermining his finances. In 1777 he was given permission to engage in a concerts tour, and he set out to Munich with his mother. At twenty-one, Mozart travelled the courts of Europe with the purpose to find a well-paid and satisfactory employment, but he didn't succeed. He went to Mannheim, the musical capital of Europe at the time, with the aim of finding a position in the orchestra, and there fell in love with Aloysia Weber. Leopold sent his wife and son to Paris. His mother's death in the French capital in 1778, together with Weber's rejection and the disdain from the aristocrats he worked for, made that two year period between his arrival in Paris and his return to Salzburg in 1779, one of the gloomiest in Mozart's life. Back in his hometown, Mozart composed two Masses and a great number of sonatas, symphonies and concertos. These works reveal, for the first time, a distinctive personal style and an exceptional musical maturity. The considerable success of his Italian opera 'Idomeneo, re di Creta', commissioned and composed in 1781, led to an invitation to visit the Archbishop of Salzburg in his palace in Vienna, but once there, Mozart felt offended at being treated like a servant and left. He then started teaching at a house that some friends rented for him. There he composed the singspiel 'Die Entführung aus dem Serail', commissioned in 1782 by Emperor Joseph II. The same year he married Constanze Weber, Alysia's younger sister; together they suffered chronic financial troubles until Mozart's death. The operas 'Le nozze di Figaro' (1786) and 'Don Giovanni' (1787), on librettos by Lorenzo Da Ponte, were not well received in Vienna in spite of having been a success in Prague. From 1787 until the creation of 'Così fan tutte' (1790, also on libretto by Da Ponte), Mozart didn't have any new commissions for operas. He composed 'La clemenza di Tito' for the coronation of emperor Leopold II in 1791, on a libretto by Metastasio. The great symphonies from 1788 No. 39 in E flat

Biography

  • MOZART | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for piano, violin and cello in B flat major K 502

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4348: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 24' 28''
    Part - 26' 13''

SCHOENBERG, Arnold

Picture: SCHOENBERG, Arnold

Vienna, 1874 - Los Angeles, 1951

Biography

  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    I. Langsam - Sehr rasch

    CLASS 4317: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 6' 13''
    Part - 8' 26''
  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    I. Langsam - Sehr rasch

    CLASS 4345: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 6' 59''
    Part - 22' 32''
  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    II. Sehr rasch

    CLASS 4317: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 1' 34''
  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    II. Sehr rasch

    CLASS 4345: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 8' 11''
    Part - 4' 46''
  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    III. Viel langsamer, aber doch fliessend

    CLASS 4317: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 3' 05''
    Part - 32' 24''
  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    III. Viel langsamer, aber doch fliessend

    CLASS 4345: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 12' 05''
    Part - 5' 27''
  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    IV. Viel langsamer

    CLASS 4317: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 4' 05''
  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    IV. Viel langsamer

    CLASS 4345: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 9' 32''
  • SCHOENBERG | Rados < Chamber music

    Kammersymphonie for 15 instruments no. 1 op 9 (arrangement for flute or violin, clarinet or viola, piano, violin and cello by A. Webern)

    V. Schwundvoll

    CLASS 4317: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 6' 57''

SCHUBERT, Franz

Picture: SCHUBERT, Franz

Vienna, 1797 - Vienna, 1828. Franz Peter Schubert was among the first of the Romantics, and the composer who, more than any other, brought the art song (lied) to artistic maturity. During his short but prolific career, he produced masterpieces in nearly every genre, all characterized by rich harmonies, an expansive treatment of classical forms, and a seemingly endless gift for melody. Schubert began his earliest musical training studying with his father and brothers. Having passed an audition, Schubert enrolled at the Convict school that trained young vocalists to eventually sing at the chapel of The Imperial Court. Schubert began to explore composition and wrote a song that came to the attention of the institution's director, Antonio Salieri, who along with the school's professor of harmony, hailed young Schubert as a genius. In 1813, after Schubert's voice broke, he returned to live with his father, who directed him to follow in his footsteps and become a schoolteacher. Schubert begrudgingly complied and worked miserably in that capacity by day, while composing prolifically by night. He had written more than 100 songs as well as numerous symphonic, operatic, and chamber music scores, before he reached the age of 20. Schubert finally left his teaching position to dedicate himself completely to musical pursuits. During the summer of 1818, the young composer worked as a private music teacher to the aristocratic Esterházy family. When he left that post in the fall, Schubert lived a somewhat bohemian lifestyle, composing and spending time with a group of friends that acted as his personal support system. In 1820, Schubert was commissioned by two opera houses, the Karthnerthor Theatre and Theatre-an-der-Wein, to compose a pair of operas. He wrote Zwillingsbruden, and Zauberharfe, both of which were unenthusiastically received. Schubert failed to secure a contract with a publisher, as none were willing to take a chance on a relatively unknown composer who wrote (harmonically) untraditional music. Schubert, along with the support of his artistic friends, published his own work for a collection of roughly 100 subscribers. These efforts, however, were financially unrewarding, and Schubert struggled to sustain himself. His work garnered little attention and contemporary composers dismissed his music as presumptuous and immature. In 1823, Schubert was elected to the Musikverein of Graz, as an honorary member. Though this brought no financial reward and was an inconsequential appointment, Schubert relished its slight recognition, and to show his gratitude, composed his famous Unfinished Symphony. Five years later, Schubert's music was featured at a concert at Vienna's Musikverein. His work was received quite enthusiastically, and to much critical acclaim. This marked the only time during the composer's life that he enjoyed such success. This seemed to provide Schubert with a renewed sense of optimism, and despite illness, the composer continued to produce at an incredible rate. He began to organize a scheme to increase his artistic popularity, by continuing to evaluate his work and progress as a musician, perhaps even planning to study harmony privately. Schubert's health did not improve, and he soon found himself at death's door. During the composer's last moments, he instructed his brother Ferdinand to ensure that he would be buried alongside Ludwig van Beethoven's grave. Schubert revered the legendary composer, and was grateful to him, as Beethoven had praised his wo

Biography

  • SCHUBERT | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano quintet in A major D 667 'Die Forelle'

    I. Allegro vivace

    CLASS 4310: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 1' 06''
    Part - 18' 08''
    Part - 28' 28''
    Part - 10' 35''
  • SCHUBERT | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano quintet in A major D 667 'Die Forelle'

    IV. Tema con variazioni. Andantino - Allegretto

    CLASS 4359: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 22' 44''
    Part - 15' 10''
  • SCHUBERT | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano quintet in A major D 667 'Die Forelle'

    IV. Tema con variazioni. Andantino - Allegretto

    CLASS 4360: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 10' 41''

SCHUMANN, Robert

Picture: SCHUMANN, Robert

Zwichau, 1810 - Endenich, 1856. Robert Schumann was born 8 June, 1810 in Zwickau, Germany. He was the son of a book publisher and writer. As a child, Robert Schumann showed early abilities in both music and literature, but was not considered a prodigy by any means. At sixteen, after the tragic deaths of his sister and father, he was sent to the University of Leipzig at his mother's insistence. He studied law there until he was able to convince his mother of his need to study music. In Leipzig, from 1830, he worked under the renowned piano teacher Friedrich Wieck, whose favourite daughter, Clara, was already a well-known piano prodigy. It is thought that Schumann and Clara were lovers by 1835. His own ambitions as a pianist were hampered by a weakness in the fingers of one hand (possibly caused by they syphilis that would later claim his sanity), but the 1830s nevertheless brought a number of marvellous compositions for the instrument. Robert Schumann's work is noted for its links to literature. Many of his compositions allude to characters or scenes from poems, novels, and plays; others are like musical crossword puzzles with key signatures or musical themes that refer to people or places important to him. This intimate relationship with the written word gives his music an extra dimension. At the same time, its sheer joyfulness ranks it among the best loved music of the age. Schumann was not only interested in literature, he was also a working journalist who edited his own influential musical magazine, the Neue Zeitsfchrift fur Musik. This put Schumann in a unique position: his music was often inspired by the world of words, while his work as writer and critic kept him in touch with the Romantic musical scene at large. Through his music journal he helped to bring the young Chopin and, later, the young Brahms to the attention of the German-speaking public. Schumann's courtship of and marriage to Clara Wieck is one of the most famous romances in music history. Clara's father was one of Schumann's piano teachers. He predicted a great future for his pupil, but he fiercely opposed the young man's request to marry his daughter. He not only disapproved of Schumann's drinking, he also wanted Clara to become a famous pianist in her own right. For years Friedrich did everything he could to keep Schumann and Clara apart. Schumann eventually took Wieck to court and obtained permission to marry her, but it had been a long and bitter struggle. Overall, Robert Schumann's early piano compositions, many of which were played by his wife Clara, are the most original and daring of his works. As a composer, he tended to concentrate on one type of music at a time. For instance, his songs qualify him as a worthy successor to Schubert. And while his great orchestral works remain closer to the traditional Classical forms of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, he is regarded as a talented, but not masterful. Nor was he successful as a composer of operas. It is in his piano music and his songs - Carnival ("Dainty Scenes on Four Notes") in particular - that he accomplished his greatest work. In 1850 Schumann was appointed Music Director to the city of Dusseldorf, where he enjoyed no great success. Suffering from hallucinations and rapidly declining mental facilities, he resigned in 1853. Mounting fears of insanity plunged Schumann into a serious mental break-down, and in 1854 he attempted suicide by throwing himself into the Rhine. He was then confined to an asylum at Endenich,

Biography

  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano quintet in E flat major op 44

    II. In modo d'una marcia. Un poco largamente

    CLASS 4386: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 33' 00''
    Part - 10' 43''
    Part - 1' 33''
  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Chamber music

    Piano quartet in E flat major op 47

    I. Sostenuto assai - Allegro ma non troppo

    CLASS 4297: [O.V.: English-Spanish]

    Content

    Part - 56' 00''
  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for violin, cello and piano no. 1 in D minor op 63

    I. Mit Energie und Leidenschaft

    CLASS 4350: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 12' 15''
    Part - 55' 14''
    Part - 10' 35''
  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for violin, cello and piano no. 1 in D minor op 63

    I. Mit Energie und Leidenschaft

    CLASS 4376: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 35' 31''
    Part - 3' 52''
  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for violin, cello and piano no. 1 in D minor op 63

    II. Lebhaft, doch nicht zu rasch

    CLASS 4350: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 17' 49''
  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for violin, cello and piano no. 1 in D minor op 63

    III. Langsam, mit inniger Empfindung

    CLASS 4350: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 33' 43''
  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for violin, cello and piano no. 1 in D minor op 63

    III. Langsam, mit inniger Empfindung

    CLASS 4377: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 30' 14''
  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for violin, cello and piano no. 1 in D minor op 63

    IV. Mit Feuer

    CLASS 4377: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 12' 58''
    Part - 20' 17''
  • SCHUMANN | Rados < Piano

    Concert sans orchestre for piano solo in F minor op 14

    I. Allegro brillante

    CLASS 4395: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 45' 03''
    Part - 13' 55''
    Part - 3' 58''

TURINA, Joaquín

Picture: TURINA, Joaquín

Sevilla, 1882 - Madrid, 1949. Joaquín Turina Pérez was born in Sevilla on the 9th of December 1882. Born into a comfortable middle class family, he was surrounded by an artistic environment that was a good influence on the future musician. At the age of four he was given as a gift an accordion and surprised everyone with the speed and facility he learned to play. In 1894 he began his formal studies of harmony theory and counterpoint. Almost immediately he began to compose small pieces. His debut was on March 14 1897 where he performed the Thalberg's Fantasy on a theme from Rossini's Moses that set him on the road to become a full fledged performer. In 1902 he moved to Madrid where he quickly became involved in the musical scene there and saw the premier of his Zarzuela La sulamita. In 1905 he, as most other Spanish composers of the time, went to Paris. He studied piano with Moszkowsky and theory under Vicent d'Indy in the Schola Cantorum. He became good friends with Albeniz and Falla, and it was Albeniz who encouraged to find inspiration in the popular music of Spain and Andalucía. His quintet that was premiered in Paris was given the Op. 1 as the beginning of a new way of looking at music and he rarely looked back on the many works published before this time. In 1914 he returned to Madrid, where his life was divided between composing, teaching and performing. Turina died in Madrid on the 14th of January 1949.

Biography

  • TURINA | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for piano, violin and cello in B minor op 76

    I. Lento - Allegro molto moderato

    CLASS 4414: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 2' 37''
    Part - 31' 53''
  • TURINA | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for piano, violin and cello in B minor op 76

    II. Molto Vivace

    CLASS 4414: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 2' 15''
    Part - 5' 20''
  • TURINA | Rados < Chamber music

    Trio for piano, violin and cello in B minor op 76

    III. Lento - Andante mosso - Allegretto

    CLASS 4414: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 4' 48''
    Part - 16' 23''

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