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Rizzi, Marco

Picture: Rizzi, Marco

Milan (Italy), 1967. "He is a top class violinist with an extensive pallete of sound, beautiful technique and fascinating legato cantabile; a surprisingly honest and mature musician..." (STRAD). Starting with the 2007-2008 academic year, Marco Rizzi is Head of the Violin Chair of the Reina Sofía School of Music. Prizewinner in three of the most prestigious violin competitions: Moscow Tchaikovsky, Brussels Queen Elizabeth and the Indianapolis Violin Competition, Marco Rizzi is highly respected for the quality, forcefulness and deepness of his performances. Pupil of G. Magnani, S. Accardo and W.Lieberman, obtained in 1991 the Europäischen Musikförderpreis with the endorsement of Claudio Abbado. He is regularly invited to the most prestigious halls such as the Scala in Milan, Gaveau and Pleyel Halls in Paris, Lincoln Center in New York, Grand Hall at Moscow's Conservatory, Musikhalle in Hamburg, Tivoli in Copenhagen, Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Konzerthaus in Berlin. He has performed with conductors such as R.Chailly, H. Vonk, A. Ceccato, V. Jurowski, P. Eötvös and orchestras such as Dresden Staatskapelle, Indianapolis Symphony, Liverpool Philharmonic, Concerts Lamoreux, Hong Kong Philharmonic, Rotterdam Philharmonic, Madrid RTVE Symphony, Scottish BBC, Nederland's Philharmonic, and many others. Marco Rizzi each year enriches his repertory with a new. He has a vivid interest for less-known repertory pieces: B. Walter's Sonata, J. Adams Concerto, or Italian 19th Century, greatly acclaimed by the music world music together with his recordings of J. S. Bach sonatas and partitas. He has a special passion for chamber music and pedagogy. He has been Head Professor at Detmold and gives Master Classes at Enghien and Biella. Since 2008-2009 he is Head Professor at Mannheim. Marco Rizzi plays a 1742 Pietro Guarneri violin on loan from the Pro Canale Onlus Foundation. Since the 2007-2008 academic year, Rizzi is Head Professor of the Violin Chair of the Reina Sofía School of Music.

Biography

BACH, Johann Sebastian

Picture: BACH, Johann Sebastian

Eisenach, 1685 - Leipzig, 1750. Born into a musical family, Bach received his earliest instruction from his father. After his father's death in 1695, Bach moved to Ohrdruf, where he lived and studied organ with his older brother Johann Christoph. He also received an education at schools in Eisenach, Ohrdruf, and Lüneburg. Bach's first permanent positions were as organist in Arnstadt (1703-1707) and Mühlhausen (1707-1708). During these years, he performed, composed taught, and developed an interest in organ building. From 1708-1717 he was employed by Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar, first as court organist, and after 1714, as concertmaster. During this period, he composed many of his best organ compositions; in his capacity as concertmaster, he was also expected to produce a cantata each month. In Weimar, Bach's style was influenced by his study of numerous Italian compositions (especially Vivaldi concertos). Bach's next position, as Music Director for the Prince Leopold of Cüthen (1717-1723), involved entirely different activities. Since the court chapel was Calvinist, there was no need for church compositions; Bach probably used the Cüthen organs only for teaching and practice. His new works were primarily for instrumental solo or ensemble, to be used as court entertainment or for instruction. Among the important compositions at Cüthen were the Brandenburg Concertos, the first volume of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (The Well-Tempered Clavier), the "French" and "English" Suites for harpsichord (although the "English" Suites may be from the Weimar period), and most of the sonatas and suites for other instruments. In 1723, Bach was appointed cantor at the St. Thomas Church and School, and Director of Music for Leipzig, positions which he retained for the rest of his career. His official duties included the responsibility of overseeing the music in the four principal churches of the city, and organizing other musical events sponsored by the municipal council. During his first six years in Leipzig (1723-1729), Bach's most impressive compositions were his sacred cantatas (four yearly cycles), and the St. John and St. Matthew Passions. Bach apparently gave virtuoso organ recitals in Leipzig and on various tours, although he had no official position as organist in Leipzig. In 1729-1737 and 1739-1741, he was director of the Leipzig Collegium Musicum, an organization which had been founded by Telemann in 1704. This group of professional musicians and university students performed weekly concerts (out-of-doors in the summer, and at Zimmerman's coffee-house in the winter). Although no specific programs for these concerts have survived, Bach apparently revived and many of his instrumental compositions from Cüthen, wrote new works (e.g., secular cantatas), and conducted pieces by other composers. During the 1730s, Bach renewed his interest in keyboard compositions, and prepared the first three volumes of his Clavier-Übung (Keyboard Practice) for publication (1731, 1735, 1739); the fourth volume appeared in 1741-1742. In the 1730s, he also showed considerable interest in the royal court at Dresden, and was named "Hofkomponist" (court-composer") in Dresden in 1736. During Bach's last decade (the 1740s), he completed or revised several large-scale projects which he had started earlier. The Well-Tempered Clavier, Vol. II; a manuscript collection of chorale preludes (known as the "Leipzig 18", comprising revisions of Weimar pieces), and the B minor Mass. Other new works showed

Biography

  • BACH | Rizzi < Violin

    Sonata for violin and harpsichord no. 4 in C minor BWV 1017 (version for violin and piano)

    I. Siciliana. Largo

    CLASS 4534: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 1' 52''
  • BACH | Rizzi < Violin

    Sonata for violin and harpsichord no. 4 in C minor BWV 1017 (version for violin and piano)

    II. Allegro

    CLASS 4534: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 4' 31''
    Part - 7' 07''
  • BACH | Rizzi < Violin

    Sonata for violin and harpsichord no. 4 in C minor BWV 1017 (version for violin and piano)

    III. Adagio

    CLASS 4534: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 4' 04''
  • BACH | Rizzi < Violin

    Sonata for violin and harpsichord no. 4 in C minor BWV 1017 (version for violin and piano)

    IV. Allegro

    CLASS 4534: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 6' 41''
  • BACH | Rizzi < Violin

    Concerto for violin, string orchestra and basso continuo in A minor BWV 1041 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4473: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 20' 07''
  • BACH | Rizzi < Violin

    Concerto for violin, string orchestra and basso continuo in A minor BWV 1041 (violin and piano reduction)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4533: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 4' 22''
    Part - 7' 10''
    Part - 22' 52''
    Part - 1' 04''
  • BACH | Rizzi < Violin

    Concerto for violin, string orchestra and basso continuo in A minor BWV 1041 (violin and piano reduction)

    II. Andante

    CLASS 4473: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Part - 18' 18''

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