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Anchel, Víctor

Picture: Anchel, Víctor

Valencia (Spain), 1973. null

Biography

SCHOENBERG, Arnold

Picture: SCHOENBERG, Arnold

Vienna, 1874 - Los Angeles, 1951

Biography

  • SCHOENBERG | Anchel < Orquesta

    Sinfonía de cámara para orquesta núm. 2 op 38 (parte de vientos)

    I. Adagio

    CLASS 3786: [O.V.: Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 32' 54''
    Parte - 11' 09''
    Parte - 4' 44''
    Parte - 27' 05''
    Parte - 3' 11''
  • SCHOENBERG | Anchel < Orquesta

    Sinfonía de cámara para orquesta núm. 2 op 38 (parte de vientos)

    II. Con fuoco

    CLASS 3786: [O.V.: Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 10' 53''
    Parte - 10' 36''

Arad, Atar

Picture: Arad, Atar

Tel Aviv (Israel), 1945. Atar Arad (born 8 March 1945) is an Israeli American violist, professor of music, essayist and composer. He has performed in top venues around the world both as a featured soloist with orchestras in and as a member of the distinguished Cleveland Quartet from 1980 to 1987, taking the seat previously established by founding member Martha Strongin Katz. He was succeeded by James Dunham. Arad currently teaches at Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music in Bloomington, and at the Steans Institute for Young Artists at the Ravinia Festival in near Chicago as well as the Domaine Forget Music and Dance Academy in Quebec. Previously he was Professor of Viola at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. He has also taught at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University in Houston, and has been an artist/lecturer at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Prior to 1980 he served on faculties at Chapelle Musicale Reine Elisabeth and the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, England

Biography

BACH, Johann Sebastian

Picture: BACH, Johann Sebastian

Eisenach, 1685 - Leipzig, 1750. Born into a musical family, Bach received his earliest instruction from his father. After his father's death in 1695, Bach moved to Ohrdruf, where he lived and studied organ with his older brother Johann Christoph. He also received an education at schools in Eisenach, Ohrdruf, and Lüneburg. Bach's first permanent positions were as organist in Arnstadt (1703-1707) and Mühlhausen (1707-1708). During these years, he performed, composed taught, and developed an interest in organ building. From 1708-1717 he was employed by Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar, first as court organist, and after 1714, as concertmaster. During this period, he composed many of his best organ compositions; in his capacity as concertmaster, he was also expected to produce a cantata each month. In Weimar, Bach's style was influenced by his study of numerous Italian compositions (especially Vivaldi concertos). Bach's next position, as Music Director for the Prince Leopold of Cüthen (1717-1723), involved entirely different activities. Since the court chapel was Calvinist, there was no need for church compositions; Bach probably used the Cüthen organs only for teaching and practice. His new works were primarily for instrumental solo or ensemble, to be used as court entertainment or for instruction. Among the important compositions at Cüthen were the Brandenburg Concertos, the first volume of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (The Well-Tempered Clavier), the "French" and "English" Suites for harpsichord (although the "English" Suites may be from the Weimar period), and most of the sonatas and suites for other instruments. In 1723, Bach was appointed cantor at the St. Thomas Church and School, and Director of Music for Leipzig, positions which he retained for the rest of his career. His official duties included the responsibility of overseeing the music in the four principal churches of the city, and organizing other musical events sponsored by the municipal council. During his first six years in Leipzig (1723-1729), Bach's most impressive compositions were his sacred cantatas (four yearly cycles), and the St. John and St. Matthew Passions. Bach apparently gave virtuoso organ recitals in Leipzig and on various tours, although he had no official position as organist in Leipzig. In 1729-1737 and 1739-1741, he was director of the Leipzig Collegium Musicum, an organization which had been founded by Telemann in 1704. This group of professional musicians and university students performed weekly concerts (out-of-doors in the summer, and at Zimmerman's coffee-house in the winter). Although no specific programs for these concerts have survived, Bach apparently revived and many of his instrumental compositions from Cüthen, wrote new works (e.g., secular cantatas), and conducted pieces by other composers. During the 1730s, Bach renewed his interest in keyboard compositions, and prepared the first three volumes of his Clavier-Übung (Keyboard Practice) for publication (1731, 1735, 1739); the fourth volume appeared in 1741-1742. In the 1730s, he also showed considerable interest in the royal court at Dresden, and was named "Hofkomponist" (court-composer") in Dresden in 1736. During Bach's last decade (the 1740s), he completed or revised several large-scale projects which he had started earlier. The Well-Tempered Clavier, Vol. II; a manuscript collection of chorale preludes (known as the "Leipzig 18", comprising revisions of Weimar pieces), and the B minor Mass. Other new works showed

Biography

  • BACH | Arad < Viola

    Suite para violonchelo solo núm. 1 en sol mayor BWV 1007 (transcripción para viola)

    I. Prelude

    CLASS 6389: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 10' 56''

CLARKE, Rebecca

Picture: CLARKE, Rebecca

Harrow, 1886 - New York, 1979. Rebecca Clarke (Friskin) was an English classical composer and violist best known for her chamber music featuring the viola. She is considered by one commentator to be one of the most important British composers in the interwar period between World War I and World War II; she has also been described as the most distinguished British female composer of her generation. Though she wrote little, due in part to her ideas about the role of a female composer (see below), her work was recognized for its compositional skill. Most of Clarke's works have yet to be published (or have only recently been published), and her work was largely forgotten after she stopped composing. Scholarship and interest in her work revived when she reached her ninetieth birthday in 1976.

Biography

ENESCU, George

Picture: ENESCU, George

Liveni, 1881 - Paris, 1955. Enescu was a Romanian composer, violinist, pianist, conductor and teacher. He was born in the village of Liveni (later renamed "George Enescu" in his honor), Dorohoi County at the time, today Boto&#351;ani County. He showed musical talent from early in his childhood. A child prodigy, Enescu created his first musical composition at the age of five. Shortly thereafter, his father presented him to the professor and composer Eduard Caudella. At the age of seven, he entered the Vienna Conservatory, where he studied with Joseph Hellmesberger, Jr., Robert Fuchs, and Sigismund Bachrich. He graduated before his 13th birthday, earning the silver medal. In his Viennese concerts young Enescu played works by Brahms, Sarasate and Mendelssohn. In 1895 he went to Paris to continue his studies. He studied violin with Martin Pierre Marsick, harmony with André Gédalge, and composition with Jules Massenet and Gabriel Fauré. Many of Enescu's works were influenced by Romanian folk music, his most popular compositions being the two Romanian Rhapsodies (1901–2), the opera Œdipe (1936), and the suites for orchestra. He also wrote five symphonies (two of them unfinished), a symphonic poem Vox maris, and much chamber music (three sonatas for violin and piano, two for cello and piano, a piano trio, quartets with and without piano, a wind decet (French, "dixtuor"), an octet for strings, a piano quintet and a chamber symphony for twelve solo instruments). A young Ravi Shankar recalled in the 1960s how Enescu, who had developed a deep interest in Oriental music, rehearsed with Shankar's brother Uday Shankar and his musicians. Around the same time, Enescu took the young Yehudi Menuhin to the Colonial Exhibition in Paris, where he introduced him to the Gamelan Orchestra from Indonesia.[1] George Enescu Museum (Cantacuzino Palace), BucharestIn 1923 he made his debut as a conductor in a concert given by the Philadelphia Orchestra in New York City, and he subsequently made frequent returns to the United States. It was in America, in the 1920s, that Enescu was first persuaded to make recordings as a violinist. He also appeared as a conductor with many American orchestras, and in 1936 he was one of the candidates considered to replace Toscanini as permanent conductor of the New York Philharmonic.[2] In 1935, he conducted the Orchestre Symphonique de Paris and Yehudi Menuhin (who had been his pupil for several years starting in 1927) in Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major. He also conducted the New York Philharmonic between 1937 and 1938. In 1939 he married Maria Rosetti (known as the Princess Cantacuzino through her first husband Mihail Cantacuzino), a good friend of the future Queen Marie of Romania. While staying in Bucharest, Enescu lived in the Cantacuzino Palace on Calea Victoriei (now the Muzeu Na&#355;ional George Enescu, dedicated to his work). He lived in Paris and in Romania, but after World War II and the Soviet occupation of Romania, he remained in Paris. He was also a noted violin teacher. Yehudi Menuhin, Christian Ferras, Ivry Gitlis, Arthur Grumiaux, and Ida Haendel were among his pupils. He promoted contemporary Romanian music, playing works of Constantin Silvestri, Mihail Jora, Ionel Perlea and Mar&#355;ian Negrea. He was a National Patron of Delta Omicron, an international professional music fraternity.[3][not in citation given] On his death in 1955, George Enescu was interred in the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Today, Buc

Biography

SCHUMANN, Robert

Picture: SCHUMANN, Robert

Zwichau, 1810 - Endenich, 1856. Robert Schumann was born 8 June, 1810 in Zwickau, Germany. He was the son of a book publisher and writer. As a child, Robert Schumann showed early abilities in both music and literature, but was not considered a prodigy by any means. At sixteen, after the tragic deaths of his sister and father, he was sent to the University of Leipzig at his mother's insistence. He studied law there until he was able to convince his mother of his need to study music. In Leipzig, from 1830, he worked under the renowned piano teacher Friedrich Wieck, whose favourite daughter, Clara, was already a well-known piano prodigy. It is thought that Schumann and Clara were lovers by 1835. His own ambitions as a pianist were hampered by a weakness in the fingers of one hand (possibly caused by they syphilis that would later claim his sanity), but the 1830s nevertheless brought a number of marvellous compositions for the instrument. Robert Schumann's work is noted for its links to literature. Many of his compositions allude to characters or scenes from poems, novels, and plays; others are like musical crossword puzzles with key signatures or musical themes that refer to people or places important to him. This intimate relationship with the written word gives his music an extra dimension. At the same time, its sheer joyfulness ranks it among the best loved music of the age. Schumann was not only interested in literature, he was also a working journalist who edited his own influential musical magazine, the Neue Zeitsfchrift fur Musik. This put Schumann in a unique position: his music was often inspired by the world of words, while his work as writer and critic kept him in touch with the Romantic musical scene at large. Through his music journal he helped to bring the young Chopin and, later, the young Brahms to the attention of the German-speaking public. Schumann's courtship of and marriage to Clara Wieck is one of the most famous romances in music history. Clara's father was one of Schumann's piano teachers. He predicted a great future for his pupil, but he fiercely opposed the young man's request to marry his daughter. He not only disapproved of Schumann's drinking, he also wanted Clara to become a famous pianist in her own right. For years Friedrich did everything he could to keep Schumann and Clara apart. Schumann eventually took Wieck to court and obtained permission to marry her, but it had been a long and bitter struggle. Overall, Robert Schumann's early piano compositions, many of which were played by his wife Clara, are the most original and daring of his works. As a composer, he tended to concentrate on one type of music at a time. For instance, his songs qualify him as a worthy successor to Schubert. And while his great orchestral works remain closer to the traditional Classical forms of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, he is regarded as a talented, but not masterful. Nor was he successful as a composer of operas. It is in his piano music and his songs - Carnival ("Dainty Scenes on Four Notes") in particular - that he accomplished his greatest work. In 1850 Schumann was appointed Music Director to the city of Dusseldorf, where he enjoyed no great success. Suffering from hallucinations and rapidly declining mental facilities, he resigned in 1853. Mounting fears of insanity plunged Schumann into a serious mental break-down, and in 1854 he attempted suicide by throwing himself into the Rhine. He was then confined to an asylum at Endenich,

Biography

  • SCHUMANN | Arad < Viola

    Adagio y Allegro para trompa y piano en la bemol mayor op 70 (transcripción para viola y piano)

    I. Adagio

    CLASS 6392: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 30' 46''
  • SCHUMANN | Arad < Viola

    Adagio y Allegro para trompa y piano en la bemol mayor op 70 (transcripción para viola y piano)

    II. Allegro

    CLASS 6392: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 14' 57''
  • SCHUMANN | Arad < Viola

    Adagio y Allegro para trompa y piano en la bemol mayor op 70 (transcripción para viola y piano)

    CLASS 6392: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 11' 27''
    Parte - 2' 46''

STAMITZ, Carl

Picture: STAMITZ, Carl

Mannheim, 1745 - Jena, 1801. Karl Philipp Stamitz was a German composer of partial Czech ancestry (his mother was German), and a violin, viola and viola d'amore virtuoso. He was the most prominent representative of the second generation of the so-called Mannheim School. Carl Stamitz 1789He was the first composer to specify a left hand pizzicato (an important virtuoso device) in a composition.[1] This occurs in his famous viola concerto in D major where the passage in question is designated by an "0" above the notes. This happened decades before Paganini would designate the same effect with an "X" above the notes. A good composer of impeccable musical pedigree and training, he is particularly remembered for his melodious clarinet and viola concertos which are played to this day. Although a talented and prolific composer of great aspirations, he never succeeded in attaining an adequate position with one of the major princes or orchestras of his time &#150; whether for want of trying or because of his unsteady and itinerant lifestyle is not clear. He died in poverty; a small town music teacher who in his last years turned to alchemy in search of making gold. When nine years after his death (1810) his estate was put up for auction to cover his debts nothing was sold and all of it consequently lost.

Biography

  • STAMITZ | Arad < Viola

    Concierto para viola y orquesta en re mayor (reducción para viola y piano)

    I. Moderato

    CLASS 6390: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 45' 26''

WALTON, Sir William

Picture: WALTON, Sir William

Oldham, 1902 - Ischia, 1983. English composer. Noted above all for his orchestral music, he is one of the major figures to emerge in England between Vaughan Williams and Britten.

Biography

Ashkenazy, Vladimir

Picture: Ashkenazy, Vladimir

Gorky (Russia), 1937. In the years since Vladimir Ashkenazy first came to prominence on the world stage in the 1955 Chopin Competition in Warsaw he has built an extraordinary career, not only as one of the most renowned and revered pianists of our times, but as an artist whose creative life encompasses a vast range of activities and continues to offer inspiration to music-lovers across the world. Conducting has formed the largest part of his activities for the past 20 years. Formerly Chief Conductor of the Czech Philharmonic (1998 to 2003), Ashkenazy became Music Director of NHK Symphony Orchestra in Tokyo in 2004, and in January 2009 he will take up the new position of Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor to the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. A regular visitor to Sydney over many years, he already shares a warm relationship with the Orchestra. They will collaborate on a number of exciting projects including composer festivals, major recording projects and international touring activities. Alongside these positions, Ashkenazy continues his longstanding relationship with the Philharmonia Orchestra of which he was appointed Conductor Laureate in 2000. In addition to his performances with the orchestra in London and around the UK each season, he tours with them worldwide, and has developed landmark projects such as 'Prokofiev and Shostakovich Under Stalin' in 2003 (a project which he also took to Cologne, New York, Vienna and Moscow) and 'Rachmaninoff Revisited' in 2002 at the Lincoln Center, New York. Ashkenazy also holds the positions of Music Director of the European Union Youth Orchestra, with whom he tours each year, and Conductor Laureate of the Iceland Symphony Orchestra. He maintains strong links with a number of other major orchestras with whom he has built special relationships over the years, including the Cleveland Orchestra (of whom he was formerly Principal Guest Conductor), San Francisco Symphony and Deutsches Symphonie Orchester Berlin (Chief Conductor and Music Director 1988-96), as well as making guest appearances with many other major orchestras around the world. He will return to conduct the Berlin Philharmonic in October 2007. While conducting takes up a significant portion of his time each season, Ashkenazy continues to devote himself to the piano, these days mostly in the recording studio where he continues to build his extraordinarily comprehensive recording catalogue with releases such as the 1999 Grammy award-winning Shostakovich Preludes and Fugues, Rautavaara's Piano Concerto No.3 (a work which he commissioned) and Rachmaninov Transcriptions. Most recently released are his recordings of that most challenging and enriching of works, Bach's Wohltemperierte Klavier and released in June 2007, Beethoven's Diabelli Variations. Beyond his hectic and fulfilling performing schedule, Ashkenazy continues to be involved in some fascinating TV projects, often inspired by his passionate drive to ensure that serious music continues to have a platform in the mainstream media and is made available to as broad an audience as possible. Many will remember his programmes with the outstanding director Christopher Nupen, including in 1979 Music After Mao, filmed in Shanghai, and the extraordinary Ashkenazy in Moscow programmes which marked his first visit in 1989 to the country of his birth since leaving the USSR in the 1960s. More recently he has developed educational programmes with NHK TV including the 1999 Superteachers working with inner-city London school children, and in 2003-4 a documentary based around his 'Prokofiev and Shostakovich Under Stalin' project.

Biography

MAHLER, Gustav

Picture: MAHLER, Gustav

Kalischt, 1860 - Vienna, 1911

Biography

  • MAHLER | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Sinfonía núm. 1 en re mayor "Titán"

    III. Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen

    CLASS 6439: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 13' 44''
  • MAHLER | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Sinfonía núm. 1 en re mayor "Titán"

    III. Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen

    CLASS 6440: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 24' 53''

TCHAIKOVSKY, Pyotr Il'yich

Picture: TCHAIKOVSKY, Pyotr Il'yich

Kamsko-Votkinsk, 1840 - St Petersburg, 1893. He was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. His wide ranging output includes symphonies, operas, ballets, instrumental and chamber music and songs. He wrote some of the most popular concert and theatrical music in the classical repertoire, including the ballets Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, the 1812 Overture, his First Piano Concerto, his last three numbered symphonies, and the opera Eugene Onegin. Born into a middle-class family, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant, despite his obvious musical precocity. He pursued a musical career against the wishes of his family, entering the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1862 and graduating in 1865. This formal, Western-oriented training set him apart from the contemporary nationalistic movement embodied by the influential group of young Russian composers known as The Five, with whom Tchaikovsky's professional relationship was mixed. Although he enjoyed many popular successes, Tchaikovsky was never emotionally secure, and his life was punctuated by personal crises and periods of depression. Contributory factors were his suppressed homosexuality and fear of exposure, his disastrous marriage, and the sudden collapse of the one enduring relationship of his adult life, his 13-year association with the wealthy widow Nadezhda von Meck. Amid private turmoil Tchaikovsky's public reputation grew; he was honored by the Tsar, awarded a lifetime pension and lauded in the concert halls of the world. His sudden death at the age of 53 is generally ascribed to cholera, but some attribute it to suicide. Although perennially popular with concert audiences across the world, Tchaikovsky's music was often dismissed by critics in the early and mid-20th century as being vulgar and lacking in elevated thought. By the end of the 20th century, however, Tchaikovsky's status as a significant composer was generally regarded as secure.

Biography

  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    I. Allegro moderato - Moderato assai

    CLASS 4442: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 26' 11''
    Parte - 20' 23''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Música de cámara

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    I. Allegro moderato - Moderato assai

    CLASS 4445: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 26' 50''
    Parte - 24' 45''
    Parte - 18' 25''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    I. Allegro moderato - Moderato assai

    CLASS 6436: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 23' 20''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    I. Allegro moderato - Moderato assai

    CLASS 6437: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 23' 19''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    I. Allegro moderato - Moderato assai

    CLASS 6438: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 47''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    II. Canzonetta. Andante

    CLASS 4442: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 10' 13''
    Parte - 6' 47''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Música de cámara

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    II. Canzonetta. Andante

    CLASS 4445: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 22' 24''
    Parte - 9' 51''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    II. Canzonetta. Andante

    CLASS 6436: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 06''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    II. Canzonetta. Andante

    CLASS 6437: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 10' 10''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    II. Canzonetta. Andante

    CLASS 6438: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 10' 00''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    III. Final. Allegro vivacissimo

    CLASS 4442: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 21' 51''
    Parte - 11' 27''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Música de cámara

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    III. Final. Allegro vivacissimo

    CLASS 4445: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 12' 56''
    Parte - 7' 07''
    Parte - 13' 52''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    III. Final. Allegro vivacissimo

    CLASS 6436: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 18''
    Parte - 13' 29''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    III. Final. Allegro vivacissimo

    CLASS 6437: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 15' 24''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    III. Final. Allegro vivacissimo

    CLASS 6438: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 4' 33''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Ashkenazy < Orquesta

    Concierto para violín y orquesta en re mayor op 35

    III. Final. Allegro vivacissimo

    CLASS 6439: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 13''

Azzolini, Sergio

Picture: Azzolini, Sergio

Bolzano (Italy), 1967. Sergio Azzolini was born in 1967 in Bolzano where he studied the bassoon from 1978 to 1985 at the Claudio Monteverdi Conservatory of Music under the guidance of Romano Santi. After this, until 1989, he studied with Klaus Thunemann at the Hannover Advanced School of Music. While still studying he was principal solo bassoon of the European Community Youth Orchestra. Sergio Azzolini has attracted attention on himself through the many awards received in the international competitions of Ancona, Prague, Belgrade, Martigny, Bonn and München. The EMI record company has booked him for a number of chamber music productions. Besides his regular solo activity, Sergio Azzolini concentrates intensely on his ensemble Il Proteo, is a member of the Ma'alot Quintetts, of the Sabine Meyer Bläserensemble, of the Maurice Bourgue Trio, and several musical groups with original instruments. Following his activity as professor at the Stuttgart Advanced State School of Music, since 1998 he teaches the bassoon and chamber music at the Basle State Academy of Music.

Biography

BACH, Johann Sebastian

Picture: BACH, Johann Sebastian

Eisenach, 1685 - Leipzig, 1750. Born into a musical family, Bach received his earliest instruction from his father. After his father's death in 1695, Bach moved to Ohrdruf, where he lived and studied organ with his older brother Johann Christoph. He also received an education at schools in Eisenach, Ohrdruf, and Lüneburg. Bach's first permanent positions were as organist in Arnstadt (1703-1707) and Mühlhausen (1707-1708). During these years, he performed, composed taught, and developed an interest in organ building. From 1708-1717 he was employed by Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar, first as court organist, and after 1714, as concertmaster. During this period, he composed many of his best organ compositions; in his capacity as concertmaster, he was also expected to produce a cantata each month. In Weimar, Bach's style was influenced by his study of numerous Italian compositions (especially Vivaldi concertos). Bach's next position, as Music Director for the Prince Leopold of Cüthen (1717-1723), involved entirely different activities. Since the court chapel was Calvinist, there was no need for church compositions; Bach probably used the Cüthen organs only for teaching and practice. His new works were primarily for instrumental solo or ensemble, to be used as court entertainment or for instruction. Among the important compositions at Cüthen were the Brandenburg Concertos, the first volume of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (The Well-Tempered Clavier), the "French" and "English" Suites for harpsichord (although the "English" Suites may be from the Weimar period), and most of the sonatas and suites for other instruments. In 1723, Bach was appointed cantor at the St. Thomas Church and School, and Director of Music for Leipzig, positions which he retained for the rest of his career. His official duties included the responsibility of overseeing the music in the four principal churches of the city, and organizing other musical events sponsored by the municipal council. During his first six years in Leipzig (1723-1729), Bach's most impressive compositions were his sacred cantatas (four yearly cycles), and the St. John and St. Matthew Passions. Bach apparently gave virtuoso organ recitals in Leipzig and on various tours, although he had no official position as organist in Leipzig. In 1729-1737 and 1739-1741, he was director of the Leipzig Collegium Musicum, an organization which had been founded by Telemann in 1704. This group of professional musicians and university students performed weekly concerts (out-of-doors in the summer, and at Zimmerman's coffee-house in the winter). Although no specific programs for these concerts have survived, Bach apparently revived and many of his instrumental compositions from Cüthen, wrote new works (e.g., secular cantatas), and conducted pieces by other composers. During the 1730s, Bach renewed his interest in keyboard compositions, and prepared the first three volumes of his Clavier-Übung (Keyboard Practice) for publication (1731, 1735, 1739); the fourth volume appeared in 1741-1742. In the 1730s, he also showed considerable interest in the royal court at Dresden, and was named "Hofkomponist" (court-composer") in Dresden in 1736. During Bach's last decade (the 1740s), he completed or revised several large-scale projects which he had started earlier. The Well-Tempered Clavier, Vol. II; a manuscript collection of chorale preludes (known as the "Leipzig 18", comprising revisions of Weimar pieces), and the B minor Mass. Other new works showed

Biography

  • BACH | Azzolini < Fagot

    Suite para violonchelo solo núm. 2 en re menor BWV 1008 (transcripción para contrabajo)

    I. Prelude

    CLASS 727: [O.V.: English-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 9' 54''
    Parte - 1h 03' 31''
  • BACH | Azzolini < Fagot

    Suite para violonchelo solo núm. 2 en re menor BWV 1008 (transcripción para contrabajo)

    II. Allemande

    CLASS 727: [O.V.: English-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 30' 51''
  • BACH | Azzolini < Fagot

    Suite para violonchelo solo núm. 3 en do mayor BWV 1009 (transcripción para fagot)

    III. Courante

    CLASS 691: [O.V.: English-Spanish-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 42''
    Parte - 28' 06''
    Parte - 19' 04''
  • BACH | Azzolini < Fagot

    Suite para violonchelo solo núm. 3 en do mayor BWV 1009 (transcripción para fagot)

    II. Allemande

    CLASS 691: [O.V.: English-Spanish-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 15' 24''
  • BACH | Azzolini < Fagot

    Suite para violonchelo solo núm. 1 en sol mayor BWV 1007 (transcripción para fagot)

    III. Courante

    CLASS 693: [O.V.: Italian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1h 03' 06''
  • BACH | Azzolini < Fagot

    Suite para violonchelo solo núm. 4 en mi bemol mayor BWV 1010 (transcripción para fagot)

    I. Prélude

    CLASS 686: [O.V.: English-Italian] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Parte - 33' 26''
    Parte - 27' 44''

BOZZA, Eugène

Picture: BOZZA, Eugène

Niza, 1905 - Valenciennes, 1991. Compositor y violinista francés del siglo XX. Nació en Niza en 1905 y falleció en Valenciennes en 1991. Estudió en el Conservatorio Nacional Superior de Música de París y allí mismo recibió el Primer Premio de Violín, dirección de Orquesta y Composición. Además de estos premio consiguió en 1934 el Primer Gran Premio de Roma. Fue director titular de la orquesta de la Opera-Comique desde 1939 hasta 1948 y a partir de entonces fue director del conservatorio en Valenciennes Entre sus composiciones encontramos numerosas obras para orquesta, música de cámara, voz, piano y gran número de estudios para diversos instrumentos. En sus composiciones utiliza formas clásicas y un lenguaje tonal.

Biography

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

KALLIWODA, Johann Wenzel

Picture: KALLIWODA, Johann Wenzel

Prague, 1801 - Kalrsruhe, 1866.

Biography

  • KALLIWODA | Azzolini < Fagot

    Variaciones y rondó para fagot y orquesta en op 57 (reducción para fagot y piano)

    CLASS 698: [O.V.: Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 1h 03' 16''

MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Picture: MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Salzburg, 1756 - Vienna, 1791. Austrian composer from the Classical period. Regarded as one of the most prominent in the history of Western music. Born in Salzburg on 27 January 1756, baptized as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Studied with his father Leopold Mozart, a renowned composer and violinist who had a post at the court orchestra of the Archbishop of Salzburg. At the age of six Mozart was already a master keyboard player, an accomplished violinist, and showed extraordinary improvisation and sight-reading abilities.The five small pieces he composed at that age are still performed today. In 1762 Leopold took his son on performance tours to several courts in Europe. During that time he composed sonatas, for both hapsichord and violin (1763), a symphony (1764), an oratorio (1766) and the comic opera 'La finta semplice' (1768). In 1769 was appointed Konzertmeister at the Archbishopric of Salzburg, and at the Scala di Milano, Pope Clemens XIV created Mozart a Knight of the Golden Spur. That same year he composed 'Bastien und Bastienne', his first singspiel (an opera, usually comic and in German with spoken dialogue). The following year he was commissioned to compose his first opera, 'Mitridate, re di Ponto', which he wrote in Milan. That piece contributed to consolidate his reputation as an extraordinary musician. Mozart returned to Salzburg in 1771. His post in the city was not remunerated, but it allowed him to compose a great number of important works, that is, undermining his finances. In 1777 he was given permission to engage in a concerts tour, and he set out to Munich with his mother. At twenty-one, Mozart travelled the courts of Europe with the purpose to find a well-paid and satisfactory employment, but he didn't succeed. He went to Mannheim, the musical capital of Europe at the time, with the aim of finding a position in the orchestra, and there fell in love with Aloysia Weber. Leopold sent his wife and son to Paris. His mother's death in the French capital in 1778, together with Weber's rejection and the disdain from the aristocrats he worked for, made that two year period between his arrival in Paris and his return to Salzburg in 1779, one of the gloomiest in Mozart's life. Back in his hometown, Mozart composed two Masses and a great number of sonatas, symphonies and concertos. These works reveal, for the first time, a distinctive personal style and an exceptional musical maturity. The considerable success of his Italian opera 'Idomeneo, re di Creta', commissioned and composed in 1781, led to an invitation to visit the Archbishop of Salzburg in his palace in Vienna, but once there, Mozart felt offended at being treated like a servant and left. He then started teaching at a house that some friends rented for him. There he composed the singspiel 'Die Entführung aus dem Serail', commissioned in 1782 by Emperor Joseph II. The same year he married Constanze Weber, Alysia's younger sister; together they suffered chronic financial troubles until Mozart's death. The operas 'Le nozze di Figaro' (1786) and 'Don Giovanni' (1787), on librettos by Lorenzo Da Ponte, were not well received in Vienna in spite of having been a success in Prague. From 1787 until the creation of 'Così fan tutte' (1790, also on libretto by Da Ponte), Mozart didn't have any new commissions for operas. He composed 'La clemenza di Tito' for the coronation of emperor Leopold II in 1791, on a libretto by Metastasio. The great symphonies from 1788 No. 39 in E flat

Biography

  • MOZART | Azzolini < Fagot

    Concierto para fagot y orquesta en si bemol mayor K 191 (reducción para fagot y piano)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 730: [O.V.: English-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 1h 02' 58''

VERESS, Sándor

Picture: VERESS, Sándor

Cluj-Napoca, 1907 - Berne, 1992. null

Biography

  • VERESS | Azzolini < Música de cámara

    Sonatina para oboe, clarinete y fagot

    II. Andante - Allegretto - Tempo I

    CLASS 719: [O.V.: English-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 35' 30''

VILLA-LOBOS, Heitor

Picture: VILLA-LOBOS, Heitor

Rio de Janeiro, 1887 - Rio de Janeiro, 1959. Compositor brasileño. Heitor Villa-Lobos permanece como la única figura creativa más importante del arte musical brasileño del siglo XX. Su relevancia radica no sólo en su reconocimiento internacional, sino que viene de sus logros en la creación de estilos compositivos únicos en los cuales son combinados las técnicas europeas contemporáneas y los elementos reinterpretados de música nacional. Su carrera ampliamente exitosa sirve como modelo para generaciones siguientes de compositores brasileños.

Biography

  • VILLA-LOBOS | Azzolini < Música de cámara

    Trío para oboe, clarinete y fagot

    I. Animé

    CLASS 705: [O.V.: English-Spanish-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 28' 12''
    Parte - 40' 30''
  • VILLA-LOBOS | Azzolini < Fagot

    Ciranda das sete notas (Ciranda de las siete notas), fantasía para fagot y orquesta (reducción para fagot y piano)

    CLASS 710: [O.V.: Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 1h 43' 51''

WEBER, Carl Maria von

Picture: WEBER, Carl Maria von

Eutin, 1786 - London, 1826. Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber was a German composer, conductor, pianist, guitarist and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romantic school. Weber's operas Der Freischütz, Euryanthe and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantic opera in Germany. His compositions for the clarinet, which include two concertos, a concertino, a quintet and a duo concertante, are regularly performed today. His piano music&#151;including four sonatas, two concertos and the Konzertstück (Concert Piece) in F minor&#151;influenced composers such as Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt and Felix Mendelssohn. The Konzertstück provided a new model for the one-movement concerto in several contrasting sections (such as Liszt's, who often played the work), and was acknowledged by Igor Stravinsky as the model for his Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra. Weber's Invitation to the Dance was later orchestrated by Hector Berlioz and his Polacca Brillante was later orchestrated by Franz Liszt. An innovative composer, Weber's concertino for horn requires the performer to simultaneously produce two notes by humming while playing - a technique known in brass playing as multiphonics. Weber's contribution to vocal and choral music is also significant. His body of Catholic religious music was highly popular in 19th century Germany, and he composed one of the earliest song-cycles, Die Temperamente beim Verluste der Geliebten (Four Temperaments on the Loss of a Lover). Weber was also notable as one of the first conductors to conduct without a piano or violin. Weber's orchestration has also been highly praised and emulated by later generations of composers - Hector Berlioz referred to him several times in his Treatise on Instrumentation while Claude Debussy remarked that the sound of the Weber orchestra was obtained through the scrutiny of the soul of each instrument. His operas influenced the work of later opera composers, especially in Germany, such as Heinrich Marschner, Giacomo Meyerbeer and Richard Wagner, as well as several nationalist 19th-century composers such as Mikhail Glinka. Homage has been paid Weber by 20th century composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky, Gustav Mahler (who completed Weber's unfinished comic opera Die drei Pintos and made revisions of Euryanthe and Oberon) and Paul Hindemith (composer of the popular Symphonic Metamorphoses on Themes of Weber). Weber also wrote music journalism and was interested in folksong, and learned lithography to engrave his own works.

Biography

  • WEBER | Azzolini < Fagot

    Concierto para fagot y orquesta en fa mayor J 127 op 75 (reducción para fagot y piano)

    I. Allegro ma non troppo

    CLASS 713: [O.V.: English-Spanish-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 1h 36' 34''
    Parte - 10' 00''

ZELENKA, Jan Dismas

Picture: ZELENKA, Jan Dismas

Lounovice pod Blaníkem, Bohemia, 1679 - Dresden, 1745

Biography

  • ZELENKA | Azzolini < Música de cámara

    Sonata para 2 oboes, fagot y bajo continuo núm. 2 en sol menor

    I. Andante

    CLASS 732: [O.V.: Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 46' 34''
    Parte - 5' 58''
    Parte - 41' 56''
  • ZELENKA | Azzolini < Música de cámara

    Sonata para 2 oboes, fagot y bajo continuo núm. 2 en sol menor

    II. Allegro

    CLASS 732: [O.V.: Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 7' 24''

Baborák, Radek

Picture: Baborák, Radek

Pardubice (Czech Republic), 1976. null

Biography

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Baborák < Trompa

    Sinfonía núm. 9 en re menor op 125 (parte de trompa)

    III. Adagio molto e cantabile

    CLASS 4105: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 59''
  • BEETHOVEN | Baborák < Trompa

    Sinfonía núm. 7 en la mayor op 92 (parte de trompa)

    I. Poco sostenuto - Vivace

    CLASS 4105: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 4' 51''

BOZZA, Eugène

Picture: BOZZA, Eugène

Niza, 1905 - Valenciennes, 1991. Compositor y violinista francés del siglo XX. Nació en Niza en 1905 y falleció en Valenciennes en 1991. Estudió en el Conservatorio Nacional Superior de Música de París y allí mismo recibió el Primer Premio de Violín, dirección de Orquesta y Composición. Además de estos premio consiguió en 1934 el Primer Gran Premio de Roma. Fue director titular de la orquesta de la Opera-Comique desde 1939 hasta 1948 y a partir de entonces fue director del conservatorio en Valenciennes Entre sus composiciones encontramos numerosas obras para orquesta, música de cámara, voz, piano y gran número de estudios para diversos instrumentos. En sus composiciones utiliza formas clásicas y un lenguaje tonal.

Biography

BRAHMS, Johannes

Picture: BRAHMS, Johannes

Hamburg, 1833 - Vienna, 1897. Brahms was born in Hamburg. His father, who gave him his first music lessons, was a double bassist. Brahms showed early promise on the piano and helped to supplement the rather meager family income by playing the piano in restaurants and theaters, as well as by teaching. Although it is a widely-told tale that Brahms had to play the piano in bars and brothels, recent research, for example that by Kurt Hoffman, suggest that this is probably false. For a time, he also learned the violoncello, although his progress was cut short when his teacher absconded with Brahms's instrument. The young Brahms gave a few public concerts, but did not become well known as a pianist (although in later life he gave the premieres of both his Piano Concerto No. 1 in 1859 and his Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1881). He also began to compose, but his efforts did not receive much attention until he went on a concert tour with Eduard Reményi in 1853. On this tour he met Joseph Joachim, Franz Liszt, and later was introduced to the great German composer Robert Schumann. Reményi was, however, offended by Brahms' failure to praise Liszt's 'Sonata in B minor' wholeheartedly on a visit to the Court of Weimar where Liszt was the court musician. Many of Brahms' friends cited that Reményi, being the polished courtier, had expected the younger Brahms to conform to common practice of politely applauding a celebrity's piece which Brahms either failed to do or did not appear to do so with condescending compliment. He told Brahms that their friendship must end although it was not clear as to whether Liszt felt offended or otherwise. Joachim, however was to become one of his closest friends, and Schumann, through articles championing the young Brahms, played an important role in alerting the public to the young man's compositions. Brahms also became acquainted with Schumann's wife, the composer and pianist Clara, 14 years his senior, with whom he carried on a lifelong, emotionally passionate, but always platonic relationship. Brahms never married. In 1862 he settled permanently in Vienna and began to concentrate fully on composing. With work such as the German Requiem, Brahms eventually established a strong reputation and came to be regarded in his own lifetime as one of the great composers. This may have given him the confidence finally to complete his first symphony; this appeared in 1876, after about ten years of work. The other three symphonies then followed in fairly rapid succession (1877, 1883, 1885). Brahms frequently traveled, both for business (concert tours) and pleasure. He often visited Italy in the springtime, and usually sought out a pleasant rural location in which to compose during the summer. In 1890, the 57-year-old Brahms resolved to give up composing. However, as it turned out, he was unable to abide by his decision, and in the years before his death he produced a number of acknowledged masterpieces, including the two clarinet sonatas Op. 120 (1894) and the Four Serious Songs (Vier ernste Gesänge) Op. 121 (1896). While completing the Op. 121 songs Brahms fell ill of cancer (sources differ on whether this was of the liver or pancreas). His condition gradually worsened and he died on April 3, 1897. Brahms is buried in the Zentralfriedhof in Vienna.

Biography

BRUCKNER, Anton

Picture: BRUCKNER, Anton

Ansfelden, 1824 - Viena, 1896

Biography

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

GLIER, Reyngol'd Moritsevich

Picture: GLIER, Reyngol'd Moritsevich

Kiev, 1875 - Moscow, 1956

Biography

  • GLIER | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta op 91 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    II. Andante

    CLASS 4063: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 17' 44''
    Parte - 19' 03''
  • GLIER | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta op 91 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    III. Moderato - Allegro vivace

    CLASS 4063: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 14' 15''

HÄNDEL, George Frideric

Picture: HÄNDEL, George Frideric

The Hague, 1685 - London, 1759

Biography

  • HÄNDEL | Baborák < Trompa

    Water Music (Música acuática) para orquesta HWV 348 (arreglo para seis trompas de L. Martinet)

    Aria (Allegro moderato)

    CLASS 4104: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 18' 43''

HUMMEL, Johann Nepomuk

Picture: HUMMEL, Johann Nepomuk

Pressburg, 1778 - Weimar, 1837

Biography

  • HUMMEL | Baborák < Música de cámara

    Partita para dos clarinetes, dos oboes, dos trompas y dos fagotes en mi bemol mayor

    I. Allegro con spirito

    CLASS 4086: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 34' 53''
  • HUMMEL | Baborák < Música de cámara

    Partita para dos clarinetes, dos oboes, dos trompas y dos fagotes en mi bemol mayor

    II. Andante

    CLASS 4086: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 9' 07''
  • HUMMEL | Baborák < Música de cámara

    Partita para dos clarinetes, dos oboes, dos trompas y dos fagotes en mi bemol mayor

    III. Vivace Assai

    CLASS 4086: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 12' 14''

KIEL, Clemens August

Picture: KIEL, Clemens August

Wiesbaden - Detmold

Biography

  • KIEL | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en fa mayor op 23 (parte de trompa)

    I. Allegro appassionato

    CLASS 4068: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 15' 04''
  • KIEL | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en fa mayor op 23 (parte de trompa)

    II. Larghetto con moto

    CLASS 4068: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 10' 11''
  • KIEL | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en fa mayor op 23 (parte de trompa)

    III. Rondo. Allegretto

    CLASS 4068: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 40''
    Parte - 15' 06''

KIRCHNER, Volker David

Picture: KIRCHNER, Volker David

Mainz, 1942

Biography

MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Picture: MOZART, Wolfgang Amadeus

Salzburg, 1756 - Vienna, 1791. Austrian composer from the Classical period. Regarded as one of the most prominent in the history of Western music. Born in Salzburg on 27 January 1756, baptized as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Studied with his father Leopold Mozart, a renowned composer and violinist who had a post at the court orchestra of the Archbishop of Salzburg. At the age of six Mozart was already a master keyboard player, an accomplished violinist, and showed extraordinary improvisation and sight-reading abilities.The five small pieces he composed at that age are still performed today. In 1762 Leopold took his son on performance tours to several courts in Europe. During that time he composed sonatas, for both hapsichord and violin (1763), a symphony (1764), an oratorio (1766) and the comic opera 'La finta semplice' (1768). In 1769 was appointed Konzertmeister at the Archbishopric of Salzburg, and at the Scala di Milano, Pope Clemens XIV created Mozart a Knight of the Golden Spur. That same year he composed 'Bastien und Bastienne', his first singspiel (an opera, usually comic and in German with spoken dialogue). The following year he was commissioned to compose his first opera, 'Mitridate, re di Ponto', which he wrote in Milan. That piece contributed to consolidate his reputation as an extraordinary musician. Mozart returned to Salzburg in 1771. His post in the city was not remunerated, but it allowed him to compose a great number of important works, that is, undermining his finances. In 1777 he was given permission to engage in a concerts tour, and he set out to Munich with his mother. At twenty-one, Mozart travelled the courts of Europe with the purpose to find a well-paid and satisfactory employment, but he didn't succeed. He went to Mannheim, the musical capital of Europe at the time, with the aim of finding a position in the orchestra, and there fell in love with Aloysia Weber. Leopold sent his wife and son to Paris. His mother's death in the French capital in 1778, together with Weber's rejection and the disdain from the aristocrats he worked for, made that two year period between his arrival in Paris and his return to Salzburg in 1779, one of the gloomiest in Mozart's life. Back in his hometown, Mozart composed two Masses and a great number of sonatas, symphonies and concertos. These works reveal, for the first time, a distinctive personal style and an exceptional musical maturity. The considerable success of his Italian opera 'Idomeneo, re di Creta', commissioned and composed in 1781, led to an invitation to visit the Archbishop of Salzburg in his palace in Vienna, but once there, Mozart felt offended at being treated like a servant and left. He then started teaching at a house that some friends rented for him. There he composed the singspiel 'Die Entführung aus dem Serail', commissioned in 1782 by Emperor Joseph II. The same year he married Constanze Weber, Alysia's younger sister; together they suffered chronic financial troubles until Mozart's death. The operas 'Le nozze di Figaro' (1786) and 'Don Giovanni' (1787), on librettos by Lorenzo Da Ponte, were not well received in Vienna in spite of having been a success in Prague. From 1787 until the creation of 'Così fan tutte' (1790, also on libretto by Da Ponte), Mozart didn't have any new commissions for operas. He composed 'La clemenza di Tito' for the coronation of emperor Leopold II in 1791, on a libretto by Metastasio. The great symphonies from 1788 No. 39 in E flat

Biography

  • MOZART | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en mi bemol mayor K 495 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 4052: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 47' 44''
  • MOZART | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en mi bemol mayor K 495 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 4059: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 10' 14''
    Parte - 26' 44''
  • MOZART | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en mi bemol mayor K 495 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 4083: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 38' 02''
  • MOZART | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en mi bemol mayor K 495 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    II. Romanza. Andante

    CLASS 4059: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 6' 45''
  • MOZART | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en mi bemol mayor K 495 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    II. Romanza. Andante

    CLASS 4080: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 27' 15''
  • MOZART | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en mi bemol mayor K 495 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    II. Romanza. Andante

    CLASS 4083: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 12' 44''
  • MOZART | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta en mi bemol mayor K 495 (parte de trompa)

    I. Allegro moderato

    CLASS 4052: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 28''

STRAUSS, Richard

Picture: STRAUSS, Richard

Munich, 1864 - Garmisch-Partenkirchen, 1949. German composer and conductor. He emerged soon after the deaths of Wagner and Brahms as the most important living German composer. During an artistic career which spanned nearly eight decades, he composed in virtually all musical genres, but became best known for his tone poems (composed during the closing years of the 19th century) and his operas (from the early decades of the 20th). Coming of age as a composer at a time when the duality of bourgeois and artist had become increasingly problematic, Strauss negotiated the worlds of art and society with a remarkable combination of candour and irony. Averse to the metaphysics of Wagner and indifferent to Mahler's philosophical intentions in music, Strauss exploited instead the paradoxes, inconsistencies and potential profundities to be found in modern, everyday life. The new possibilities he envisioned for music were exemplified in the eclecticism of the opera Der Rosenkavalier, in which the juxtaposition of contemporary with intentionally anachronistic elements creates a stylistic pluralism that adumbrates subsequent experimentation of the later 20th century.

Biography

  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4054: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 27''
    Parte - 13' 51''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4067: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 28' 23''
    Parte - 2' 18''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4105: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 53''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    II. Andante

    CLASS 4065: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 14' 12''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    II. Andante

    CLASS 4067: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 9' 08''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (reducción para trompa y piano)

    III. Allegro - Rondo - Allegro

    CLASS 4105: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 6' 47''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (parte de trompa)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4054: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 27' 33''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (parte de trompa)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4065: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 50''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (parte de trompa)

    I. Allegro

    CLASS 4101: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 13' 56''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (parte de trompa)

    II. Andante

    CLASS 4065: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 17' 43''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (parte de trompa)

    II. Andante

    CLASS 4101: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 14' 02''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (parte de trompa)

    III. Allegro - Rondo - Allegro

    CLASS 4065: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 13' 46''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Concierto para trompa y orquesta núm. 1 en mi bemol mayor op 11 (parte de trompa)

    III. Allegro - Rondo - Allegro

    CLASS 4101: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 25' 40''
  • STRAUSS | Baborák < Trompa

    Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche (Las travesuras de Till Eulenspiegel) para orquesta op 28 (parte de trompa)

    CLASS 4105: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 4' 06''
    Parte - 4' 58''

TCHAIKOVSKY, Pyotr Il'yich

Picture: TCHAIKOVSKY, Pyotr Il'yich

Kamsko-Votkinsk, 1840 - St Petersburg, 1893. He was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. His wide ranging output includes symphonies, operas, ballets, instrumental and chamber music and songs. He wrote some of the most popular concert and theatrical music in the classical repertoire, including the ballets Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, the 1812 Overture, his First Piano Concerto, his last three numbered symphonies, and the opera Eugene Onegin. Born into a middle-class family, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant, despite his obvious musical precocity. He pursued a musical career against the wishes of his family, entering the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1862 and graduating in 1865. This formal, Western-oriented training set him apart from the contemporary nationalistic movement embodied by the influential group of young Russian composers known as The Five, with whom Tchaikovsky's professional relationship was mixed. Although he enjoyed many popular successes, Tchaikovsky was never emotionally secure, and his life was punctuated by personal crises and periods of depression. Contributory factors were his suppressed homosexuality and fear of exposure, his disastrous marriage, and the sudden collapse of the one enduring relationship of his adult life, his 13-year association with the wealthy widow Nadezhda von Meck. Amid private turmoil Tchaikovsky's public reputation grew; he was honored by the Tsar, awarded a lifetime pension and lauded in the concert halls of the world. His sudden death at the age of 53 is generally ascribed to cholera, but some attribute it to suicide. Although perennially popular with concert audiences across the world, Tchaikovsky's music was often dismissed by critics in the early and mid-20th century as being vulgar and lacking in elevated thought. By the end of the 20th century, however, Tchaikovsky's status as a significant composer was generally regarded as secure.

Biography

  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Baborák < Trompa

    Sinfonía núm. 5 en mi menor op 64 (parte de trompa)

    II. Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza

    CLASS 4105: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 7' 59''

WAGNER, Richard

Picture: WAGNER, Richard

Leipzig, 1813 - Venice, 1883. Composer. One of the key figures in the history of opera, Wagner was largely responsible for altering its orientation in the 19th century. His programme of artistic reform, though not executed to the last detail, accelerated the trend towards organically conceived, through-composed structures, as well as influencing the development of the orchestra, of a new breed of singer, and of various aspects of theatrical practice.

Biography

Barrios, Alexander

Picture: Barrios, Alexander

Venezuela. null

Biography

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

  • GENERALITIES | Barrios < Trompeta

    Explicaciones teóricas

    CLASS 9800: [O.V.: Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 0' 39''
    Parte - 11' 26''
    Parte - 7' 52''
    Parte - 10' 13''
    Parte - 13' 37''
    Parte - 13' 37''
    Parte - 12' 26''
    Parte - 8' 44''
    Parte - 10' 38''
    Parte - 5' 02''
    Parte - 9' 46''
    Parte - 8' 54''
    Parte - 1' 32''

Bashkirov, Dimitri

Picture: Bashkirov, Dimitri

Tiflis (Georgia), 1931. Dimitri Bashkirov was born in Tiflis, Georgia. He started his studies with his family in that city, continuing his education later with Anastasia Wirsaladze at the Tiflis Conservatory and with Alexander Goldenweiser at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow. In 1955 he won the first prize at the Marguerite Long-Jacques Thibaud Piano Competition, in Paris. Since then he has performed with numerous European and United States of America orchestras, among them the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Paris Orchestra, the Royal Philharmonic and the Israel Philharmonic. He has also appeared with conductors such as Vladimir Ashkenazy, Daniel Barenboim, Kurt Masur, Zubin Mehta and Wolfgang Sawallisch, among others. He has played chamber music with the violinist Igor Bezrodny and the cellist Mikhail Komnitzer. In 1957 he started his extensive teaching career at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow and at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris, the Mozarteum in Salzburg, the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, and at the Encuentro de Música y Academia in Santander. He has published several studies in Sovetskaya Muzïka. Since the inauguration in 1991 of the Reina Sofía School of Music, Dimitri Bashkirov is Head Professor of the Piano Chair, sponsored by the Banco Santander Foundation.

Biography

ALBÉNIZ, Isaac

Picture: ALBÉNIZ, Isaac

Camprodón, 1860 - Cambo-les-Bains, 1909. Born in Camprodon, province of Girona, to Ángel Albéniz (a customs official) and his wife Dolors Pascual, Albéniz was a child prodigy who first performed at the age of four. At age seven, after apparently taking lessons from Antoine Marmontel, he passed the entrance examination for piano at the Paris Conservatoire, but he was refused admission because he was believed to be too young. His concert career began at the young age of nine when his father toured both Isaac and his sister, Clementina, throughout northern Spain. By the time he had reached 12, he had made many attempts to run away from home. At the age of 12 he stowed away in a ship bound for Buenos Aires. He then made his way via Cuba to the United States, giving concerts in New York and San Francisco and then travelled to Liverpool, London and Leipzig. By age 15, he had already given concerts worldwide. After a short stay at the Leipzig Conservatory, in 1876 he went to study in Brussels. In 1880, he went to Budapest to study with Franz Liszt, only to find out that Liszt was in Weimar, Germany. In 1883, he met the teacher and composer Felip Pedrell, who inspired him to write Spanish music such as the Chants d'Espagne. The first movement (Prelude) of that suite, later retitled after the composer's death as Asturias (Leyenda), is probably most famous today as part of the classical guitar repertoire, even though it was originally composed for piano and only later transcribed. (Many of Albéniz's other compositions were also transcribed for guitar, notably by Francisco Tárrega &#151; Albéniz once declared that he preferred Tárrega's guitar transcriptions to his original piano works). At the 1888 Universal Exposition in Barcelona, the piano manufacturer Erard sponsored a series of 20 concerts featuring Albéniz's music. The apex of his concert career is considered to be 1889 to 1892 when he had concert tours throughout Europe. During the 1890s Albéniz lived in London and Paris. For London he wrote some musical comedies which brought him to the attention of the wealthy Francis Money-Coutts, 5th Baron Latymer. Money-Coutts commissioned and provided him with librettos for the opera Henry Clifford and for a projected trilogy of Arthurian operas. The first of these, Merlin (1898&#150;1902) was thought to have been lost, but has recently been reconstructed and successfully performed; Albéniz never completed Lancelot (only the first act is finished, as a vocal and piano score), and he never began Guinevere, the final part. In 1900 he started to suffer from Bright's disease and returned to writing piano music. Between 1905 and 1908 he composed his final masterpiece, Iberia (1908), a suite of twelve piano "impressions". In 1883, the composer married his student Rosina Jordana. They had three children, Blanca (who died in 1886), Laura (a painter), and Alfonso (who played for Real Madrid in the early 1900s before embarking on a career as a diplomat). Two other children died in infancy. Albéniz died on 18 May 1909 at age 48 in Cambo-les-Bains of Bright's disease, and is buried in the Cementiri del Sudoest at Monjuïc, Barcelona.

Biography

  • ALBÉNIZ | Bashkirov < Piano

    Iberia para piano solo T 105

    El Albaicín

    CLASS 1395: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 27''
    Parte - 0' 55''
    Parte - 9' 36''
    Parte - 1' 06''

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano núm. 31 en la bemol mayor op 110

    III. Adagio, ma non troppo (Arioso dolente)

    CLASS 7166: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 16' 54''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano núm. 31 en la bemol mayor op 110

    IV. Fuga. Allegro, ma non troppo

    CLASS 7166: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 25' 17''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano núm. 8 en do menor op 13 "Patética"

    II. Adagio cantabile

    CLASS 3772: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 37''
    Parte - 6' 18''
    Parte - 6' 18''
    Parte - 6' 40''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Thema. Allegro

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 55''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation I

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 56''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation II

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 32''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation III

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 0' 37''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation IV

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 13''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation V

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 31''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation VI

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 08''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation VII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 12''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation VIII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 0' 52''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation IX

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 42''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation X

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 53''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XI

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 12''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 6' 30''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XIII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 44''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XIV

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 43''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XV

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 57''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XVII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 02''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XVIII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 24''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XIX

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 06''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XXI

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 32''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XXII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 07''
    Parte - 1' 52''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XXIV

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 0' 59''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XXV

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 40''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XXVII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 4' 55''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XXVI

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 10''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    32 Variaciones sobre un tema original para piano en do menor WoO 80

    Variation XXVIII

    CLASS 7189: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 22''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano núm. 9 en mi mayor op 14 núm. 1

    III. Rondo. Allegro comodo

    CLASS 3730: [O.V.: German]

    Content

    Parte - 16' 00''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano núm. 16 en sol mayor op 31 núm. 1

    I. Allegro vivace

    CLASS 7174: [O.V.: English-German-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 58''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano núm. 16 en sol mayor op 31 núm. 1

    II. Adagio grazioso

    CLASS 7174: [O.V.: English-German-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 26' 22''
  • BEETHOVEN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano núm. 16 en sol mayor op 31 núm. 1

    III. Rondo. Allegro

    CLASS 7174: [O.V.: English-German-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 6' 24''

BRAHMS, Johannes

Picture: BRAHMS, Johannes

Hamburg, 1833 - Vienna, 1897. Brahms was born in Hamburg. His father, who gave him his first music lessons, was a double bassist. Brahms showed early promise on the piano and helped to supplement the rather meager family income by playing the piano in restaurants and theaters, as well as by teaching. Although it is a widely-told tale that Brahms had to play the piano in bars and brothels, recent research, for example that by Kurt Hoffman, suggest that this is probably false. For a time, he also learned the violoncello, although his progress was cut short when his teacher absconded with Brahms's instrument. The young Brahms gave a few public concerts, but did not become well known as a pianist (although in later life he gave the premieres of both his Piano Concerto No. 1 in 1859 and his Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1881). He also began to compose, but his efforts did not receive much attention until he went on a concert tour with Eduard Reményi in 1853. On this tour he met Joseph Joachim, Franz Liszt, and later was introduced to the great German composer Robert Schumann. Reményi was, however, offended by Brahms' failure to praise Liszt's 'Sonata in B minor' wholeheartedly on a visit to the Court of Weimar where Liszt was the court musician. Many of Brahms' friends cited that Reményi, being the polished courtier, had expected the younger Brahms to conform to common practice of politely applauding a celebrity's piece which Brahms either failed to do or did not appear to do so with condescending compliment. He told Brahms that their friendship must end although it was not clear as to whether Liszt felt offended or otherwise. Joachim, however was to become one of his closest friends, and Schumann, through articles championing the young Brahms, played an important role in alerting the public to the young man's compositions. Brahms also became acquainted with Schumann's wife, the composer and pianist Clara, 14 years his senior, with whom he carried on a lifelong, emotionally passionate, but always platonic relationship. Brahms never married. In 1862 he settled permanently in Vienna and began to concentrate fully on composing. With work such as the German Requiem, Brahms eventually established a strong reputation and came to be regarded in his own lifetime as one of the great composers. This may have given him the confidence finally to complete his first symphony; this appeared in 1876, after about ten years of work. The other three symphonies then followed in fairly rapid succession (1877, 1883, 1885). Brahms frequently traveled, both for business (concert tours) and pleasure. He often visited Italy in the springtime, and usually sought out a pleasant rural location in which to compose during the summer. In 1890, the 57-year-old Brahms resolved to give up composing. However, as it turned out, he was unable to abide by his decision, and in the years before his death he produced a number of acknowledged masterpieces, including the two clarinet sonatas Op. 120 (1894) and the Four Serious Songs (Vier ernste Gesänge) Op. 121 (1896). While completing the Op. 121 songs Brahms fell ill of cancer (sources differ on whether this was of the liver or pancreas). His condition gradually worsened and he died on April 3, 1897. Brahms is buried in the Zentralfriedhof in Vienna.

Biography

CHOPIN, Fryderyck Franciszek

Picture: CHOPIN, Fryderyck Franciszek

Zelazowa Wola, 1810 - Paris, 1849. Frédéric Chopin, a Polish composer and pianist, was one of the creators of the typically romantic character piece. All of his works include the piano. He was born on February 22, 1810, near Warsaw, Poland. At an early age, Chopin displayed artistic talents&#151;he was an artist, wrote poetry, and played piano without any formal instruction. The gifted child also began composing his own music and had his first piece of music published when he was just seven years old. In 1826 Chopin became a full-time student at Elsner's conservatory, where he received an excellent foundation in theory, harmony, and melody. Elsner, after recognizing that Chopin's style was too original to force into traditional patterns, granted Chopin the freedom to develop along clear personal lines. After visiting Berlin, Germany, where Chopin was exposed to the music of George Frederick Handel (1685-1759) and Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847), Chopin returned to Warsaw and heard Nicolò Paganini (1782-1840). Chopin recognized that he must leave Warsaw for exposure to other musicians. He went to Vienna, Austria, to try to arrange the publication of several of his works. After a successful debut at the Kärntnerthor Theater on August 11, 1829, he returned home only to prepare for a concert tour, this time through Germany and Italy. In Vienna Chopin composed the B Minor Scherzo and the G Minor Ballade, as well as others that demonstrated Chopin's fully developed personal style. When the twenty-year-old Chopin arrived in Paris, poor physical health prevented him from giving public performances. Nevertheless, he became a significant figure in Parisian artistic circles, numbering among his friends musicians, writers, and painters, as well as many wealthy and talented women. Chopin recognized that he did not have the stamina (strength) to compete in public against such talents as Franz Liszt (1811-1886) and Sigismund Thalberg (1812-1871). So long as he was able to earn enough by teaching, Chopin preferred composition to playing concerts. His musical tastes were public knowledge. Friendly with Hector Berlioz (1803-1869) and Mendelssohn, he was not impressed with their music. Nor, for that matter, did he appreciate Robert Schumann's (1810-1856) work, despite Schumann's warm welcome written for the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik when Chopin first arrived in Paris. Schumann introduced Clara Wieck to Chopin's work, and eventually her performances of Chopin's pieces made favorable impressions on many audiences. Several young ladies appear to have been the object of Chopin's affections over the years, but the most celebrated female with whom he had a relationship was Aurore Dudevant, known as George Sand, whom he met in 1836. For nine years, beginning in 1838, after he had composed the "Funeral March" (which later became part of the B-flat Minor Sonata), she was his closest associate. Despite failing health, the composer completed his twenty-four Preludes in Valldemosa, Majorca (one of the Balearic Islands in the western Mediterranean). In 1846 Sand's children became a problem. Chopin sided with Solange, Sand's daughter, in arguments against Sand and her son, Maurice. Separation became inevitable, and the beginning of the end for Chopin. His health failed, and he lost all interest in composition. Chopin then moved to England, where he gave several private performances in London and on May 15 played for Queen Victoria (1819-1901). After a rest in Scotland, he retu

Biography

  • CHOPIN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Polonesa-fantasía para piano solo en la bemol mayor op 61

    CLASS 7169: [O.V.: German]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 48''
    Parte - 16' 29''
    Parte - 11' 18''

DEBUSSY, Claude

Picture: DEBUSSY, Claude

St Germain-en-Laye, 1862 - Paris, 1918. Born in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France, Claude Debussy studied with Guiraud and others at the Paris Conservatoire (1872-84) and as an 1884 Prix de Rome winner, went to Rome, Italy, though more important impressions came from his visits to Bayreuth (1888, 1889) and from hearing Javanese gamelan music in Paris (1889). Wagner's influence is evident in the cantata La damoiselle élue (1888) and the Cinq poèmes de Baudelaire (1889) but other songs of the period, notably the settings of Verlaine (Ariettes oubliées, Trois mélodies, Fêtes galantes) are in a more capricious style, as are parts of the still somewhat Franckian G minor String Quartet (1893); in that work he used not only the Phrygian mode but also less standard modes, notably the whole-tone mode, to create the floating harmony he discovered through the work of contemporary writers: Mallarmé in the orchestral Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune (1894 - in 1912 used as music for the L'Après-midi d'un Faune ballet production) and Maeterlinck in the opera Pelléas et Mélisande, dating in large part from 1893-5 but not completed until 1902. These works also brought forward a fluidity of rhythm and color quite new to Western music. Pelléas, with its rule of understatement and deceptively simple declamation, also brought an entirely new tone to opera &#151; but an unrepeatable one. Debussy worked on other opera projects and left substantial sketches for two pieces after tales by Edgar Allan Poe (Le diable dans le beffroi and La chute de la maison Usher), but neither was completed. Instead, the main works were orchestral pieces, piano sets, and songs. Among his major orchestral works are the three Nocturnes (1899), characteristic studies of veiled harmony and texture ('Nuages'), exuberant cross-cutting ('Fêtes') and seductive whole-tone drift ('Sirènes'). La mer (1905) essays a more symphonic form, with a finale that works themes from the first movement, though the centerpiece (Jeux de vagues) proceeds much less directly and with more variety of color. The three Images (1912) are more loosely linked, and the biggest, Ibéria is itself a triptych, a medley of Spanish allusions. Finally, the ballet Jeux (1913) contains some of Debussy's strangest harmony and texture in a form that moves freely over its own field of motivic connection. Other late stage works, including the ballets Khamma (1912) and La boîte à joujoux (1913) and the mystery play Le martyre de St. Sébastien (1911), were not completely orchestrated by Debussy, though St. Sébastien is remarkable in sustaining an antique modal atmosphere that otherwise was touched only in relatively short piano pieces (eg. La cathédrale engloutie). Debussy wrote much piano music although the most important of them to begin with are works which, Verlaine fashion, look back at rococo decorousness with a modern cynicism and puzzlement (Suite bergamasque, 1890; Pour le piano, 1901). His first volume of Images pour piano 1904 - 1905 evokes tonality that was rarely heard in works by his contemporaries such as phrases suggesting the rippling of water in the first piece Reflets dans l'eau as well as a homage to Jean-Philippe Rameau's influence in a slow and mysterious court dance in the second piece Hommage à Rameau. But then, as in the orchestral pieces, Debussy began to associate his music with visual impressions of the East, Spain, landscapes etc, in a sequence of sets of short pieces. This can be heard in the volume of pieces known as

Biography

  • DEBUSSY | Bashkirov < Piano

    Preludios para piano solo (Libro I)

    7. Ce qu'a vu le vent d'ouest

    CLASS 3771: [O.V.: English-Russian-French]

    Content

    Parte - 20' 53''
  • DEBUSSY | Bashkirov < Piano

    Preludios para piano solo (Libro I)

    9. La sérénade interrompue

    CLASS 3771: [O.V.: English-Russian-French]

    Content

    Parte - 12' 07''

LISZT, Franz

Picture: LISZT, Franz

Raiding (Doborján), 1811 - Bayreuth, 1886. Hungarian composer, pianist and teacher. He was one of the leaders of the Romantic movement in music. In his compositions he developed new methods, both imaginative and technical, which left their mark upon his forward-looking contemporaries and anticipated some 20th-century ideas and procedures; he also evolved the method of 'transformation of themes' as part of his revolution in form, made radical experiments in harmony and invented the symphonic poem for orchestra. As the greatest piano virtuoso of his time, he used his sensational technique and captivating concert personality not only for personal effect but to spread, through his transcriptions, knowledge of other composers' music. As a conductor and teacher, especially at Weimar, he made himself the most influential figure of the New German School dedicated to progress in music. His unremitting championship of Wagner and Berlioz helped these composers achieve a wider European fame. Equally important was his unrivalled commitment to preserving and promoting the best of the past, including Bach, Handel, Schubert, Weber and above all Beethoven; his performances of such works as Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and Hammerklavier Sonata created new audiences for music hitherto regarded as incomprehensible. The seeming contradictions in his personal life a strong religious impulse mingled with a love of worldly sensation were resolved by him with difficulty. Yet the vast amount of new biographical information makes the unthinking view of him as 'half gypsy, half priest' impossible to sustain. He contained in his character more of the ideals and aspirations of the 19th century than any other major musician.

Biography

  • LISZT | Bashkirov < Piano

    Années de pèlerinage, deuxième année, Italie (Años de peregrinación, segundo año, Italia) para piano solo S 161

    7. Après une lecture du Dante, fantasia quasi sonata

    CLASS 3770: [O.V.: Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 55' 31''
  • LISZT | Bashkirov < Piano

    Fantasie über Motive aus Figaro und Don Juan (Fantasía sobre motivos de Fígaro y Don Juan) para piano S 697

    CLASS 7211: [O.V.: English-Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 34' 50''
    Parte - 5' 29''
  • LISZT | Bashkirov < Piano

    Fantasie über Motive aus Figaro und Don Juan (Fantasía sobre motivos de Fígaro y Don Juan) para piano S 697

    CLASS 7214: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 40' 27''
    Parte - 21' 32''

MENDELSSOHN, Felix

Picture: MENDELSSOHN, Felix

Hamburg, 1809 - Leipzig, 1847. Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born, and generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period. The grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, he was born into a notable Jewish family, although he himself was brought up initially without religion, and later as a Lutheran Christian. He was recognized early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalise on his abilities. Indeed his father was disinclined to allow Felix to follow a musical career until it became clear that he intended seriously to dedicate himself to it. Early success in Germany was followed by travel throughout Europe; Mendelssohn was particularly well received in Britain as a composer, conductor and soloist, and his ten visits there (during which many of his major works were premiered) form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes however set him apart from many of his more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Liszt, Wagner and Berlioz. The Conservatory he founded at Leipzig became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook. Mendelssohn's work includes symphonies, concerti, oratorios, piano and chamber music. He also had an important role in the revival of interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality is now being recognized and re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the Romantic era.

Biography

  • MENDELSSOHN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Concierto para piano y orquesta núm. 2 en re menor op 40 (parte de orquesta reducida para piano)

    II. Adagio - Molto sostenuto

    CLASS 1390: [O.V.: English-Russian-French]

    Content

    Parte - 24' 29''
  • MENDELSSOHN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Concierto para piano y orquesta núm. 2 en re menor op 40 (parte de orquesta reducida para piano)

    III. Finale. Presto scherzando

    CLASS 1390: [O.V.: English-Russian-French]

    Content

    Parte - 29' 33''

PROKOFIEV, Sergey

Picture: PROKOFIEV, Sergey

Sontsovka, 1891 - Moscow, 1953. One of the most prolific and celebrated Russian composers of the 20th century, Sergei Prokofiev is perhaps most famous for music he composed for the children's story Peter and the Wolf. He proved his talent as a pianist and composer at a very early age, and in 1904 moved with his mother to St. Petersburg, where he studied at the St. Petersburg Conservatory. As a young man he traveled to England and Europe on tour, and in 1918 he left Russia for the United States. During the 1920s he toured New York, Chicago, London and Paris, gaining popularity with audiences, if not with critics. In 1927 he returned to perform in the Soviet Union and was greeted as a national hero. In the early 1930s he travelled between Paris and Moscow, finally settling in Moscow in 1936. A few years later, World War II marked the beginning of Prokofiev's rocky relationship with the Soviet government of Joseph Stalin. Although he continued to be a productive composer, in the late 1940s Prokofiev fell out of favor with government officials and spent his last years in failing health and financial insecurity. His works include the ballets Chout and The Love for Three Oranges, operas such as The Fiery Angel and War and Peace (based on the novel by Leo Tolstoy) and music for the Sergei Eisenstein films Alexander Nevsky (1938) and Ivan the Terrible (1942-46). Modern audiences know Prokofiev's work primarily through the many symphonic suites he composed based on his stage and film work. His birthdate is sometimes given as 11 April 1891, the date based on the Julian calendar prior to the Soviet Union adopting the Gregorian calendar. Prokofiev died on the same day as Stalin.

Biography

SCHUBERT, Franz

Picture: SCHUBERT, Franz

Vienna, 1797 - Vienna, 1828. Franz Peter Schubert was among the first of the Romantics, and the composer who, more than any other, brought the art song (lied) to artistic maturity. During his short but prolific career, he produced masterpieces in nearly every genre, all characterized by rich harmonies, an expansive treatment of classical forms, and a seemingly endless gift for melody. Schubert began his earliest musical training studying with his father and brothers. Having passed an audition, Schubert enrolled at the Convict school that trained young vocalists to eventually sing at the chapel of The Imperial Court. Schubert began to explore composition and wrote a song that came to the attention of the institution's director, Antonio Salieri, who along with the school's professor of harmony, hailed young Schubert as a genius. In 1813, after Schubert's voice broke, he returned to live with his father, who directed him to follow in his footsteps and become a schoolteacher. Schubert begrudgingly complied and worked miserably in that capacity by day, while composing prolifically by night. He had written more than 100 songs as well as numerous symphonic, operatic, and chamber music scores, before he reached the age of 20. Schubert finally left his teaching position to dedicate himself completely to musical pursuits. During the summer of 1818, the young composer worked as a private music teacher to the aristocratic Esterházy family. When he left that post in the fall, Schubert lived a somewhat bohemian lifestyle, composing and spending time with a group of friends that acted as his personal support system. In 1820, Schubert was commissioned by two opera houses, the Karthnerthor Theatre and Theatre-an-der-Wein, to compose a pair of operas. He wrote Zwillingsbruden, and Zauberharfe, both of which were unenthusiastically received. Schubert failed to secure a contract with a publisher, as none were willing to take a chance on a relatively unknown composer who wrote (harmonically) untraditional music. Schubert, along with the support of his artistic friends, published his own work for a collection of roughly 100 subscribers. These efforts, however, were financially unrewarding, and Schubert struggled to sustain himself. His work garnered little attention and contemporary composers dismissed his music as presumptuous and immature. In 1823, Schubert was elected to the Musikverein of Graz, as an honorary member. Though this brought no financial reward and was an inconsequential appointment, Schubert relished its slight recognition, and to show his gratitude, composed his famous Unfinished Symphony. Five years later, Schubert's music was featured at a concert at Vienna's Musikverein. His work was received quite enthusiastically, and to much critical acclaim. This marked the only time during the composer's life that he enjoyed such success. This seemed to provide Schubert with a renewed sense of optimism, and despite illness, the composer continued to produce at an incredible rate. He began to organize a scheme to increase his artistic popularity, by continuing to evaluate his work and progress as a musician, perhaps even planning to study harmony privately. Schubert's health did not improve, and he soon found himself at death's door. During the composer's last moments, he instructed his brother Ferdinand to ensure that he would be buried alongside Ludwig van Beethoven's grave. Schubert revered the legendary composer, and was grateful to him, as Beethoven had praised his wo

Biography

  • SCHUBERT | Bashkirov < Piano

    3 Klavierstücke (Piezas para piano) D 946

    I. Allegro assai, in E flat minor

    CLASS 3731: [O.V.: German]

    Content

    Parte - 7' 54''
    Parte - 14' 31''
  • SCHUBERT | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano en do menor D 958

    IV. Allegro

    CLASS 7209: [O.V.: English-Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 52''
    Parte - 18' 43''
    Parte - 20' 25''

SCHUMANN, Robert

Picture: SCHUMANN, Robert

Zwichau, 1810 - Endenich, 1856. Robert Schumann was born 8 June, 1810 in Zwickau, Germany. He was the son of a book publisher and writer. As a child, Robert Schumann showed early abilities in both music and literature, but was not considered a prodigy by any means. At sixteen, after the tragic deaths of his sister and father, he was sent to the University of Leipzig at his mother's insistence. He studied law there until he was able to convince his mother of his need to study music. In Leipzig, from 1830, he worked under the renowned piano teacher Friedrich Wieck, whose favourite daughter, Clara, was already a well-known piano prodigy. It is thought that Schumann and Clara were lovers by 1835. His own ambitions as a pianist were hampered by a weakness in the fingers of one hand (possibly caused by they syphilis that would later claim his sanity), but the 1830s nevertheless brought a number of marvellous compositions for the instrument. Robert Schumann's work is noted for its links to literature. Many of his compositions allude to characters or scenes from poems, novels, and plays; others are like musical crossword puzzles with key signatures or musical themes that refer to people or places important to him. This intimate relationship with the written word gives his music an extra dimension. At the same time, its sheer joyfulness ranks it among the best loved music of the age. Schumann was not only interested in literature, he was also a working journalist who edited his own influential musical magazine, the Neue Zeitsfchrift fur Musik. This put Schumann in a unique position: his music was often inspired by the world of words, while his work as writer and critic kept him in touch with the Romantic musical scene at large. Through his music journal he helped to bring the young Chopin and, later, the young Brahms to the attention of the German-speaking public. Schumann's courtship of and marriage to Clara Wieck is one of the most famous romances in music history. Clara's father was one of Schumann's piano teachers. He predicted a great future for his pupil, but he fiercely opposed the young man's request to marry his daughter. He not only disapproved of Schumann's drinking, he also wanted Clara to become a famous pianist in her own right. For years Friedrich did everything he could to keep Schumann and Clara apart. Schumann eventually took Wieck to court and obtained permission to marry her, but it had been a long and bitter struggle. Overall, Robert Schumann's early piano compositions, many of which were played by his wife Clara, are the most original and daring of his works. As a composer, he tended to concentrate on one type of music at a time. For instance, his songs qualify him as a worthy successor to Schubert. And while his great orchestral works remain closer to the traditional Classical forms of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, he is regarded as a talented, but not masterful. Nor was he successful as a composer of operas. It is in his piano music and his songs - Carnival ("Dainty Scenes on Four Notes") in particular - that he accomplished his greatest work. In 1850 Schumann was appointed Music Director to the city of Dusseldorf, where he enjoyed no great success. Suffering from hallucinations and rapidly declining mental facilities, he resigned in 1853. Mounting fears of insanity plunged Schumann into a serious mental break-down, and in 1854 he attempted suicide by throwing himself into the Rhine. He was then confined to an asylum at Endenich,

Biography

  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Thème sur le nom Abegg varié pour le pianoforte (Tema sobre el nombre Abegg variado para el piano) para piano solo op 1

    Variation 1

    CLASS 7168: [O.V.: Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 6' 16''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Thème sur le nom Abegg varié pour le pianoforte (Tema sobre el nombre Abegg variado para el piano) para piano solo op 1

    Variation 2

    CLASS 7168: [O.V.: Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 6' 42''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Thème sur le nom Abegg varié pour le pianoforte (Tema sobre el nombre Abegg variado para el piano) para piano solo op 1

    Variation 3

    CLASS 7168: [O.V.: Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 13' 35''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Thème sur le nom Abegg varié pour le pianoforte (Tema sobre el nombre Abegg variado para el piano) para piano solo op 1

    Finale

    CLASS 7168: [O.V.: Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 21' 44''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Sonata para piano solo núm. 1 en fa sostenido menor op 11

    III. Scherzo ed Intermezzo

    CLASS 3734: [O.V.: German]

    Content

    Parte - 19' 03''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    1. Nicht schnell, mit Innigkeit (from Drei Stücklein)

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 37''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    2. Sehr rasch (from Drei Stücklein)

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 49''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    3. Frisch (from Drei Stücklein)

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 3' 16''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    4. Ziemlich langsam (from Albumblätter)

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 32''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    5. Schnell (from Albumblätter)

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 4' 01''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    6. Ziemlich langsam, sehr gesangvoll (from Albumblätter)

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 31''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    7. Sehr langsam (from Albumblätter)

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 4' 34''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    9. Novellette

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 5' 09''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    12. Abendmusik

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 9' 43''
  • SCHUMANN | Bashkirov < Piano

    Bunte Blätter (Hojas multicolores) para piano solo op 99

    14. Geschwindmarsch

    CLASS 7182: [O.V.: Russian-Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 46''

TCHAIKOVSKY, Pyotr Il'yich

Picture: TCHAIKOVSKY, Pyotr Il'yich

Kamsko-Votkinsk, 1840 - St Petersburg, 1893. He was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. His wide ranging output includes symphonies, operas, ballets, instrumental and chamber music and songs. He wrote some of the most popular concert and theatrical music in the classical repertoire, including the ballets Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, the 1812 Overture, his First Piano Concerto, his last three numbered symphonies, and the opera Eugene Onegin. Born into a middle-class family, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant, despite his obvious musical precocity. He pursued a musical career against the wishes of his family, entering the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1862 and graduating in 1865. This formal, Western-oriented training set him apart from the contemporary nationalistic movement embodied by the influential group of young Russian composers known as The Five, with whom Tchaikovsky's professional relationship was mixed. Although he enjoyed many popular successes, Tchaikovsky was never emotionally secure, and his life was punctuated by personal crises and periods of depression. Contributory factors were his suppressed homosexuality and fear of exposure, his disastrous marriage, and the sudden collapse of the one enduring relationship of his adult life, his 13-year association with the wealthy widow Nadezhda von Meck. Amid private turmoil Tchaikovsky's public reputation grew; he was honored by the Tsar, awarded a lifetime pension and lauded in the concert halls of the world. His sudden death at the age of 53 is generally ascribed to cholera, but some attribute it to suicide. Although perennially popular with concert audiences across the world, Tchaikovsky's music was often dismissed by critics in the early and mid-20th century as being vulgar and lacking in elevated thought. By the end of the 20th century, however, Tchaikovsky's status as a significant composer was generally regarded as secure.

Biography

  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Bashkirov < Piano

    Obertura de Romeo y Julieta para orquesta en si menor (transcripción para piano de F. Noak)

    CLASS 1383: [O.V.: Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 26' 15''
    Parte - 2' 58''
  • TCHAIKOVSKY | Bashkirov < Piano

    Obertura de Romeo y Julieta para orquesta en si menor (transcripción para piano de F. Noak)

    CLASS 1396: [O.V.: Russian]

    Content

    Parte - 18' 01''
    Parte - 11' 50''
    Parte - 24' 44''

Bennett, William

Picture: Bennett, William

London, 1936. One of the foremost musical artists performing today, William Bennett has raised the profile of the flute to that of an instrument capable of a wide range of tonal colours, dynamics, and expression, giving it the depth, dignity, and grandeur of the voice or a string instrument. He studied in London with Geoffrey Gilbert, and in France with Jean-Pierre Rampal and Marcel Moyse. He has been principal flute in many orchestras including the London Symphony, the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, and the English Chamber Orchestra. The Master classes of Marcel Moyse in Switzerland in the late 70's provided extra stimulus and inspiration so that, in tandem with William Bennett's burgeoning career developed as an International soloist and recording artist Partnerships with Clifford Benson (piano) and George Malcolm (harpsichord) and solo recordings mth Yehudi Menuhin, the Grumiaux Trio, I Musici, the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, and the English Chamber Orchestra have received international acclaim and enthusiastic reviews in record and CD journals. Early in his career he made the first English recording of the complete Handel Flute Sonatas, and of contemporary works including the Sonatine of Boulez, Berio's Sequenza, Messaien's Merle Noir, and Richard Rodney Bennett's "Winter Music" (written for him). In addition to recording the standard flute repertoire of Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, Mozart, etc., he has made pioneer recordings of many neglected 19th century works, such as music by Ries, Romberg, and Taffanel. He has recorded with artists such as Jimi Hendrix and Wynton Marsalis. He has made over 90 CD's as a soloist. Recently he premiered the Concerto by William Mathias, the Concerto by Diana Burr ell and the Concerto for Flute and Flute Orchestra by Venezuelan composer Raymund Pineda. All of these were specially written for him. This year his Concert engagement take him to U.S.A (February, May, June), Switzerland, Japan, Venezuela. China/Taiwan etc. and he is going to record several contemporary Flute Concertos with English Chamber Orchestra and two CDs with pianist Clifford Benson. In January 1995 H.M. the Queen presented William Bennett with the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (O.B.E) for his distinguished Services to Music. In 2002 he was awarded the National Flute Association's "Lifetime Achievement Award" and in 2003 he was appointed the British Flute Society's "Flautist Laureate".

Biography

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Bennett < Flauta

    Fidelio oder Die eheliche Liebe (Fidelio o El amor conyugal) op 72 (parte de flauta)

    Obertura Leonore núm. 3

    CLASS 4986: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 16' 08''

FELD, Jindrich

Picture: FELD, Jindrich

No translation available

Biography

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

GLUCK, Christoph Wilibald

Picture: GLUCK, Christoph Wilibald

Erasbach, 1714 - Vienna, 1787

Biography

  • GLUCK | Bennett < Flauta

    Orfeo ed Euridice (Orfeo y Eurídice) (parte de flauta)

    "Danza degli spiriti beati"

    CLASS 4986: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 24' 13''

IBERT, Jacques

Picture: IBERT, Jacques

Paris - Paris

Biography

  • IBERT | Bennett < Flauta

    Pièce (Pieza) para flauta sola

    CLASS 5020: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 15' 19''
    Parte - 14' 58''
    Parte - 18' 30''
    Parte - 21' 48''

RAVEL, Maurice

Picture: RAVEL, Maurice

Ciboure, Basses Pyrénées, 1875 - Paris, 1937. Maurice Ravel was among the most significant and influential composers of the early twentieth century. Although he is frequently linked with Claude Debussy as an exemplar of musical impressionism, and some of their works have a surface resemblance, Ravel possessed an independent voice that grew out of his love of a broad variety of styles, including the French Baroque, Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Spanish folk traditions, and American jazz and blues. His elegant and lyrically generous body of work was not large in comparison with that of some of his contemporaries, but his compositions are notable for being meticulously and exquisitely crafted. He was especially gifted as an orchestrator, an area in which he remains unsurpassed. Ravel's mother was of Basque heritage, a fact that accounted for his lifelong fascination with Spanish music, and his father was a Swiss inventor and engineer, most likely the source of his commitment to precision and craftsmanship. At the age of 14, he entered the Paris Conservatory, where he was a student from 1889 to 1895 and from 1897 to 1903. His primary composition teacher was Gabriel Fauré. A major disappointment of his life was his failure to win the Prix de Rome in spite of numerous attempts. The difficulty was transparently the conflict between the conservative administration of the Conservatory and Ravel's independent thinking, meaning his association with the French avant-garde (Debussy), and his interest in non-French traditions (Wagner, the Russian nationalists, Balinese gamelan). He had already established himself as a composer of prominence with works such as his String Quartet, and the piano pieces Pavane pour une infante défunte, Jeux d'eaux, and the Sonatine, and his loss of the Prix de Rome in 1905 was considered such a scandal that the director of the Conservatory was forced to resign. Ravel continued to express admiration for Debussy's music throughout his life, but as his own reputation grew stronger during the first decade of the century, a mutual professional jealousy cooled their personal relationship. Around the same time, he developed a friendship with Igor Stravinsky. The two worked collaboratively on arrangements for Sergey Diaghilev and became familiar with each other's work during Stravinsky's time in Paris. Between 1909 and 1912, Ravel composed Daphnis et Chloé for Diaghilev and Les Ballets Russes. It was the composer's largest and most ambitious work and is widely considered his masterpiece. He wrote a second ballet for Diaghilev, La Valse, which the impresario rejected, but which went on to become one of his most popular orchestral works. Following his service in the First World War as an ambulance driver, and the death of his mother in 1917, his output was temporarily diminished. In 1925, the Monte Carlo Opera presented the premiere of another large work, the 'lyric fantasy' L'enfant et les sortilèges, a collaboration with writer Colette. American jazz and blues became increasingly intriguing to the composer. In 1928 he made a hugely successful tour of North America, where he met George Gershwin and had the opportunity to broaden his exposure to jazz. Several of his most important late works, such as the Sonata for Violin and Piano and the Piano Concerto in G show the influence of that interest. Ironically, Ravel, who in his youth was rejected by some elements of the French musical establishment for being a modernist, in his later years was scorned by Satie and the

Biography

  • RAVEL | Bennett < Flauta

    Daphnis et Chloé, suite núm. 2 (Fragmentos sinfónicos II) para orquesta (parte de flauta)

    Pantomime (troisième tableau)

    CLASS 4986: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 15' 22''

SAINT-SAËNS, Camille

Picture: SAINT-SAËNS, Camille

Paris, 1835 - Algiers, 1921. Camille Saint-Saëns was something of an anomaly among French composers of the nineteenth century in that he wrote in virtually all genres, including opera, symphonies, concertos, songs, sacred and secular choral music, solo piano, and chamber music. He was generally not a pioneer, though he did help to revive some earlier and largely forgotten dance forms, like the bourée and gavotte. He was a conservative who wrote many popular scores scattered throughout the various genres: the Piano Concerto No. 2, Symphony No. 3 ("Organ"), the symphonic poem Danse macabre, the opera Samson et Dalila, and probably his most widely performed work, The Carnival of The Animals. While he remained a composer closely tied to tradition and traditional forms in his later years, he did develop a more arid style, less colorful and, in the end, less appealing. He was also a poet and playwright of some distinction. Saint-Saëns was born in Paris on October 9, 1835. He was one of the most precocious musicians ever, beginning piano lessons with his aunt at two-and-a-half and composing his first work at three. At age seven he studied composition with Pierre Maledin. When he was ten, he gave a concert that included Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto, Mozart's B flat Concerto, K. 460, along with works by Bach, Handel, and Hummel. In his academic studies, he displayed the same genius, learning languages and advanced mathematics with ease and celerity. He would also develop keen, lifelong interests in geology and astronomy. In 1848, he entered the Paris Conservatory and studied organ and composition, the latter with Halévy. By his early 20s, following the composition of two symphonies, he had won the admiration and support of Berlioz, Liszt, Gounod, Rossini, and other notable figures. From 1853 to 1876, he held church organist posts; he also taught at the École Niedermeyer (1861-65). He composed much throughout his early years, turning out the 1853 Symphony in F ("Urbs Roma"), a Mass (1855) and several concertos, including the popular second, for piano (1868). In 1875, Saint-Saëns married the nineteen-year-old Marie Truffot, bringing on perhaps the saddest chapter in his life. The union produced two children who died within six weeks of each other, one from a four-story fall. The marriage ended in 1881. Oddly, this dark period in his life produced some of his most popular works, including Danse macabre (1875) and Samson et Dalila (1878). After the tragic events of his marriage, Saint-Saëns developed a fondness for Fauré and his family, acting as a second father to his children. But he also remained very close to his mother, who had opposed his marriage. When she died in 1888, the composer fell into a deep depression, even contemplating suicide for a time. He did much travel in the years that followed and developed an interest in Algeria and Egypt, which eventually inspired him to write Africa (1891) and his Piano Concerto No. 5, the "Egyptian." He also turned out works unrelated to exotic places, such as his popular and most enduring serious composition, the Symphony No. 3. Curiously, after 1890, Saint-Saëns' music was regarded with some condescension in his homeland, while in England and the United States he was hailed as France's greatest living composer well into the twentieth century. Saint-Saëns experienced an especially triumphant concert tour when he visited the U.S. in 1915. In the last two decades of his life, he remained attached to his dogs and was

Biography

  • SAINT-SAËNS | Bennett < Flauta

    Le carnaval des animaux (El carnaval de los animales) para 11 instrumentos (parte de flauta)

    10. Volières

    CLASS 4986: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 7' 44''

SCHUBERT, Franz

Picture: SCHUBERT, Franz

Vienna, 1797 - Vienna, 1828. Franz Peter Schubert was among the first of the Romantics, and the composer who, more than any other, brought the art song (lied) to artistic maturity. During his short but prolific career, he produced masterpieces in nearly every genre, all characterized by rich harmonies, an expansive treatment of classical forms, and a seemingly endless gift for melody. Schubert began his earliest musical training studying with his father and brothers. Having passed an audition, Schubert enrolled at the Convict school that trained young vocalists to eventually sing at the chapel of The Imperial Court. Schubert began to explore composition and wrote a song that came to the attention of the institution's director, Antonio Salieri, who along with the school's professor of harmony, hailed young Schubert as a genius. In 1813, after Schubert's voice broke, he returned to live with his father, who directed him to follow in his footsteps and become a schoolteacher. Schubert begrudgingly complied and worked miserably in that capacity by day, while composing prolifically by night. He had written more than 100 songs as well as numerous symphonic, operatic, and chamber music scores, before he reached the age of 20. Schubert finally left his teaching position to dedicate himself completely to musical pursuits. During the summer of 1818, the young composer worked as a private music teacher to the aristocratic Esterházy family. When he left that post in the fall, Schubert lived a somewhat bohemian lifestyle, composing and spending time with a group of friends that acted as his personal support system. In 1820, Schubert was commissioned by two opera houses, the Karthnerthor Theatre and Theatre-an-der-Wein, to compose a pair of operas. He wrote Zwillingsbruden, and Zauberharfe, both of which were unenthusiastically received. Schubert failed to secure a contract with a publisher, as none were willing to take a chance on a relatively unknown composer who wrote (harmonically) untraditional music. Schubert, along with the support of his artistic friends, published his own work for a collection of roughly 100 subscribers. These efforts, however, were financially unrewarding, and Schubert struggled to sustain himself. His work garnered little attention and contemporary composers dismissed his music as presumptuous and immature. In 1823, Schubert was elected to the Musikverein of Graz, as an honorary member. Though this brought no financial reward and was an inconsequential appointment, Schubert relished its slight recognition, and to show his gratitude, composed his famous Unfinished Symphony. Five years later, Schubert's music was featured at a concert at Vienna's Musikverein. His work was received quite enthusiastically, and to much critical acclaim. This marked the only time during the composer's life that he enjoyed such success. This seemed to provide Schubert with a renewed sense of optimism, and despite illness, the composer continued to produce at an incredible rate. He began to organize a scheme to increase his artistic popularity, by continuing to evaluate his work and progress as a musician, perhaps even planning to study harmony privately. Schubert's health did not improve, and he soon found himself at death's door. During the composer's last moments, he instructed his brother Ferdinand to ensure that he would be buried alongside Ludwig van Beethoven's grave. Schubert revered the legendary composer, and was grateful to him, as Beethoven had praised his wo

Biography

  • SCHUBERT | Bennett < Flauta

    Introducción y variaciones (sobre Trockne Blumen de "Die schöne Müllerin") para flauta y piano D 802 op 160

    Introduktion. Andante

    CLASS 4966: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 59''
    Parte - 23' 34''
  • SCHUBERT | Bennett < Flauta

    Introducción y variaciones (sobre Trockne Blumen de "Die schöne Müllerin") para flauta y piano D 802 op 160

    Thema. Andantino

    CLASS 4966: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 8' 20''
    Parte - 22' 26''

STRAVINSKY, Igor

Picture: STRAVINSKY, Igor

Oranienbaum, nr St Petersburg, 1882 - New York, 1971. Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. He is widely acknowledged as one of the most important and influential composers of 20th century music. He was a quintessentially cosmopolitan Russian who was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people of the century. He became a naturalized US citizen in 1946. In addition to the recognition he received for his compositions, he also achieved fame as a pianist and a conductor, often at the premieres of his works. Stravinsky's compositional career was notable for its stylistic diversity. He first achieved international fame with three ballets commissioned by the impresario Sergei Diaghilev and performed by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes (Russian Ballets): The Firebird (1910), Petrushka (1911/1947), and The Rite of Spring (1913). The Rite, whose premiere provoked a riot, transformed the way in which subsequent composers thought about rhythmic structure, and was largely responsible for Stravinsky's enduring reputation as a musical revolutionary, pushing the boundaries of musical design. After this first Russian phase Stravinsky turned to neoclassicism in the 1920s. The works from this period tended to make use of traditional musical forms (concerto grosso, fugue, symphony), frequently concealed a vein of intense emotion beneath a surface appearance of detachment or austerity, and often paid tribute to the music of earlier masters, for example J.S. Bach and Tchaikovsky. In the 1950s he adopted serial procedures, using the new techniques over his last twenty years. Stravinsky's compositions of this period share traits with examples of his earlier output: rhythmic energy, the construction of extended melodic ideas out of a few two- or three-note cells, and clarity of form, of instrumentation, and of utterance. He also published a number of books throughout his career, almost always with the aid of a collaborator, sometimes uncredited. In his 1936 autobiography, Chronicles of My Life, written with the help of Walter Nouvel, Stravinsky included his infamous statement that "music is, by its very nature, essentially powerless to express anything at all." With Alexis Roland-Manuel and Pierre Souvtchinsky he wrote his 1939&#150;40 Harvard University Charles Eliot Norton Lectures, which were delivered in French and later collected under the title Poétique musicale in 1942 (translated in 1947 as Poetics of Music). Several interviews in which the composer spoke to Robert Craft were published as Conversations with Igor Stravinsky. They collaborated on five further volumes over the following decade.

Biography

  • STRAVINSKY | Bennett < Flauta

    Petrushka para orquesta (parte de flauta)

    Fête populaire de la Semaine Grasse (premier tableau)

    CLASS 4986: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 1' 54''
  • STRAVINSKY | Bennett < Flauta

    Petrushka para orquesta (parte de flauta)

    La Barque du Charlatan (premier tableau)

    CLASS 4986: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 22''
  • STRAVINSKY | Bennett < Flauta

    Petrushka para orquesta (parte de flauta)

    La ballerina et le Maure (troisième tableau)

    CLASS 4986: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 2' 39''

TAFFANEL, Paul

Picture: TAFFANEL, Paul

Bordeaux, 1844 - Paris, 1908. French flautist and conductor. Taffanel was the founder of the modern French school of flute playing which has since been widely adopted throughout the world.

Biography

  • TAFFANEL | Bennett < Flauta

    Fantasía sobre Der Freischütz (El Cazador furtivo) de Weber para flauta y piano

    CLASS 4991: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 31' 36''
  • TAFFANEL | Bennett < Flauta

    Fantasía sobre Der Freischütz (El Cazador furtivo) de Weber para flauta y piano

    CLASS 5004: [O.V.: English]

    Content

    Parte - 1h 10' 44''
    Parte - 10' 08''

Berganza, Teresa

Picture: Berganza, Teresa

Madrid. The names of the most important international festivals and the most prestigious opera houses frame the profession of this mezzosoprano born in Madrid and whose performances of Monteverdi, Bach, Mozart, Haendel, Rossini, Purcell, Offenbach, Bizet or Massenet are considered historical references. Together with these authors, the names of the lieder repertoire find an exceptional vehicle in the voice of Teresa Berganza, performer without comparison of Schubert, Schumann, Mahler, Wolf, Richard Strauss, Fauré or Mussorgsky. Her refined technique and extraordinary diction allows her to confront the performance of french, german, italian, russian, brazilian or portuguese Songs, without forgetting the spanish repertoire (Falla, Turina, Granados). Musically educated at the Madrid Real Conservatory of Music, she studied voice in depth with Lola Rodriguez de Aragón (herself a student of Elisabeth Schumann and representative of the 'lieder' school in Spain). In her biographies, Teresa Berganza emphasizes the influence of her father in her artistic career. In the fifties, she begins her performances in Madrid and she participates in numerous zarzuela recordings with Ataúlfo Argenta. Since her debut at the 1957 Aix-en-Provence Festival, Berganza becomes a mythical performer for the mezzosoprano roles of the operas by Mozart and Rossini. Her international activity has made her to share the stage with artists as Maria Callas, Boris Christoff, Titto Gobbi, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Teresa Stich Randall and so outstanding conductors as Herbert von Karajan, George Solti, Claudius Abbado, Karl Böhm, Carlo Maria Giulini and Daniel Barenboim. Awarded by her performances and recordings many times (including the 'Great Prize of the Record' in 6 occasions), she is also Commandeur aux Arts et Lettres of France and she has been named 'Académica de Número' at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. Berganza was distinguished in 1982, by the King of Spain, with the Gold medal to the Merit of the Fine Arts. At the moment, she is Head Professor of the Alfredo Kraus Voice Chair, sponsored by the Fundación Ramon Areces at the Reina Sofía School of Music.

Biography

ALONSO, Francisco

Picture: ALONSO, Francisco

Granada, 1887 - Madrid, 1948

Biography

BACH, Johann Sebastian

Picture: BACH, Johann Sebastian

Eisenach, 1685 - Leipzig, 1750. Born into a musical family, Bach received his earliest instruction from his father. After his father's death in 1695, Bach moved to Ohrdruf, where he lived and studied organ with his older brother Johann Christoph. He also received an education at schools in Eisenach, Ohrdruf, and Lüneburg. Bach's first permanent positions were as organist in Arnstadt (1703-1707) and Mühlhausen (1707-1708). During these years, he performed, composed taught, and developed an interest in organ building. From 1708-1717 he was employed by Duke Wilhelm Ernst of Weimar, first as court organist, and after 1714, as concertmaster. During this period, he composed many of his best organ compositions; in his capacity as concertmaster, he was also expected to produce a cantata each month. In Weimar, Bach's style was influenced by his study of numerous Italian compositions (especially Vivaldi concertos). Bach's next position, as Music Director for the Prince Leopold of Cüthen (1717-1723), involved entirely different activities. Since the court chapel was Calvinist, there was no need for church compositions; Bach probably used the Cüthen organs only for teaching and practice. His new works were primarily for instrumental solo or ensemble, to be used as court entertainment or for instruction. Among the important compositions at Cüthen were the Brandenburg Concertos, the first volume of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (The Well-Tempered Clavier), the "French" and "English" Suites for harpsichord (although the "English" Suites may be from the Weimar period), and most of the sonatas and suites for other instruments. In 1723, Bach was appointed cantor at the St. Thomas Church and School, and Director of Music for Leipzig, positions which he retained for the rest of his career. His official duties included the responsibility of overseeing the music in the four principal churches of the city, and organizing other musical events sponsored by the municipal council. During his first six years in Leipzig (1723-1729), Bach's most impressive compositions were his sacred cantatas (four yearly cycles), and the St. John and St. Matthew Passions. Bach apparently gave virtuoso organ recitals in Leipzig and on various tours, although he had no official position as organist in Leipzig. In 1729-1737 and 1739-1741, he was director of the Leipzig Collegium Musicum, an organization which had been founded by Telemann in 1704. This group of professional musicians and university students performed weekly concerts (out-of-doors in the summer, and at Zimmerman's coffee-house in the winter). Although no specific programs for these concerts have survived, Bach apparently revived and many of his instrumental compositions from Cüthen, wrote new works (e.g., secular cantatas), and conducted pieces by other composers. During the 1730s, Bach renewed his interest in keyboard compositions, and prepared the first three volumes of his Clavier-Übung (Keyboard Practice) for publication (1731, 1735, 1739); the fourth volume appeared in 1741-1742. In the 1730s, he also showed considerable interest in the royal court at Dresden, and was named "Hofkomponist" (court-composer") in Dresden in 1736. During Bach's last decade (the 1740s), he completed or revised several large-scale projects which he had started earlier. The Well-Tempered Clavier, Vol. II; a manuscript collection of chorale preludes (known as the "Leipzig 18", comprising revisions of Weimar pieces), and the B minor Mass. Other new works showed

Biography

  • BACH | Berganza < Canto

    La pasión según San Mateo BWV 244 (reducción para voz y piano)

    "Erbarme dich mein Gott"

    CLASS 6457: [O.V.: English-Spanish-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 4' 42''

BARBIERI, Francisco Asenjo

Picture: BARBIERI, Francisco Asenjo

Madrid, 1823 - Madrid, 1894

Biography

  • BARBIERI | Berganza < Canto

    El barberillo de Lavapiés

    "Una mujer que quiere ver a un barbero"

    CLASS 1605: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Carácter, Pronunciación - 3' 57''
    Carácter - 1' 10''
    Pronunciación, Carácter - 2' 05''
    Pronunciación, Carácter - 1' 23''

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Picture: BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van

Bonn, 1770 - Vienna, 1827. He was born in the German town of Bonn on the 16th of December 1770. His grandfather Ludwig and his father Johann were both musicians. Johann was to act as little Ludwig's first music teacher, but Ludwig soon changed to the court organist C. G. Neefe. Passing eleven years of age, Ludwig deputized for Neefe, and at twelve had his first music published. He then stayed as Neefe's assistant until 1787, when at seventeen, he took off for Vienna. Even though Vienna was to be his home for the rest of his life, this first visit was short. On hearing that his mother was dying, he quickly returned to Bonn. Five years later he finally moved to Vienna to live and work. After arriving in 1792 he studied composition and counterpoint under Haydn, Schenk, Salieri and Albrechtsberger. At the same time, he tried to establish himself as pianist and composer. His good relations with the towns aristocracy soon led to a secured income. In 1809, with the sole condition that he stayed in Vienna, Prince Kinsky, Prince Lobkowitz and Archduke Rudolp even guaranteed Beethoven a yearly income. But going back to the years around 1800, which is traditionally called the early period, he was still trying to master the high classical style. This strive culminated in the second symphony from 1801-1802. This is also the time when the middle period starts. From now up until 1813, Beethoven develops and enhances the high classical style into a more dynamic and individualistic style. It is now that he writes symphonies Nr. 3 - 8, piano consert Nr. 5 and a lot of chamber music. But as he learns to control his craft and develop the music into new undiscovered grounds, he also suffers from reminders of the pains of real life. He has early in life discovered that his hearing wasn't what it should be, and the disorder gets worse as time goes by. It gets to the point where Beethoven is thinking of ending his life as he sees no way out of his despair. That fact is documented in the letter he wrote to his brothers in 1802, the so called "Heiligenstadt Testament". This hearing disorder seems to have affected his social life to a great extent. He became difficult to handle in social interactions and could suddenly burst into outbreaks of anger and show bad temper where he usually insulted someone. If that is the reason for his troubles with women, or if their is something traumatic hidden in his childhood, I don't know, but the fact is that he never got involved with a woman in a normal relation. Beethoven seems to have been attracted to women he couldn't get, or at least was hard to get. An example is Antoine Brentano, with whom he had a relationship, but who broke up with him to marry a friend. It is she who is known as the "immortal beloved" in letters addressed to her from Beethoven in 1812. Now came a couple of years without much creative work. Instead he was tormented by personal matters concerning his nephew of which he tried to gain custody when the brother died in 1815. But Beethoven didn't have the capacity of a domestic human being, and even though he did win the struggle for custody, Beethovens relation with the nephew was tense and burdensome and it reached the point where little Karl tried to take his own life in 1826. This is also the so called late period in Beethovens musical career. His music is described as less dramatic and more introvert, but also, I would like to add, more mature and secure. It has a flavour of the genius growing old and an obvi

Biography

  • BEETHOVEN | Berganza < Canto

    Sinfonía núm. 9 en re menor op 125

    IV. Finale. Presto

    CLASS 1906: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Carácter, Colocación de la voz - 1' 21''
    Colocación de la voz, Respiración - 2' 46''
    Agógica, Dinámica - 1' 39''
    Indicaciones de ejecución, Respiración - 4' 35''

BELLINI, Vincenzo

Picture: BELLINI, Vincenzo

Catania, 1801 - Puteaux, 1835

Biography

BIZET, Georges

Picture: BIZET, Georges

Paris, 1838 - Bougival, 1875. Georges Bizet's life was short and full of difficulties, a fact that seems at odds with the enduring success of his final work, Carmen. Bizet was born into a musical family, where he received a good early training that led to his entrance into the Paris Conservatory at the age of nine. Bizet did well in his studies, developing his skills as a pianist (he impressed Franz Liszt with his playing) and as a composer. At the age of seventeen he composed his Symphony in C, a meticulous and effervescent work that was never heard until 1935. His studies at the conservatory were capped in 1858 with his receipt of the Prix de Rome, which allowed Bizet three years of financial support to concentrate on composition. Bizet's years in Rome were not very productive, and resulted in few works -- only four of which survive. One, his opera Don Procopio, was not produced until 1906. Upon his return to Paris he turned down a teaching position at the conservatory, wishing instead to concentrate on his writing. He found moderate success in 1863 with his opera Les pêcheurs de perles, but his next work, La jolie fille de Perth, saw only eighteen performances. Bizet's final years were marked by more problems: ill health and forced service during the Franco-Prussian war took their toll on the composer. In 1875, he completed a work that should have been his great triumph and the beginning of an illustrious career, his opera Carmen. In this opera, Bizet shows both a sure dramatic hand and mastery of the musical demands of the genre. The story of Carmen, however, proved too much for the Parisian audience (especially in a theater designed to appeal to families). Set in Spain and dealing with the exotic culture of the Gypsies, the story presented Bizet with the opportunity to create a rich musical score full of foreign flavor then in vogue. But the plot's exploration of sexual desire, moral ambiguity and a brutal murder insured a brief and controversial run. Bitterly dejected by this supreme blow, Bizet's health deteriorated quickly, and less than three months later he died of a heart attack. Ironically, only five years later the work returned to the Parisian stage after a series of successes in Vienna, Brussels, London and New York. It has, from that time on, remained one of the best loved of all nineteenth century operas.

Biography

  • BIZET | Berganza < Canto

    Carmen

    II. Andante scherzoso quasi allegretto

    CLASS 1903: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Pronunciación, Articulación - 1' 12''
    Libertad o rigor métricos, Articulación - 1' 09''
    Libertad o rigor métricos, Carácter - 1' 02''
    Caracterización de personajes, Carácter - 1' 14''
    Acentos, Dinámica - 2' 45''
    Articulación - 1' 03''
    Libertad o rigor métricos, Gestos del cuerpo - 1' 14''

BOITO, Arrigo

Picture: BOITO, Arrigo

Padua, 1842 - Milan, 1918

Biography

  • BOITO | Berganza < Canto

    Mefistofele

    "Laltra notte in fondo al mare"

    CLASS 1791: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Colocación de la voz, Expresividad - 1' 17''
    Voz media, Colocación de la voz - 1' 49''
    Carácter, Colocación de la voz - 2' 57''
    Colocación de la voz, Fraseo - 1' 01''
    Carácter, Colocación de la voz - 4' 18''
    Agilidades - 1' 34''

CHAUSSON, Ernest

Picture: CHAUSSON, Ernest

Paris, 1855 - Limay, 1899

Biography

  • CHAUSSON | Berganza < Canto

    Siete melodías para voz y piano

    5. Sérénade italienne (P. Bourget)

    CLASS 6457: [O.V.: English-Spanish-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 7' 51''
  • CHAUSSON | Berganza < Canto

    Siete melodías para voz y piano

    7. Le colibri (C.M.R. Leconte de Lisle)

    CLASS 6457: [O.V.: English-Spanish-Italian]

    Content

    Parte - 11' 46''

CILEA, Francesco

Picture: CILEA, Francesco

Palmi, 1866 - Varazze, 1950

Biography

  • CILEA | Berganza < Canto

    Adriana Lecouvreur

    "Io son l'umile ancella"

    CLASS 1803: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Caracterización de personajes, Movimiento del cuerpo - 1' 06''
    Fraseo, Respiración - 1' 36''

DENZA, Luigi

Picture: DENZA, Luigi

Castellammare di Stabia, 1846 - London, 1922

Biography

DONIZETTI, Gaetano

Picture: DONIZETTI, Gaetano

Bergamo, 1797 - Bergamo, 1848. The youngest of three sons, Donizetti was born in 1797 in Bergamo's Borgo Canale quarter located just outside the city walls. His family was very poor with no tradition of music, his father being the caretaker of the town pawnshop. Nevertheless, Donizetti received some musical instruction from Johann Simon Mayr, a priest at Bergamo's principal church (and also himself a composer of successful operas). Donizetti was not especially successful as a choirboy, but in 1806 he was one of the first pupils to be enrolled at the Lezioni Caritatevoli school, founded by Johann Simon Mayr, in Bergamo through a full scholarship. He received detailed training in the arts of fugue and counterpoint, and it was here that he launched his operatic career. After some minor compositions under the commission of Paolo Zanca, Donizetti wrote his fourth opera, Zoraïda di Granata. This work impressed Domenico Barbaia, a prominent theatre manager, and Donizetti was offered a contract to compose in Naples. Writing in Rome and Milan in addition to Naples, Donizetti achieved some success (his 75 operas written in the space of just 12 years were usually popular successes, but the critics were often unimpressed), but was not well known internationally until 1830, when his Anna Bolena was premiered in Milan. He almost instantly became famous throughout Europe. L'elisir d'amore, a comedy produced in 1832, came soon after, and is deemed one of the masterpieces of the comic opera, as is his Don Pasquale, written in 1843. Shortly after L'elisir d'amore, Donizetti composed Lucia di Lammermoor, based on the Sir Walter Scott novel The Bride of Lammermoor. It became his most famous opera, and one of the high points of the bel canto tradition, reaching stature similar to Bellini's Norma. After the success of Lucrezia Borgia (1833) consolidated his reputation, Donizetti followed the paths of both Rossini and Bellini by visiting Paris, but his opera Marino Falerio suffered by comparison with Bellini's I puritani, and he returned to Naples to produce his already-mentioned masterpiece, Lucia di Lammermoor. As Donizetti's fame grew, so did his engagements, as he was further hired to write in both France and Italy. In 1838, he moved to Paris after the Italian censor objected to the production of Poliuto (on the grounds that such a sacred subject was inappropriate for the stage); there he wrote La fille du régiment, which became another success. As a conductor, he led the premiere of Rossini's Stabat Mater. Donizetti's wife, Virginia Vasselli, gave birth to three children, none of whom survived. Within a year of his parents' deaths, his wife died from cholera. By 1843, Donizetti exhibited symptoms of syphilis. After being institutionalized in 1845, he was sent to Paris, where he could be cared for. After visits from friends, including Giuseppe Verdi, Donizetti was sent back to Bergamo, his hometown. After several years in the grip of insanity, he died in 1848 in the house of the noble family Scotti. After his death Donizetti was buried in the cemetery of Valtesse but in the late 19th century his body was transferred to Bergamo's Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore near the grave of his teacher Johann Simon Mayr. Donizetti is best known for his operatic works, but he also wrote music in a number of other forms, including some church music, a number of string quartets, and some orchestral works.

Biography

  • DONIZETTI | Berganza < Canto

    La favorite (La favorita)

    "Spirito gentil"

    CLASS 2815: [O.V.: Spanish]

    Content

    Parte - 6' 52''
    Agudos, Expresividad - 2' 54''
    Épocas y estilos, Agudos - 1' 09''

FALLA, Manuel de

Picture: FALLA, Manuel de

Cádiz, 1876 - Alta Gracia, 1946. Spanish composer, born in Cádiz in 1876. Together with Catalonian Isaac Albéniz and Enrique Granados, is the third of the names that make up the great triad of Spanish nationalistic music. He was also among the first composers in this tradition who, with a distinctive Spanish style, and yet devoid of any clichés, found the way to be popular throughout Europe and America, and by doing so overcame the isolation and subordination to other traditions to which Spanish music seemed to be doomed since the eighteenth century. He was never a prolific composer but his creations, all of a high degree of perfection, enjoy a privileged position within the repertoire. He received his first music lessons from his mother, an excelent pianist who noticed her son's undeniable gift and entrusted his education to the best teachers. After studying harmony, counterpoint and composition in his hometown with Alejandro Odero and Enrique Broca, De Falla went to the Madrid Conservatory where he studied with José Tragó and Felip Pedrell. The latter's influence was decisive in the conformation of his aesthetics: it was he who introduced him to the study of Spanish autochtonous music, so important in Falla's works of maturity. After a few zarzuelas, nowadays lost or forgotten like 'Los amores de Inés', the years of study in Madrid culminated in the composition of the opera 'La vida breve', which won the First Prize at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando composition contest . Even though the rules stated that the winning work was to be performed at Madrid's Teatro Real, the premiere did not take place until eight years later, not in Madrid but in Nice (France). France was, precisely, where Falla continued his education: lived in Paris since 1907, and met Debussy, Ravel, Dukas and Albéniz, who made their mark on that period's compositions, 'Noches en los jardines de España' in particular is a piece of unmistakable Spanish aroma and yet a somehow impressionistic instrumentation. Falla's creative maturity coincides with his return to Spain in 1914. It was the period in which he composed his most celebrated works: 'El amor brujo', 'El sombrero de tres picos' (composed on commission by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes), 'Siete canciones populares españolas' for voice and piano and 'Fantasía Bética' for piano. These compositions show the evolution of de Falla's style from the folkloric nationalism of the first scores, inspired on Andalusian and Castilian themes, melodies and twists, towards a nationalism grounded on Spanish Siglo de Oro musical tradition, represented in the opera 'El retablo de Maese Pedro', one of his mastepieces, and in the 'Concerto' for hapsichord and five instruments. While in former works Falla had displayed a broad palette of sounds, a direct result of the French influence, in his late compositions his style became austere and concise, especially in the 'Concerto'. Falla spent the last twenty years of his life working on what he thought was his masterpiece: the scenic cantata 'La Atlántida', on text by Catalan nationalist poet Jacint Verdaguer, on a theme that he had been obsessed with since childhood and which reflected all his philiosophical, religious and humanistic concerns. When the Spanish Civil War broke out he travelled to Argentina, where he died leaving his last work unfinished. The task of completing 'La Atlántida' from De Falla's drafts fell on his pupil Ernesto Halffter.

Biography

  • FALLA | Berganza < Canto

    7 Canciones populares españolas para voz y piano

    1. El paño moruno

    CLASS 1903: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Carácter, Dinámica - 1' 17''
  • FALLA | Berganza < Canto

    7 Canciones populares españolas para voz y piano

    5. Nana

    CLASS 6827: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Carácter, Ritmo - 2' 05''
    Colocación de la voz - 0' 58''

GARCÍA ABRIL, Antón

Picture: GARCÍA ABRIL, Antón

Teruel, 1933

Biography

  • GARCÍA ABRIL | Berganza < Canto

    Canciones de Valldemosa para voz y piano

    "No por amor, no por tristeza"

    CLASS 1716: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Claridad de ejecución, Atención al texto - 1' 05''
    Carácter, Dinámica - 1' 56''
    Dinámica, Métodos de estudio - 1' 21''

GARCÍA LORCA, Federico

Picture: GARCÍA LORCA, Federico

Fuentevaqueros, 1898 - Víznar, 1936

Biography

GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Picture: GENERALITIES, GENERALITIES

Biography

  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1493: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Relajación, Garganta - 1' 26''
    Métodos de estudio - 1' 03''
    Colocación de la voz - 1' 17''
    Aptitudes - 1' 13''
    Colocación de la voz, Agudos - 1' 12''
    Agudos, Colocación de la voz - 1' 22''
    Respiración - 1' 22''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1494: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Gestos del cuerpo, Respiración - 2' 04''
    Colocación de la voz, Respiración - 1' 06''
    Relajación - 1' 17''
    Relajación - 0' 51''
    Boca, Colocación de la voz - 1' 53''
    Actitud del músico - 1' 13''
    Respiración - 1' 32''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1533: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Respiración, Colocación de la voz - 1' 07''
    Agudos, Métodos de estudio - 1' 53''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1605: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Vocalizaciones, Colocación de la voz - 1' 06''
    Colocación de la voz - 1' 06''
    Agudos, Colocación de la voz - 0' 47''
    Boca, Colocación de la voz - 1' 29''
    Respiración - 1' 00''
    Colocación de la voz, Respiración - 1' 59''
    Agilidades, Colocación de la voz - 1' 14''
    Gestos del cuerpo, Brazo - 1' 09''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1631: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Colocación de la voz - 1' 11''
    Respiración - 1' 42''
    Colocación de la voz - 1' 02''
    Gestos del cuerpo - 2' 14''
    Respiración - 1' 34''
    Gestos del cuerpo, Relajación - 1' 13''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1665: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Colocación de la voz - 1' 05''
    Relajación - 0' 59''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1667: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Colocación de la voz, Relajación - 1' 14''
    Vocalizaciones - 0' 50''
    Colocación de la voz, Vocalizaciones - 2' 04''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1670: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Colocación de la voz, Vocalizaciones - 1' 06''
    Respiración, Vocalizaciones - 1' 26''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1688: [O.V.: English] [Tras: Spanish ]

    Content

    Timbre, Vocalizaciones - 1' 26''
    Métodos de estudio, Timbre - 1' 47''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1717: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Métodos de estudio, Respiración - 1' 41''
    Lengua - 1' 03''
    Colocación de la voz - 1' 43''
    Actitud del músico, Colocación de la voz - 1' 06''
    Columna de aire - 0' 59''
    Métodos de estudio, Emisión - 1' 23''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1721: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Vocalizaciones, Colocación de la voz - 1' 13''
    Colocación de la voz - 1' 02''
    Afinación, Colocación de la voz - 0' 57''
    Dinámica, Vocalizaciones - 0' 56''
    Respiración - 1' 42''
    Colocación de la voz, Respiración - 1' 18''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1732: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Colocación de la voz, Respiración - 1' 00''
    Colocación de la voz - 1' 17''
    Dinámica, Voz de falsete o cabeza - 2' 08''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1733: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Dinámica - 1' 08''
    Mantenimiento del sonido, Respiración - 1' 35''
    Agilidades - 1' 41''
    Agilidades - 1' 09''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1734: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Vocalizaciones, Colocación de la voz - 1' 03''
    Colocación de la voz, Respiración - 2' 33''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1743: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Colocación de la voz - 2' 21''
    Relajación, Staccato - 1' 21''
    Vocalizaciones, Fraseo - 1' 20''
    Agudos, Colocación de la voz - 1' 02''
    Formas de ataque, Resonancia - 2' 33''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1788: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Colocación de la voz, Técnica - 2' 26''
    Vocalizaciones, Colocación de la voz - 2' 03''
    Registros, Vocalizaciones - 1' 10''
    Columna de aire, Posición - 1' 44''
    Agudos, Relajación - 0' 57''
    Colocación de la voz, Gestos del cuerpo - 2' 02''
    Actitud del músico - 1' 26''
    Boca, Posición - 1' 30''
    Actitud del músico, Respiración - 1' 45''
    Vocalizaciones, Agudos - 1' 02''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1789: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Cuerdas vocales, Métodos de estudio - 1' 12''
    Relajación, Actitud del músico - 0' 58''
    Colocación de la voz, Vocalizaciones - 1' 28''
    Actitud del músico, Colocación de la voz - 1' 30''
    Vocalizaciones, Métodos de estudio - 1' 34''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Consejos del profesor

    CLASS 1791: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Respiración, Columna de aire - 1' 26''
    Columna de aire, Respiración - 1' 58''
    Colocación de la voz, Agudos - 1' 30''
    Colocación de la voz - 0' 54''
    Cuidado del instrumento - 0' 48''
    Colocación de la voz - 1' 36''
  • GENERALITIES | Berganza < Canto

    Ejercicios técnicos de canto

    CLASS 1796: [O.V.: Spanish] [Tras: English ]

    Content

    Vocalizaciones - 1' 04''
    Colocación de la voz, Métodos de estudio - 1' 49''
    Métodos de estudio, Agudos - 1' 10''
    Colocación de la voz, Vocalizaciones - 1' 05''