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Rizzi, Marco

Picture: Rizzi, Marco

Milan (Italy), 1967. "He is a top class violinist with an extensive pallete of sound, beautiful technique and fascinating legato cantabile; a surprisingly honest and mature musician..." (STRAD). Starting with the 2007-2008 academic year, Marco Rizzi is Head of the Violin Chair of the Reina Sofía School of Music. Prizewinner in three of the most prestigious violin competitions: Moscow Tchaikovsky, Brussels Queen Elizabeth and the Indianapolis Violin Competition, Marco Rizzi is highly respected for the quality, forcefulness and deepness of his performances. Pupil of G. Magnani, S. Accardo and W.Lieberman, obtained in 1991 the Europäischen Musikförderpreis with the endorsement of Claudio Abbado. He is regularly invited to the most prestigious halls such as the Scala in Milan, Gaveau and Pleyel Halls in Paris, Lincoln Center in New York, Grand Hall at Moscow's Conservatory, Musikhalle in Hamburg, Tivoli in Copenhagen, Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Konzerthaus in Berlin. He has performed with conductors such as R.Chailly, H. Vonk, A. Ceccato, V. Jurowski, P. Eötvös and orchestras such as Dresden Staatskapelle, Indianapolis Symphony, Liverpool Philharmonic, Concerts Lamoreux, Hong Kong Philharmonic, Rotterdam Philharmonic, Madrid RTVE Symphony, Scottish BBC, Nederland's Philharmonic, and many others. Marco Rizzi each year enriches his repertory with a new. He has a vivid interest for less-known repertory pieces: B. Walter's Sonata, J. Adams Concerto, or Italian 19th Century, greatly acclaimed by the music world music together with his recordings of J. S. Bach sonatas and partitas. He has a special passion for chamber music and pedagogy. He has been Head Professor at Detmold and gives Master Classes at Enghien and Biella. Since 2008-2009 he is Head Professor at Mannheim. Marco Rizzi plays a 1742 Pietro Guarneri violin on loan from the Pro Canale Onlus Foundation. Since the 2007-2008 academic year, Rizzi is Head Professor of the Violin Chair of the Reina Sofía School of Music.

Biography

RAVEL, Maurice

Picture: RAVEL, Maurice

Ciboure, Basses Pyrénées, 1875 - Paris, 1937. Maurice Ravel was among the most significant and influential composers of the early twentieth century. Although he is frequently linked with Claude Debussy as an exemplar of musical impressionism, and some of their works have a surface resemblance, Ravel possessed an independent voice that grew out of his love of a broad variety of styles, including the French Baroque, Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Spanish folk traditions, and American jazz and blues. His elegant and lyrically generous body of work was not large in comparison with that of some of his contemporaries, but his compositions are notable for being meticulously and exquisitely crafted. He was especially gifted as an orchestrator, an area in which he remains unsurpassed. Ravel's mother was of Basque heritage, a fact that accounted for his lifelong fascination with Spanish music, and his father was a Swiss inventor and engineer, most likely the source of his commitment to precision and craftsmanship. At the age of 14, he entered the Paris Conservatory, where he was a student from 1889 to 1895 and from 1897 to 1903. His primary composition teacher was Gabriel Fauré. A major disappointment of his life was his failure to win the Prix de Rome in spite of numerous attempts. The difficulty was transparently the conflict between the conservative administration of the Conservatory and Ravel's independent thinking, meaning his association with the French avant-garde (Debussy), and his interest in non-French traditions (Wagner, the Russian nationalists, Balinese gamelan). He had already established himself as a composer of prominence with works such as his String Quartet, and the piano pieces Pavane pour une infante défunte, Jeux d'eaux, and the Sonatine, and his loss of the Prix de Rome in 1905 was considered such a scandal that the director of the Conservatory was forced to resign. Ravel continued to express admiration for Debussy's music throughout his life, but as his own reputation grew stronger during the first decade of the century, a mutual professional jealousy cooled their personal relationship. Around the same time, he developed a friendship with Igor Stravinsky. The two worked collaboratively on arrangements for Sergey Diaghilev and became familiar with each other's work during Stravinsky's time in Paris. Between 1909 and 1912, Ravel composed Daphnis et Chloé for Diaghilev and Les Ballets Russes. It was the composer's largest and most ambitious work and is widely considered his masterpiece. He wrote a second ballet for Diaghilev, La Valse, which the impresario rejected, but which went on to become one of his most popular orchestral works. Following his service in the First World War as an ambulance driver, and the death of his mother in 1917, his output was temporarily diminished. In 1925, the Monte Carlo Opera presented the premiere of another large work, the 'lyric fantasy' L'enfant et les sortilèges, a collaboration with writer Colette. American jazz and blues became increasingly intriguing to the composer. In 1928 he made a hugely successful tour of North America, where he met George Gershwin and had the opportunity to broaden his exposure to jazz. Several of his most important late works, such as the Sonata for Violin and Piano and the Piano Concerto in G show the influence of that interest. Ironically, Ravel, who in his youth was rejected by some elements of the French musical establishment for being a modernist, in his later years was scorned by Satie and the

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